Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/178353/domains/unfitforpublication.org.au/html/plugins/system/gantry/gantry.php on line 406
1862, Molong Courthouse - Unfit For Publication
Text Size

 

Empire, Mon 2 Jan 1860 1

MOLONG.
————
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)


    Some four or five months ago, a petition was got up at a public meeting, and duly forwarded to the Governor-General, asking for a commonage for the town of Molong, to which an answer was received, stating that the petition had been referred to the proper quarter, and since then we have heard nothing further about the common. Another petition, asking for a new Courthouse and increased gaol accommodation, was also sent down to the Government, and in accordance with the prayer, a sum of money was placed on the estimates for a new Court-house and gaol at Molong, but the Cowper party went out of office and their successors have not done anything for us in that way that we are aware of. Meanwhile the wretched building yelept [sic] a Court-house still stands, and the wind still sighs and wails through the clefts and chinks between the slabs, of which it is composed, and through the broken windows, which said windows forcibly remind one of the poverty-stricken parts of a large city, where sash lights denuded of glass are almost the rule of every house. The magistrates complain and have complained for years past, and some of them, by sitting in the Court-house (an open Court truly), have before now caught severe colds; if those gentlemen have reason to complain, who come but once a week, what must it be for the poor CPS who has to sit there every day, truly he needs an iron constitution for neuralgia, colds, and rheumatism are to be braved there.

    We would again draw attention of members of the Assembly and the Government, to the claims of Molong to be a place where Quarter Sessions should be continued to be holden; it is centrically [sic] situated between Bathurst and Dubbo, therefore, the jury list would not interfere with either, being 57 or 58 miles from Bathurst, and about 70 from Dubbo, and about 25 to 30 miles from Iron Bark Digging on the north-eastern side, while a very extensive country lies to the westward in which it is said a large amount of crime is committed, which crime, in many instances, escapes being brought to justice solely through the distance to be travelled to prosecute.

    December 28th, 1859.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Empire, Wed 8 Feb 1860 2

PARLIAMENTARY INTELLIGENCE.
———•———
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7.
————

...

PETITIONS.

    Mr LORD presented a petition from 180 residents at Molong, praying for the establishment of Courts of Quarter Sessions in that locality.
...

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
———•———
NEW NOTICES OF MOTION.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8.

...

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10.

    Mr Lord to move—That the petition, relative to the establishment of a Court of Quarter Sessions at Molong, presented by him on the 7th instant, be printed.

~~~~~

Empire, Sat 6 Oct 1860 3

MOLONG.
————
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.)

Molong courthouse, built 1862. Photo ID: SRNSW 4346_a020_a020000038.jpg
Molong courthouse, built 1862.
Photo ID: SRNSW 4346_a020_a020000038.jpg

...
    We would again call attention to the disgraceful building called a court-house here. It is built of slabs; is 18 feet by 14 feet; has two windows on the western side, one of which has the apology for a shutter always put up, or pretending to be up, for said shutter is a few boards, which may have been nailed together in a long by=gone age, but are more detached from each other, and stand against the window in several different positions, but the window they pretend to hide is minus half the panes, and looks as though the house had been besieged by some drunken men “a long time ago.” It may be very pleasant for the public to sit on a stool near the said window in the summer-time; but it is at the risk of a stiff neck, if no worse. On the eastern side of the building is a shed, in which every Court day, are secured the equine quadrupeds of the great barons of this locality. Thus, while law is being administered by the J.P.’s, the poor have their olfactory nerves delighted with the perfume of the stable—thus improving their senses of hearing and smell at the same time. Moreover, the slabs are most conveniently open both for letting in the winds of heaven, and letting out the sound, so that during a trial, all that is said inside can be heard outside. The surly wind rushes in, and often displaces the papers, thus creating confusion, and causing frantic rushings about by the officials to secure them. The ceiling is made of calico, on which there are a number of islands depicted, made by the rain dropping through shingles, and forming fantastic shapes on the upper part of the room; and then the poor CPS, who can tell his sufferings? Obliged day after day to sit in this rats castle. Where he has the consolation of knowing, that whatever quarter the wind blows from, he is sure to have the benefit of it; but a truce to this strain. The place is a disgrace to the colony, and there ought to be a new one built without delay. One in all respects fit for the purpose could be build for £500; we having plenty of rubble stone in the town to build with. 

 


1  Empire, Mon 2 Jan 1860, p. 8.

2  Empire, Wed 8 Feb 1860, pp. 4, 8. Emphasis added.

3  Empire, Sat 6 Oct 1860, p. 8.