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1867, Edward Moxham and John Smith - Unfit For Publication
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The documentation of our history has to me always been a very important aspect. Although victories or celebrations are seldom part of this history, it’s important that it is put on record.

The cases recorded verbatim here, cover a very wide spectrum of emotions ranging from sadness, humour, violence, to compassion and even love.

For gay historians, this material gives an interesting insight into the lives of what we might call our ‘tribal ancestors’, for not only is the legal process on full view, but the evidence presented in each case gives us a window into these people’s lives, and how they managed their desires in a hostile society: where they might meet, how they might interact, and how they saw themselves and their ‘condition’.

Foreword by
Gary Wotherspoon

Peter de Waal

In the Central Police Court, George Harrison, alias “Carrie Swain,” an effeminate youth, was charged with vagrancy.

From the evidence of Senior-constable Sawtell and Constable Brown, it appeared that the prisoner was in the habit of frequenting Hyde Park and College-street, painted, powered, and bedecked so as to represent a female.

In this state he perambulated the streets and parks after dark. When arrested, it was found that he was wearing stays. The prisoner was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment with hard labour.

Gaol Photo - "Said to be a Pouftah"

1889, George Harrison

1889, George Harrison

A DETESTABLE CHARACTER.

The position of Darlinghurst Gaol is well known, and the prison forms a conspicuous object to persons travelling along the eastern tramline near where Botany-street branches off from Oxford-street. It covers an area of about 4¾ acres, and is situated on about the highest point of a ridge having between it and Oxford-street the Darlinghurst Courthouse, with the large plot of tree-planted land in front.

Darlinghurst gaol and courthouse, in foreground, complex, c. 1930.

"I looked over the rocks. I saw the two prisoners now before the court committing an unnatural crime. The prisoner Weston was in a stooping position with his head down and trousers down, and the prisoner Blackwell was behind him with his trousers down; and both in the act of copulation."

Blackwell and Weston were both sentenced in 1845 to twelve months hard labour in Darlinghurst Gaol.

The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 8 Mar 1886

Mr George Newbolt, Assistant Superintendent on Cockatoo Island.

Darlinghurst gaol and courthouse, in foreground, complex, c. 1930.

He took me into his wife’s bedroom.
He brought into the room a bottle of Vaseline.

He said “I can easily do it with a little Vaseline.”

I said I didn’t believe him that kind of thing.
I said “What good will it do me?”

Vaseline Advert

1899, Simeon Alexander Moss

1899, Simeon Moss

Charge of Indecent Assault.

Simeon Alexander Moss was charged with having committed an indecent assault on Stanley Lake at Bowral on 20th July, 1899.

‘We are glad to be able this week to present to our readers an illustration of the new court house at Yass, now in course of erection, the ceremony of laying the foundation-stone of which, on this 20th of July last, by the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, in the presence of the Premier, Minister of Works, Attorney-General, &c, was duly recorded in our columns. The design has been prepared by the Colonial Architect, and is on a scale commensurate with the requirements of the district. The style chosen is classic of the Roman Doric order. Advantage has been taken of the site to give effect to the design by its approach, which is by a very broad and imposing flight of steps.’

The April sitting of the Yass Circuit Court opened before his Honor Mr Justice Faucett on Wednesday last. Mr Plunkett acted as Judge’s Associate and Clerk of Arraigns, Mr Mann, prosecuted on behalf of the Crown, while Mr Ould represented the Crown Solicitor. The other legal gentlemen present were Mr Colonna Close, barrister-at-law, and Mr EA Iceton, solicitor. Mr T Colls JP represented the Sheriff.

1885, Henry Smith was found guilty of having committed bestiality and sentenced to three years’ hard labour in Yass gaol.

Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 31 Aug 1878

The Yass Courier, Fri 17 Apr 1885

IN writing this pamphlet my sole desire is to bring before the public the present injudicious system of treating juvenile delinquents, and those unfortunate children whose only crime is their poverty.

That a lad should be imprisoned simply because he is poor, is both brutal and unwise; but that he should he indiscriminately herded with young criminals is the height of folly and injustice.

That it is so, is undeniable.

On 25 January, 1867 the Colonial Secretary purchased the wooden sailing ship the “Vernon” and at a cost of more than eight and a half thousand pounds it was fitted up as an Industrial School. The ship, moored in Sydney Harbour between the Government Domain and Garden Island was declared a Public Industrial School on 6 May, 1867.

Industrial Schoolship - Vernon

 


The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Thu 5 Sep 1867 1

DISTRICT NEWS.
————
(FROM OUR VARIOUS CORRESPONDENTS.)
————

...

RAYMOND TERRACE.

    POLICE COURT, 2nd SEPTEMBER, 1867.—(Before HJ Bolding, PM, and J Windeyer, JP.)—Two persons, named Smith and Muxham [sic], strangers in this district, were apprehended on Saturday evening last. To-day they were brought before the above-named magistrates and charged with an unnatural offence. The evidence is unfit for publication. They were both committed to take their trial at the next Maitland Circuit Court.

    2nd Sept, 1867.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Depositions for Edward Moxham and John Smith 21 Oct 1867 Maitland trial 2

Deposition of Witnesses.

Raymond Terrace.

    The examination of Daniel O'Sullivan, Senior Constable of Police in the Colony of New South Wales, and John Malley, Constable of Police in the said Colony, taken on oath this 2nd day of September in the Year of Our Lord One thousand eight hundred and 67, at Raymond Terrace in the Colony aforesaid, before the undersigned, two of Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said Colony in the presence and hearing of John Smith and Edward Moxham, who are charged this day before us for that day the said John Smith and Edward Moxham on the thirty first day of August 1867 at Raymond Terrace, in the said Colony, did commit the crime of Sodomy.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Henry James Bolding,
Raymond Terrace, 6 September 1867

William Edmond Plunkett, Under Secretary,
Crown Law Department, Sydney

    In separate cover by this post I have the honour to forward Depositions and Recognizance of Witnesses in the case of John Smith and Edward Moxham committed for trail at Maitland Circuit Court, 21st October by this bench.

    I have the Honour to be,
      Sir,
    your most obedient Servant.
[Signed] HJ Bolding PM.

1

    This Deponent, Daniel O'Sullivan, sworn, states that I am Senior Constable of Police stationed at Raymond Terrace, on Saturday night last, 31st of August, I was on duty near the Steam Packet Inn about 10 o'clock my attention was drawn to Mrs Holdstock's Inn the Steam Packet Inn by hearing obscene language used by some person in the bedroom facing the street  there was a light in the room at the time  it is the end room of the house and fronting two streets  Constable Malley was with me  we went together to the window of the bedroom — there was no blind or shutter to the window and we could see all that was going on in the room I hear all that was said in it —

    I saw both the prisoners John Smith and Edward Moxham in the room. There was nobody else in the room.

2

They both undressed after we came up to the window  when I first saw them they were standing up, the prisoner Moxham was smoking then and I don't know whether Smith was then smoking but he was afterwards. They were talking together  Smith, the prisoner, said to Moxham, that he was a good mate and he would not part with him and he said "I got half a crown from the priest and I'll get ten shillings from the bloody parson tomorrow"  they were undressing whilst this talk was going on  Moxham said something about going up to the Williams River and Smith said he would not let him go  there were two beds in the room but they both got into one bed and afterwards the light was put out by Moxham — it was a candle and was within reach of Moxham as he lay in bed — Smith said to Moxham "Turn over to me, put your arms around me," I heard them turn or move in the bed

3

and Moxham said to Smith "your breath [sic] will sicken me" and Smith said " this is the right way for two to lay in bed." There was something further said by Smith to Moxham to this effect  "gammon that I'm your old woman"  I can't state the exact words used  Smith said other words about Moxham's private parts and he said to Moxham "Push it" Moxham said "I can't" and Smith said "you are too bloody large  spit on it" I heard somebody spit and then I heard Smith say "let me" and then he said "now push" I think Smith said "now you are an inch in me" and then he said "now you are two" and then he said "you are in me now quite" or "quite in me now"  after that they were quiet for a few minutes  about 4 or 5 minutes. I heard then Moxham say that he was sick and I heard him heaving up from his stomach  the bed was against the wall

4

in the corner nearest to the window and came in front of the window a little and on my right hand side as I stood at the window  Smith was nearest to the wall and Moxham's head was almost close to the window, about 18 inches from it  after Moxham was sick Smith got out of bed and lighted a candle  I believe he used a match to do it  he was quite naked  Moxham was lying in bed when the candle was lighted by Smith  Smith said something about the bloody bed cloth I forget his exact words and he pulled them off Moxham and spread them on the bed again and got into the bed again leaving the candle burning  he then said to Moxham "turn in to me" and Moxham said "let me alone I'm too sick" Smith spoke to him several times and wanted him to turn in to him and said "lay down your legs you are no good to fuck or let me be fucked" and more to that effect  Moxham did not comply but

5

said "wait until morning" Smith said "you'll be too bloody religious in the morning"  I then went away and returned about half an hour afterwards having previously tapped at the bar door and told Mrs Holdstock not to shut up until I returned  I went away with Constable Malley and it was to get two pair of handcuffs  we returned to the house and Mrs Holdstock showed us the room  I pushed open the door and went with Constable Malley into the room, the prisoners were in bed I told them to get up  they should come to the watch house  Smith said "where is your warrant" he seemed unwilling to come but they both got out of the bed and were quite naked  they dressed themselves and we took them to the watch house  Constable Malley took Smith and I took Moxham, we handcuffed them before leaving the room. Coming along Moxham said "I'm sure I don't know what I've done" I said "you know very

6

well what you were doing tonight." He said "I bloody well knew what brought you here when I saw you coming in but I thought it was as good to come quietly"  I gave him the usual caution and after that he said  "It was my mate that made me do all  I was drunk  I'll tell the truth  I did it and it was he made me" I took him to the lockup and when there he signed a statement admitting he was guilty,  by Smith the prisoner I saw you undressing and smoking I saw you quite naked  I was long enough listening to your voice to know it  I swear to your expressions.

[Signed] Daniel O'Sullivan.

Taken and sworn this 2nd September 1867 at Raymond Terrace before us:
[Signed] HJ Bolding PM and J Windeyer, JP.

7

And this deponent John Malley sworn, states: I am a Constable of Police and am stationed at Raymond Terrace  between 10 and 11 o'clock on Saturday night 31st August. I was passing Mrs Holdstock's public house on duty in company with Senior Constable O'Sullivan  our attention was attracted to the room at the far end of the house a bedroom by seeing a man walking inside and using obscene and indecent language so loud that we could hear it in the street  we went up close to the window and saw both the prisoners Smith and Moxham inside  Smith was the principal one using the obscene language. He was at that time taking the clothes off the bed and arranging it  he then stripped naked and went in to bed  Moxham was then partly undressed and Smith told him to take off his shirt  he took off his shirt then and got into the same bed with Smith who told him to turn round to him he said "put your leg over me and imagine you have a woman" or "think you have one"  I don't remember which. I heard the sound of lips as

8

if kissing. I believe the candle was then burning  they then lowered their voice and kept talking and I heard a noise as of persons taking liberties with each other and the first loud expression was Smith saying "I lay on my belly" and then I heard Smith say "you are so bloody large" they then spoke in whispers and then Smith said "sit upon it" and afterwards he said "you are in now about an inch" and after that he said "now you are 2" and then he said "you are about 3 now" he used most fearful language all the time and then he said "you are right up me  push now"  then they were quiet some time.

    Then I believe Smith got up and blew the light out  Smith then said to Moxham "I let you fuck me then you let me do the same" Moxham said "I'm sick I'll spew on you  wait till morning"  Smith continued pressing Moxham to let him do it and Moxham refused. Moxham said "You'll be too bloody religious in the morning" — I was quite close to the 

9

window And could see them both in bed while the candle was burning — there was no curtain on the window 
Senior Constable O'Sullivan and I went into the house and found the prisoners in bed. We took a light into the room with us  Smith was not willing to get out of bed  we said we were constables and came to arrest them. Smith wanted to know what for and whether we had a warrant  they then got out of bed and dressed themselves and I handcuffed Smith and O'Sullivan handcuffed Moxham and we took them to the watch house  I took Smith and O'Sullivan took Moxham and I charged them with committing and unnatural offence. Smith said in answer to the charge "I would sooner shoot myself" and afterwards Moxham signed a written statement admitting that he had done it.

[Signed] John Malley.

Taken and sworn at Raymond Terrace this 2nd September 1867 before us.
[Signed] HJ Bolding, PM and J Windeyer, JP.

10

Statement of the Accused.

Raymond Terrace John Smith and Edward Moxham stand charged before the undersigned, two of Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace in and for the Colony aforesaid, this 2nd day of September in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven for that day the said John Smith and Edward Moxham on the 31st day of August 1867 at Raymond Terrace in the said Colony, did commit the crime of sodomy and the examinations of all the witnesses on the part of the prosecution having been completed, and the depositions taken against the accused having been read or caused to be read to them by the said Justices by or before whom such examination has been so completed, and the said Justices having also stated to the accused and given them severally clearly to understand that they have nothing to hope from any promise of favour and nothing to fear from any threat which may have been holden out to them to induce them to make any admission or confession of their guilt, but that whatever they shall say may be given in evidence against them upon their trial, notwithstanding such promise or threat; and the said charge being read to the said John Smith and Edward Moxham and the witnesses for the prosecution Daniel O'Sullivan and John Malley being severally examined in their presence, the said Jon Smith and Edward Moxham were respectively addressed as follows: "Having heard the evidence, do you wish to say anything in answer to the charge? You are not obliged to say anything unless you desire to do so; but whatever you say will be taken down in writing, and may be given in evidence against you upon your trial; Whereupon the said John Smith and Edward Moxham severally said as follows: 

Old Parramatta Lunatic Asylum being demolished. Image: Illustrated Sydney News,  Mon 16 Jul 1866, p. 9 . Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Old Parramatta Lunatic Asylum being demolished.
Image: Illustrated Sydney News, Mon 16 Jul 1866, p. 9.
Reproduction: Peter de Waal

11

    The prisoner John Smith having been duly cautioned said: “I was drunk at the time and such an act has never been committed by either of us and neither of us have been examined by a Medical Officer to prove if it has been committed, and further when a drop of drink gets into my head I’m totally mad and don’t know what I’m saying or doing and further I’ve been treated as an insane man in Parramatta Lunatic Asylum and was discharged from there on 15th last December [1866].
[Signed] John Smith.

    And the prisoner Edward Moxham having been duly cautioned said: “All I’ve got to say is that if I had not met with this man nothing of the sort would have occurred. I came with him to Patrick Hill Farm about 3 o’clock on Saturday and engaged to drive bullocks and I came down the river in a boat to the Terrace to get tobacco and Smith went ahead of me and I met Smith in the Terrace on the wharf at Ewens when I got out of the boat and we went to Ewens and had grog 7 or 8 times

12

till both him and me was drunk and we went to every public house in the town and asked for a bed and could not get one and we went to the Public House by the punt and he directed us to Mrs Holdstock and there we called for liquor again three or four times and sang two or three songs. Mrs Holdstock showed us a room and Smith forced me to commit the offence upon him and he wanted to commit the same upon me and I said I was sick in the stomach and told him to wait till the morning and I don’t remember any more till he was arrested and brought to the lockup.

[Signed] Edward Moxham.

The statements of John Smith and Edward Moxham made and written down and signed before us this 2nd September 1867
[Signed] HJ Bolding, PM and J Windeyer, JP.

The prisoners John Smith and Edward Moxham committed for trial at Maitland Circuit Court, 21st October next.
[Signed] HJ Bolding, PM and J Windeyer, JP.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

G. No. 2
Warrant of Commitment for Trial.

NEW SOUTH WALES, Raymond Terrace
TO WIT                                            }

By me Henry James Bolding Esquire, one of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace in and for the Colony of New South Wales.

    To Mr Daniel O’Sullivan a Senior a Constable in the Police Force for the District of Raymond Terrace in the Colony aforesaid, and that all other Constables in the said Police Force, and to all other Peace Officers of and for the said Colony and to the Keeper of Her Majesty’s Gaol at Maitland

    WHEREAS John Smith of ----- was this day charged before me, Henry James Bolding Esquire, one of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace in and for the said Colony on the oath of Daniel O’Sullivan of Raymond Terrace and others, for that he did on 31st August 1867 at Raymond Terrace aforesaid Commit the Crime of Sodomy these are therefore to command you and each of you, to take the said John Smith and him safely to convey to the Common Gaol, at Maitland and there to deliver him to the Keeper thereof, together with this precept, and I do hereby command you, the said Keeper of the said Gaol, to receive the said John Smith into your custody in the said Gaol, and there safely keep him until he shall be thence delivered by due course of law. Given under my Hand and Seal, this 2nd day of September in the year of Our Lord One thousand eight hundred and fifty sixty seven at the Raymond Terrace in the Colony of New South Wales.

[Signed] Henry James Bolding PM Justice of the Peace.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

George Henry Stace, Gaoler
East Maitland, 20 January 1868

John Williams, Crown Solicitor, Sydney

Sir,
    I beg leave to report to you that the prisoner named in the margin (John Smith) – who was for trial at the last Circuit Court held here in October /67 for committing unnatural offence with Edward Moxham – has returned from the Lunatic Asylum at Tarban Creek Parramatta having recorded sanity. I have the honour to be, Sir, yours obediently.
[Signed] GH [George Henry] Stace, Gaoler.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

[On the reverse of the above is the following]

    20th January 1868 Gaoler Maitland stating that John Smith had be [sic] returned from Tarban Creek having recorded sanity.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

John Williams, Crown Solicitor
Sydney 21 February 1868

James Martin QC, Attorney General, Sydney

Regina v. John Smith.

    This prisoner was, with one Edward Moxham, committed for trial at the Circuit Court Maitland in October [1867] last on a charge of Sodomy.
    Moxham was found guilty – John Smith having become insane, was not put upon his trial.
    The Gaoler Maitland informs me that Smith has been returned to his custody from the Lunatic Asylum Tarban Creek, having recorded sanity.
    Will the Attorney General be good enough to say whether case should be proceeded with at next Maitland CC on 20th April (?) 

[Signed] John Williams, Crown Solicitor.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

[On reverse of the above letter is the following]

    Let the case be tried at the next Maitland Circuit Court. 3rd March 1868 [John] Williams, Crown Solicitor.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Justice A Cheeke’s Notebook  3

[1]

[Maitland]
Edward Moxham
Sodomy

    [Senior] Constable [Daniel] O’Sullivan At the Steam Packet Inn Raymond Terrace before 10 (pm ?) o’clock at (?) (room ?) (of the ?) house. I was on duty, heard obscene language (from ?) (?) (?) to Prisoner named Smith. The Prisoner was there. There was a light. Both undressed. Prisoner was compelled to take off his cloathes although (with ? not ?) hesitation. (2 beds ?) (?) room. They took (?) cloathing off (?) bed and they put it on that bed. Both went into the same bed – when Smith said turn to me as if I were your old woman Prisoner did so; (words ?) expressed cannot say by whom (then ?) I heard Smith to Moxham

[2]

say push it. Prisoner Smith said to Moxham you are to large. Smith then said spit on it, hold on let me & then he said here spit. Then he said push it now – now you are an inch, now two, then three. Then Prisoner put out (the ?) candle (without ?) getting out of bed – then Prisoner got sick, Smith lit the candle again. Then he wanted Moxham to turn to him to let him do the same. Prisoner declined, he said wait until (morning ?). He said you’ll be too (religious ?) in the morning. Then the light was put out – Smith said he (?) (money ?) from a Priest and (Parson ?) that he would not part with (them ? him ?) – (We ?) then (apprehended ?) both Moxham & Smith. Prisoner said did not know (?) (?). I said you know what you were doing

[3]

tonight, might as well (?) guilty – I said I did it but that I was made (?) by Smith. I cautioned to Prisoner. He said his age was 17. Statement read made by the Prisoner and signed by him. Smith is older than the Prisoner some 30 years of age.

    Constable [John Malley] (31st) August on duty with Sullivan I saw two men in a room at the end of the House, Smith & Prisoner. Saw the Prisoner with (man ?) Smith stripped naked and went to bed. When Smith said (put ?) your arms round me fancy he had a woman. Smith said he would lie on his Belly – he said Prisoner was very large, says spit upon it – then he said you are in to me now about an inch, then two, then 3 – then you are right up.

[4]

Afterwards we (apprehended ?) them – Bed close to the window, he stood quite close – he went to the Station, got revolver – Smith is in a Lunatic Asylum for about 6 weeks.

    Prisoner [Moxham] states: I attempted to commit but never did it.

Guilty,  with recommendation – on (account ?) of youth.
Death  recorded – (17 years of age)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Tue 22 Oct 1867 4

MAITLAND CIRCUIT COURT

    This court opened yesterday [Monday 21 October 1867] morning, before his Honor Mr Justice Cheeke. The usual proclamation against vice and immorality was read by the judge’s associate, Mr Cheeke. The barristers present were the Solicitor-General (Mr RM Isaacs), Messrs Pilcher, Healey, Windeyer.

    Mr JBR Robertson was in attendance as sheriff’s deputy.

UNNATURAL OFFENCE

    Edward Moxham was indicted for having, on the 31st August last, [1867] at Raymond Terrace, committed an offence of the above description.
    The prisoner, a lad said to be aged seventeen years but looking some years younger, pleaded not guilty, and was undefended.
    The witnesses were sergeant O’Sullivan and John Melly [sic]. The evidence was unfit for publication.
    His Honor having summed up with great care, the jury retired to consider their verdict, and after some consideration returned into court with a verdict of guilty, but recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of his youth.
    The prisoner was remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Tue 29 Oct 1867 5

MAITLAND CIRCUIT COURT
SATURDAY, 26th OCTOBER 1867
(Before Mr Justice Cheeke.)
SENTENCES


    Edward Moxem, [sic] convicted of an unnatural offence, was brought up for sentence. His Honor, in ordering sentence of death to be recorded. Informed the prisoner that his life would be spared, but that upon the Executive would depend what was done with him.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Parramatta Lunatic Asylum Admission Form, 24 Sep 1867 6 
 

 STATEMENT of particulars connected with

John Smith

 A Lunatic, examined by:

 

 William Wilton MD [and] William Spink MD duly qualified Medical Practitioners, with a view to his admission in a Lunatic Asylum

 What is his Age ?

 Unknown

 Religion ?

 Unknown

 Native place ?

 Unknown

 Late residence

 Unknown

 Previous occupation

 Unknown

 Is he single, married, or widowed ?

 Unknown

 The number of children ?

 Unknown

 Age of youngest child ?

 Unknown

 What is the form of mental disorder ?

 Mania in a violent form

 What is the supposed cause ?

 Unknown

 How long has it existed ? 

 Unknown

 Has its approach been sudden or slow ?

 Unknown

 Has any personal restraint been employed ?

 Yes

 Has the patient been insane before ?

 Unknown

 State the number of attacks

 The present only known

 And the distance of time between each

 Unknown

 Have there been any lucid intervals ?

 No

 Is the disease hereditary, constitutional, or causal ?

 Unknown

 Have you observed anything peculiar in his habits ?

 Always craving for food and (?) (?) (?) he is (?)

 Has he shown any disposition to refuse food ?

 No

 Is he disposed to injure him self or others ?

 Yes

 Have any medical means been employed ?

 None

 Has he ever been in any asylum for lunatics ?

 Not known

 Is the patient’s bodily health good ?

 Yes

 Then describe the particulars of the disease

 No disease

 Has he ever had palsy, or fits of any kind; gout rheumatism, heart disease, or syphilis

 Unknown

 Give the address of the patient’s friends

 

 What property has he with him

 

[Signed] William Wilton

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 

[On the reverse of the above is the following]

Sept 24th /67
John Smith, Col Lunatic Admission

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 

Parramatta Hospital Medical Case Book 26 Sep - 16 Dec 1867 7

 John Smith Aged   Admitted 24th September 1867
Darlinghurst GaolG. in (?) Warrant charged with an unnatural crime
Date DISEASE – with detailed Symptoms TREATMENT Class of Diet. Extra Allowances
Sept 26th He came here from Darlinghurst and his Escorts were totally ignorant of his history and circumstances. He has been an Inmate of this Asylum before and bears an infamous character – having attempted or perpetrated sodomy with a boy at Raymond Terrace. He is an unwholesome and disgusting looking object, and is little better then a mass of loathesome [sic] disease. He is said to be devoid fo every vestige of moral principle – a determined mischief maker, Grumbler and Malcontent. His appetite is veracious, and he is always complaining that he is starved. His manners are rude and insolent.      
Sept 30th He is a troublesome mischief making grievance mongering Patient.      
Oct 29th This man is almost certainly not insane. He has professed a good deal of desire to go back to Goal to stand his trial. Yesterday however it appeared by the Newspaper that his fellow (?) had been sentenced to death on the charge, and loud as have been heretofore, his asserting of innocence, it is questionable whether he would at present deserve to be thought sane.      
Nov 30th This man is certainty not insane and is perfectly able to stand his trial.      
Dec 3rd Continues sane.      
Dec 16th Discharged to Maitland Goal.      


~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Harold Maclean, Sheriff letter, 20 Dec 1867 8

The Sheriff requesting authority for removal of Edward Moxham from Maitland Gaol to Sydney.

67/7348

 Harold Maclean
Sheriffs Office
Prison Branch
Sydney 20 December 1867

67/4266

Henry Halloran, Principal Under Secretary,
Colonial Secretary’s Office, Sydney

Sir,
    I do myself the honor to request authority to transfer the prisoner named in the margin, (Edward Moxham) who was convicted, at the last Maitland Assizes, of Sodomy, from the Gaol here to Sydney Gaol in order to separate 9 him from John Smith upon whom the offence was committed and who is at present confined in the former Establishment.

    I have the honor to be
       Sir,
    Your Obedient Servant
[Signed] Harold Maclean,
Sheriff.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Superintendent Parramatta Lunatic Asylum Monthly Report, 31 Dec 1867 10

68/28

Lunatic Asylum
Parramatta December 31st 1867
Report

Principal Under Secretary, Colonial Secretary, Sydney

Sir,
    I do myself the honor to furnish for the information of the Hon the Colonial Secretary the monthly report of the state of these Asylums during the month now expired.

    This period has been marked by no unusual incidents, and the sanitary condition of the Establishment has continued highly satisfactory for although the death as in the preceeding [sic] month are above the average, the incurable, as in that instance explained, has depended on circumstances

2

which have no reference to malaria, epidemic or general causes, being exclusively the natural result of long standing chronic disease, or the effect produced on already nearly exhausted stamina by the unusual heat of the season.

    For the more perfect nightly supervision of the Female patients, an attendant, by rotation is now put on duty as a nightwatch; which was a provision much needed and which will conduce greatly to the security and necessary attention to the inmates. This has been done without any addition of expense, as has also another change on the male side, where all the suicidal patients have been assembled in one general sleeping room, with an

3

attendant on duty all night long to watch them.

    Total number of Inmates is at present 533 of whom 56 are male British and 271 Colonial. The female British are 6 and the Colonial 180. There are 20 female invalids & infants all Colonial. In the Invalid Depot Macquarie Street there are 38 male Invalids of whom 30 are British & Colonial making a total of 571 Souls under my charge.

    The admissions were 1 Lunatic and 3 British Invalids 3 Lunatics have been discharged 2 British Invalids sent to Gaol for various short periods and 1 on his readmission absconded 1 Female and 4 Male lunatics 11 died. The female from marasmus, 1 male from

4

phthisis and the others from paralyses or the exhaustion of old age.

    The appendix will shew in a condensed form the statistical particulars [see table below] and the needlework [see table below] done by the patients.

    I have the honor to be
       Sir
    Your most obedient Servant
[Signed] E Wardley
Superintendent

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

68/28

Appendix for December 1867

    Return of the numbers of Lunatics and Invalids in the Lunatics Asylum and Invalid Depot in Parramatta

Parramatta Lunatic Asylum Monthly Report, Appendix I, Dec 1867

 

Lunatics

Lunatics

Invalids female & infants

Male Invalids in Macquarie St

Male Brit

Male Col

Female Brit

Female Col

Brit

Col

56

271

6

180

20

30

8

Total Lunatics

513

 

 

 

Total in the Asylum

533

 

 

Grand Total

571

 

December 1868 movements

Lunatics

Invalids

Admitted during December 1868

Charles Jones

Daniel Ridgely *; James (Farrele ?) *; John Cox *

Discharged during December 1868

Edward Callaghan; John Smith; Hugh Vaughan

John Cox #; James (Farrele ?) #; John Cox, absconded

Died during December 1868

Samuel Roberts; George Brown; Patrick Jones; Daniel Ross; Mary AE Webb

 

* denotes: Readmitted from Gaol. # denotes: Gaol

 

Parramatta Lunatic Asylum Needlework Items Made During, Appendix II, Dec 1867

 

Dresses............. 54

Frock................ 1

Aprons.......... 119

Hoods.............. 54

Pinafores............ 22

Chemises.......... 4

Shroud................ 1

Petticoats.......... 2

Sheet............... 1

Collars.............. 6

Pudding caps...... 46

 

[Signed] E Wardley
Superintendent

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Justice JF Hargrave’s Notebook   12 13 

5

Q v. John Smith
Sodomy
adj [adjourned] ----- see p. [7]. 

7

 Q v. John Smith

on 12 Aug 1867    Sodomy
 at East Maitland    Ed. Moxham

 

    Isaacs SG Absence of material witness. Dr Pringle affidavit my district. Archbold p. 146 – (authority ?) amply (insufficient ?) though to adjourning the application i.e. to postpone the trial altogether till this witness appears. The Jury would have to be locked up till the witness appears. I held that I had no power to discharge the Jury after sworn for absence of any witness, however important after the jury in charge – For this no authority was cited & the Crown (declining ?) to withdraw a (Juror ?). The case proceeded. The affidavit seemed also defective in not (swearing ?) to the (probability ?) of (?) Dr P – & no (other ?) (except ?) (?).

8

    Daniel O’Sullivan S[enior] C[onstable] of P[olice] Raymond Terrace saw prisoner at Steam Packet Inn – obscene language from a bedroom in that House – drew near & saw prisoner & another lad – undressed & going to bed (the other ?) take off everything – two beds in room, they got into one – Smith took clothing off, head to window – I & (another ?) constable out of Court – heard Smith’s voice & could see candle lighted. Heard Smith say “(?) with me as if I were your old woman.” – Have seen him since he was (a ?) young looking. Smith said put your arms round me this way – & other words in low voice – (?) push – push – you so large spit on it – I heard spitting – now one two three & now right up – obscene language (shortly ?) (?) other prisoner got sick & Smith asked him to let him do but he refused (& ?) was too sick – wait till morning – Prisoner said no. Smith then got up & a light (?) (?). I went to station for (revolver ?) – prisoner resisted thinking bushrangers – I took Moxham, & Smith by other constable, brought before Court – Smith on going to M. said something about seeing persons being hanged for less than M. had said.

9

    Cross-examined [by barrister] Docker. At first went to Inn between 11 & 12 when heard first (conversation?). The bedroom was in end of house & facing two streets – one window only; could see in, no curtain – tallow candle & could see faces, could recognize them – was away about 10 minutes or less & then arrested them about ¼ to 12. (?) 5 min to 12 – to Moxham – was listening 20 min. at window; at first Prisoner was undressing – smoking & talking & apparently drinking about 10 minutes altogether. Were not drunk – nor when apprehended – The prisoner seemed quite steady & collected heard all I have said – the expressions – The light was burning at first – put out by Mox – saw their persons – no trousers – candle put out (in ?) the conversation I have said – when candle lighted heard M. refuse & prisoner get out of bed & speak of place being dirty from his vomit (&c. &c.?). From (conversation ?) (thought ?) them Bushrangers – this was on Saturday 31st August (1867) – no doubt about the prisoner being the man.

10

    (2) John Malley In company with last witness saw prisoner there in an end room of Mrs Holdstock’s Steam Packet Inn in company with Mox. a candle & no curtain; attracted by bad language (of ?) prisoner. The prisoner went to bed first – stripped – heard prisoner ask other to take off shirt – light then blown out – then prisoner told him to turn towards him & put his arms about him like a woman then he would (lie ? be ?) on his face – you are so b. – large spit upon it. He then said you’re into me now; 1. in 2. in 3. in it. Then Mox. got sick. Smith rose & lit the candle – Then asked M. to allow him – said in morning. M still refused; more than once. SC O’S. [Senior Constable O’Sullivan] & I entered the room & arrested – I took Smith. He said he was not guilty; found both in bed together – no shirts on. Smith refused to come till forced to come.

    Cross-examined. About 11 o’c – saw prisoner & other person in room – no doubt about identity, candle burning in room –

11

    They were boasting about getting money from (persons ?) & priests – got into bed in five minutes candle burning – one blew it out – I turned my back to window – did not then suspect such an offence – no doubt about what they said – time was very short not 2 m. till it was committed – no time to prevent it; did not rap at window – can’t assign any reason for not tapping – I was a constable & should have prevented it if I had known & what they said. Whilst they were talking about it they committed the offence; can’t assign any reason for not breaking window; not a constable now – I have resigned; dismissed before I resigned – saw the candle burning – part of the time – saw prisoner & M. in room for five minutes while light was burning. Cannot swear whether light burning while offence committed – saw it relit by Smith, might have sworn that saw Smith blow light out but don’t recollect – swear that the language used, 1.2.3.in, then quiet. If I then swore he blew candle out mistake. (?) the light was out then & that prisoner got up & relit it, don’t think asked anything about not looking in all the time – might have been blown out.

    Rd. – not clear recollection about light but was (horrific ? horrified ?).

[11a]

This crime has been existing in all ages.
disgusting – source of other crimes (analogous ?) 
capital punishment (?)
Sodomy defined p. 590 Archb:–

(2)

penetration alone is sufficient to constitute the offence

(1)

equal offence in the pathic 14 or recr.
[receiver] as by the agent

 2

constables did prevent the next morning engagement
&c. evidence received


verdict “Guilty” 
sentence of death recorded
∵ might have been more guilt & atrocity

12

For defence

    Dr W Milton (An ?) (examining ?) (prisoner ?) by order (?) – knows prisoner very well, examined his person suffering from disease two fistulous (openings ?) one each side of arms (for ? four ?) oblitary fistula – no effect on person very painful nothing whatever to do with such an offence, not pain – would not feel it – (principally ?) inconveniencing – pain is in remedy – seen him often in gaol –

    Docker [Barrister] for prisoner – made no attempt to prevent this crime, other person not called.

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Tue 21 Apr 1868 15

John Smith, 1868 
MONDAY 20th APRIL 1868
MAITLAND CIRCUIT COURT

    This court opened yesterday [Monday 20th April 1868] morning at East Maitland, before his Honor Mr Justice Hargrave. The barristers present were the Solicitor General, Messrs Ellis, Wisdom, Rogers, Murray and Docker.
    Mr JBR Robertson was in attendance as Sheriff.
    The usual proclamation against vice and immorality was read by the Judge’s Associate.

SODOMY

    James Smith was charged with having, on the 31st August, 1867, at Raymond Terrace, committed sodomy.

    The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and having no counsel, Mr Docker, at the request of his Honor, undertook his defence, assisted by Mr Thompson.

    After the jury was empanelled, Mr Docker made application for a postponement of the case, on account of the absence of a material witness, Dr Pringle, for the defence. The application was refused at that stage of the proceedings.

    The Crown examined senior-constable O’Sullivan and James Malley.

    The evidence was of a nature unfit for publication. It proved the commission of the offence. Medical evidence called for the defence was ineffective for the purpose.

    Mr Docker addressed the jury for the defence, reviewing the evidence of the Crown.

    The Solicitor-General replied, and his Honor having summed up, the jury retired. After a brief deliberation they returned into court, and gave in a verdict of guilty. His Honor directed a sentence of death to be recorded against the prisoner.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Judge John F Hargrave, NSW Supreme Court, report, 6 May 1868 16

68/897
68/2637

Judge John F Hargrave6
May 1868

Colonial Secretary, Sydney

    Report of His Honor Mr Justice Hargrave in the Capital Case, The Queen v. John Smith.

    This Prisoner was tried before me at the last Assizes at Maitland and convicted of Sodomy on the person of Edward Moxham at East Maitland on the 1st August 1867.

    At my request Mr Docker defended the Prisoner. 17

    It appeared by evidence that the Prisoner, and the said Edward Moxham, were at a Public House on the 1st August 1867, and about eleven o’clock at night went to a bedroom at the end of the Verandah – The attention of two constables, named O’Sullivan and Malley, was attracted to the Prisoners by their obscene language, and they were watched through a window by these constables, there being a lighted candle in the room; and from their conversation, and actions the Jury could have no reasonable doubt of the guilt of the Prisoners, and that he was the original instigator of the crime, and more guilty than the said Edward Moxham.

    I concur in the verdict, but ordered sentence of death to be recorded; being of opinion that the circumstances of the case

2

(although excessively disgusting) were not accompanied with any violence or other atrocity or aggravation; which should preclude me from recommending the Prisoner to mercy under the Statute 4 Geo 4. C. 48. Sect. 1.

    I presume that there is no necessity for me to report specifically any of the details of the evidence

[Signed] John F Hargrave
Supreme Court
Sydney

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

A note on the above report states:

    His Honor Mr Justice Hargrave may be applied to, to make same recommendation as to the commuted sentence of death recorded in the case of John Smith.
25 May 68

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Judge Hargrave
26 May 1868

68/2745

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

1

Henry Halloran, Principal Under Secretary,
Colonial Secretary’s Office
Sydney 26th May 1868

68/2637
55
Justice Hargrave

Sir,
    In acknowledging the receipt of your Blank Cover report respecting the prisoner named in the margin (John Smith) who was convicted before Your Honour at the late Maitland Assizes and had sentence of death recorded against him; I am directed by the Colonial Secretary to request that you will be good enough to say in what way the sentence of the prisoner should, in your opinion

2

be commuted.

I have the honour to be,
       Sir,
    Your Honour’s
       Most obedient Servant.
[Signed] Henry Halloran

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

A note on the above report states:

    I find that Edward Moxham the particeps criminis [one who has a share in a crime; an accessory] with John Smith is under a sentence of three years and as John Smith was by far the more guilty of the two, I should recommend imprisonment with hard labour for not less than five years.

[Signed] John F Hargrave
May 29th 1868

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

[Initialled] (?) [AG]
30/5/68

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

His Excellency
approved [initialled]
11/6/66 [sic] 1868

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Judge Hargrave
Sheriff
2 June [1868]

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

68/2745

James Gordon
NSW Supreme Court
Sydney 29th May 1868

Henry Halloran, Principal Under Secretary,

Colonial Secretary’s Office, Sydney

Sir,
    At the request of His Honor Mr Justice Hargrave I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 26th Instant & to return the same with the recommendation of His Honor endorsed thereon. 18

    I have the honour to be,
      Sir,
    Your obediently
[Signed] James Gordon

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Benjamin Lee, Acting Visiting Justice of East Maitland Gaol Report to, Col Sec, Sydney, 2 Jun 1868 19

68/2887

[Received] 6th June 1868

Acting Visiting Justice of East Maitland Gaol to the Hon the Colonial Secretary “Monthly Report”

HM Gaol East Maitland
2nd June 1868

Sir,

[1] I have to honor to forward herewith enclosed the Monthly State of the number of Prisoners confined [see table below] in this Gaol. Also a return of all Punishments [see table below] inflicted for Offences in the Gaol.

2 The discipline of the Gaol has been carried out to the best of my knowledge and belief in strict accordance with The Rules and Regulations.

    I have the honour to be,
        Sir,
    Your Most obedient Servant.
[Signed] Benjamin Lee, JP
Act. Visiting Justice

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Inmates at East Maitland Gaol, May 1868 

 

Con-fine

Hard

Labor

For Trial

Remanded

Deb-tors

Luna-tics

For D’hurst

Roads

Total

 

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

Number of Prisoners in Gaol on 20 April 1868

33

12

84

13

8

2

1

1

1

127

28

Received during the month of May 1868

12

7

11

2

5

1

5

1

2

34

12

Total

45

19

95

15

13

3

6

1

1

2

1

161

40

Discharged during the month of May 1868

18

5

21

1

1

5

1

2

46

8

Total in Gaol on 21 May 1868

27

14

74

14

12

3

1

1

1

115

32

The Hon                                                         [Signed] Benjamin Lee, JP                   HM Gaol East Maitland 1st June 1868

the Colonial Secretary                                                Act. Visiting Justice                   [Signed] GH Stace, Gaoler

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Punishment Inflicted in HM East Maitland Gaol During May 1868 

Date

Name

Offence

Sentence

By whom ordered

May

6th

John Smith

Disrespectful Conduct towards the Gaoler

3 days cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

May

14th

Frederick Howard

Shaving a person without – orders

3 days cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

May

18th

Maria Holwell

Disobedience of orders

3 days cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

May

20th

Mary (Tommins ?)

Writing and passing a letter to a female prisoner in Separate confinement

5 days cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

May

20th

John Smith

Insolence to the Act. Visiting Justice

2 days cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

May

26th

William Wildman

Scratching the paint on his cell gate and Insolence to an Officer

2 days cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

May

21st

William Wildman

Insolence to an Officer

3 days (close at ?) ½ rations

The Gaoler

The Hon                                                      [Signed] Benjamin Lee, JP                                HM Gaol East Maitland 1st June 1868                                                                                      

the Colonial Secretary                                        Act. Visiting Justice                                    [Signed] GH Stace, Gaoler                                                                                                                                                                           

 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Benjamin Lee, Acting Visiting Justice of East Maitland Gaol Report to, Col Sec, Sydney, 1 Jul 1868 20

68/3523

[Received] 4th July 68

Monthly Report of the Visiting Justice of East Maitland Gaol to the Hon the Colonial Secretary for the Month of June 1868

HM Gaol East Maitland
1st July 1868

Sir,

[1] I have the honor to forward herewith enclosed The Monthly State of all Prisoners Confined [see table below] in this Gaol. Also a return of all Punishment [see table below] inflicted for offences in the Gaol.

2 The discipline of the Gaol has been carried out to the best of my knowledge, and belief, in strict accordance with the Rules and Regulations.

    I have the honour to be,
      Sir,
    Your Most obedient Servant.
[Signed] Benjamin Lee, JP
Acting Visiting Justice

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Inmates at East Maitland Gaol, 30 Jun 1868

 

Con-fine

Hard

Labor

For Trial

Remanded

Deb-tors

Luna-tics

For D’hurst

Roads

Total

 

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

Total number in Gaol on 31st May 1868

27

14

74

14

12

3

1

1

1

115

32

Received during the month of June 1868

13

7

26

2

1

2

2

44

9

Total

40

21

100

16

12

3

2

1

2

3

159

41

Discharged during the month of June 1868

12

2

22

3

10

3

2

1

2

3

1

51

10

Total in Gaol on 30 June 1868

28

19

78

13

2

(?)

108

31

The Hon                                                                 [Signed] Benjamin Lee, JP                   HM Gaol East Maitland 1st July 1868

the Colonial Secretary                                                       Act. Visiting Justice                   [Signed] GH Stace, Gaoler

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Punishment Inflicted in HM East Maitland Gaol During Jun 1868 
 

Date 1868

Name

Offence

Sentence

By whom ordered

June

9th

John Smith

Refusing to come before the V. Justice

7 days cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

June

11th

Mary Ann Evans

Disrespect to the Matron

24 hours cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

June

26th

John Joyce

Disrespectful conduct to the Vist. Surgeon

24 hours cells

The Act. Visiting Justice

 

 

John Smith

For violent conduct – in Irons for 6 hours on 9th of June

 

The Act. Visiting Justice

The Hon                                                                 [Signed] Benjamin Lee, JP                   HM Gaol East Maitland 1st July 1868

the Colonial Secretary                                                       Act. Visiting Justice                   [Signed] GH Stace, Gaoler

 


1     The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Thu 5 Sep 1867, p.4.

2     SRNSW: NRS880, [9/6501], Supreme Court, Papers and depositions, Maitland, 1867, No. 771. 

3     SRNSW: NRS5774, [2/2539] , Judiciary, A Cheeke, J. Notebooks Circuit Court, 1865-74, pp 1-4. Emphasis added. 

4     The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Tue 22 Oct 1867, p. 2.

5     The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Tue 29 Oct 1867, p. 2.

6     SRNSW: NRS5082, [12/1733] , Health, Parramatta psychiatric centre, Case papers (criminal), 1855-1962.

7     SRNSW: NRS5113, [4/8257] , Health, Parramatta psychiatric centre, Medical case books, 1848-1918, folio 313.

8     SRNSW: NRS905, [4/610] (67/7348), Col Sec, Letters received, 1826-1982.

9     Mn: The approval of His Excellency the Administrator of the Government is requisite. 24 Dec 67. [Initialled] Governor JY [Sir John Young] 30/12/67. Approved 2/1/68. Sheriff 3rd Jan 1868.

10   SRNSW: NRS905, [4/616]  (68/143), Col Sec, Letters received, 1826-1982. Emphasis added.

11   Mn: Were any of the four Male lunatics who have died, during the month, of the class of British Convicts? [initial illegible] 2nd 68. Notes 3/1/68. (?) (?) Superintendent Lunatic Asylum Parramatta.

12   SRNSW: NRS6034, [2/4481] , Judiciary, JF Hargrave, J. Notebooks Circuit Courts, 1865-81, pp. 5, 7-12. Emphasis added.

13   Justice John Fletcher Hargrave  born 28 Dec 1815 at Greenwich, England. Educated at King’s and Trinity colleges and Cambridge and called to the Bar in 1841. In Feb 1857 arrived from England in Sydney and became a foundation judge of the District Court. “According to Sir Alfred Stephen Hargrave’s judgeship was ‘disastrous for women suitors’ because he habitually decided against them, but otherwise he mastered his [mental health] disability.” In Feb 1859 Hargrave resigned from the bench and became solicitor-general. He also was a member of the NSW Parliamentary’s Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council. After gaining silk in 1863 he secured a place on the NSW Supreme Court bench on 22 Jun 1865. “He died 23 Feb 1885 from an ‘effusion on the brain’ and was buried in the Anglican section of [Sydney’s] Waverley cemetery.” ADB, 1851-1890, vol. 4, pp. 345-6.

14   Pathic: n. victim; catamite. [f. L f. Gk. pathikos – passive (as PATHOS)] Catamite: n. boy kept for homosexual practices; passive partner in sodomy. [f. L catamitus  thr. Etruscan f. Gk Ganumedes Ganymede, cupbearer of Zeus] – Australian Concise Oxford Dictionary .

15   The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser,  Tue 21 Apr 1868, p. 3.

16   SRNSW: NRS905, [4/626]  (68/2745), Col Sec, Letters received, 1826-1982.

17   Mn: This case is subject to the opinion of Mr [James] Martin [QC AG] This case was improperly laid before the Executive Council. Sentence of death appears to have been recorded against the Prisoner. – Now forwarded to the Hon the Colonial Secretary. [Signed] (?) (?) Clerk of the Executive Council [Initial illegible] 22/5/68.

18  Mn: Forwarding remarks of His Honor Judge Hargrave in reference to Commutation  of John Smith’s sentence. Judge Hargrave – Sheriff 2 June.

19   SRNSW: NRS905, [4/626]  (68/2887), Col Sec, Letters received, 1826-1982. Emphasis added.

20   SRNSW: NRS905, [4/628]  (68/3523), Col Sec, Letters received, 1826-1982. Emphasis added.