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1876, Richard Sexton - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: Richard Sexton, 1881,
Richard Sexton, 1885

Evening News, Mon 24 Jan 1876 1

EXCESSIVE PUNISHMENT
————
OF CHILDREN AT THE RANDWICK ASYLUM.
————

Destitute Children’s Asylum, Randwick, Sydney, 1866. Image: Vic State Library collection, H15193. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Destitute Children’s Asylum, Randwick, Sydney, 1866. Image:
Vic State Library collection, H15193. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

THE disclosure which have been made in the Police Courts during the past week, in regard to the ill-reatment of children at the Destitute Children’s Asylum at Randwick, formed a subject of a two hours’ discussion in the Legislative Assembly on Friday evening. The Colonial Secretary informed the House that Police-superintendant Read and the Inspector of Charities had, at the request of the Government, examined the boys of the institution, and had reported that many of them had been flogged in an unmerciful manner. Below will be found a letter from Mr E Fosbery, Inspector-General of Police, and reports from the Inspector of Charities and Superintendent Read.

    Mr Fosbery’s letter, forwarding the reports, is as follows:— “As desired by the Attorney-General, Superintendent Read, accompanied the Inspector of Charities to Randwick, and examined all the boys (347). Thirty-three showed marks of unduly severe punishment, some inflicted three months ago. The boys had not only been punished by [James] Sproule, but by other servants of the institution. The instrument called a ‘cat’, used by Sproule, is in the possession of the police—E F.”

    The following is Mr Fullerton’s report to the Principal Under-Secretary: —

“Office of Inspector of Public Charities,
“Hyde Park, Sydney, January 21.

    “Sir,—In accordance with instructions contained in your letter of 20th instant, I proceeded to the Rand-wick Asylum this morning, and in conjunction with Mr. Superintendent Read made a personal examination of the children, with the result as appended. The book-roll was 360 boys and 263 girls. Thirteen boys are away, some absconded, and some in the hands of the police. We personally examined 347 boys, and found 34 more or less bruised by beating. A detailed account, showing all particulars we could gather, is appended.

    “I spoke to more than fifty of the older girls and they all acknowledge being slapped on the hands occasionally, but not unless they deserve it. Some four or five say they have been beaten on the back, but only three or four strokes with a small cane.

    “Three of the infant boys have had a most unmerciful flogging, but they say it was given to them by the girls told off to assist in the nursery, and not by the officers or servants.

    “There must have been a very great want of proper supervision, or the state of things now existing could never have happened. If the superior officers of the asylum had done their duty, they must have discovered that corporal punishment was a common practice with the subordinate officers. If the information as to Mr Craddock is correct, he is not fit to be in the institution. Mr White had left before Sproule was appointed, about eight weeks ago. Sproule is already committed for trial. 2

    “In my report of 17th instant, I said that corporal punishment should only be administered by the superintendent, or by his order in his presence. If the directors of an institution cannot compel that, I see nothing for it but to repress the use of corporal punishment by subordinate officers by legislative enactment. In justice to the superintendent, I must say that he has been almost laid up for some time back. With the exception of the marks mentioned, the appearance of the children is healthy and clean.

“I have the honour, &c.,
“GEORGE FULLERTON, Inspector of Public Charities.
“The Principal Under Secretary.”
————

    The following is a detailed account of the punishments inflicted on the 34 children referred to in Mr Fosbery’s report, giving the names of the children, their age, the name of the person by whom the beating was inflicted, the nature of the offence committed by the boys, and the visible effects of the beating:—

    “17. Richard Sexton, 9; beaten by Sproule and Craddock, three weeks ago, Sproule first ; offence—out of bounds both times, marks on buttocks severe.” 

 



Richard Sexton
, 1881

 

Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Thu 27 Jan 1881 3

GOULBURN ITEMS.
————


    At the Police Court yesterday, before the Police-Magistrate, Richard Sexton, was charged with absconding from the fired service of Patrick Gooley, Towrang. Constable Marshall arrested the prisoner, who stated he was lonesome minding sheep. Remanded to Friday next.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Sat 29 Jan 1881 4

GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
Friday, January 28.

BEFORE the Police-Magistrate and Mr Chas Cropper.

    Richard Sexton, a lad about 14, was brought up on remand for absconding from his apprenticeship with Patrick Gooley, who stated that defendant had absconded from him three times; he had neglected to look after some sheep, and on one occasion they got into his cultivation paddock when he left them.

    The Bench ordered that defendant should be placed in solitary confinement on bread and water for three days.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle, Sat 29 Jan 1881 5

GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
Thursday, January 27.

BEFORE the police-magistrate.

Friday, January 28.

    Before the police-magistrate and Mr Charles Cropper.

    Richard Sexton, aged fourteen years, was charged with absconding from his apprenticeship to Patrick Gooley.

    The boy stated that he ran away because he did not like the job of shepherding. It also appeared that he did not look properly after the sheep, and had run away twice before.

    Defendant was ordered to be confined in a solitary cell in Goulburn jail for three days on bread and water.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Tue 12 Apr 1881 6

GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
Monday, April 11.

BEFORE Mr Alexander, JP.

Tuesday, April 12.

    Before Mr CS Alexander, and Mr Cropper.

    Richard Sexton a lad about 14, was charged with ill-behaviour as an apprentice, and absenting himself from the service of Patrick Gooley.

    Senior Constable Gall arrested the prisoner on warrant (produced) at Stair Hill, yesterday; he was then working for Robt. Payten, and told him he did not want to go back to mind sheep, he was willing to work.

    Mr Payten told Constable Gall that prisoner was a good lad, and he would willingly take him.

    Patrick Gooley, not having the indentures with him, the case was remanded till Thursday next, in the meantime the Randwick Authorities were to be communicated with.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Herald, Wed 13 Apr 1881 7

GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
Tuesday, April 12.

BEFORE Messrs Alexander and Cropper.

    Absconding Apprentice.—Richard Sexton, a smart looking lad between fourteen and fifteen years of age, was charged with absconding from the service of Patrick Gooley to whom he had been apprenticed from the Randwick asylum. It appeared that he ran away from his master’s place, about three miles from Goulburn, on the 6th March, and on Monday he was apprehended by Senior-constable Gall at Stair Hill, eight miles from away because he did not like shepherding, it was too lazy, and he wanted to get somewhere where he could have some work to do.

    Mr Paton stated to the constable that he was willing to keep him and that he was a good boy. The boy’s master Patrick Gooley informed the bench that he did not wish to have the boy back, as he could get no good of him at shepherding. He had been with him about three years. He had not the indentures with him.

    The bench were in doubt as to the course to pursue, as sufficient power is not given to deal with cases of this kind. They remanded the boy till Thursday, in order that they might write to the authorities of the Randwick asylum in reference to the case. Mr Cropper left the bench.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Thu 14 Apr 1881 8

GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
Wednesday, April 13.

BEFORE Messrs Conolly and Alexander.

————
Thursday, April 14th.

    Before Messrs Wm Conolly and CS Alexander.

    Richard Sexton, a boy 14½ years of age on remand was charged by Patrick Gooley with absconding from his apprenticeship.

    From the evidence it appears that the boy was apprenticed to complainant from the Randwick Asylum nearly three years ago; the defendant objected to look after sheep, and was disobedient in many ways, he had been brought up before for misconduct and was sentenced to three days’ solitary confinement.

    As complainant wished, the indentures were cancelled by the Bench, and the boy sentenced to three days’ solitary confinement.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Herald, Sat 16 Apr 1881 9

GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
Wednesday Afternoon.

BEFORE Mr CS Alexander.

————
Thursday, April 14.

    Before Messrs Conolly and Alexander.

    Absconding Apprentice.—Richard Sexton on remand was charged with absconding from his apprenticeship to Patrick Gooley.

    The boy appeared to have been neglecting his duty for some time and leaving the sheep he had to look after. On a previous occasion a warrant had been taken out against him and he was sent to jail for three days in solitary confinement, and in March he absconded.

    His master said he would do nothing, and wished the indentures to be cancelled.

    The bench sentenced defendant to three days’ solitary confinement in Goulburn jail and his indentures to be cancelled.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Herald, Wed 20 Apr 1881 10

GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
Tuesday, April 19.

BEFORE Mr CS Alexander.

    Before Messrs King and CS Alexander.

    Indentures Transferred.—Richard Sexton, who had been sent to jail for three days for absenting himself from the service of Patrick Gooley, was now brought up for protection, and Mr Miller of Tarago offering to take him, the indentures were ordered to be transferred to him.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Thu 21 Apr 1881 11

GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
Tuesday, April 19.

BEFORE Mr CS Alexander.

    The lad, Richard Sexton, who our readers will remember was brought up last week for absconding from his apprenticeship, and the bench cancelled his indentures, was handed over to Mr Miller of Tarago, who agreed to take him for the balance of the term for which he was apprenticed.

    The court then adjourned.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Sat 23 Apr 1881 12

GOULBURN ITEMS.
————


    The boy Richard Sexton, that had previously absconded from Mr Gooley, has at last been placed in the hands of Mr Kelly, of Clifford-street. On Tuesday last when brought before the police court Mr Miller, of Tarago, agreed to take him for the remainder of his apprenticeship term, and attended yesterday for the purpose of having the indentures transferred to him, but from a telegram read by the bench from the Randwick authorities, from where the boy was originally apprenticed, a wish was expressed that the boy, being a Roman Catholic, should be apprenticed to a person of the same persuasion. On the recommendation of Mr W Davies, Mr Kelly was entrusted with the lad, and indentures were prepared accordingly.

 



Richard Sexton
, 1885

 

Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Sat 14 Feb 1885 13

QUEANBEYAN.
(Abridged from the Age.)
POLICE COURT.—Tuesday, Feb 10th.

BEFORE the Police Magistrate and Messrs JJ Wright and O Williams.

STEALING A BUGGY.

    Andrew Schofield was charged with having on the 22nd of January last feloniously stolen a buggy from the premises of Thomas Wilson.

    Mr Gannon watched the case for the accused.

    After the evidence of Thomas Wilson, John Wilson, Charles Scott, and Constable Emmett had been taken, the further hearing of the case was, on the application of the senior-sergeant, adjourned indefinitely for the production of two witnesses named Edward Walsh and Richard Sexton.

    The accused was admitted to bail in £80 and two sureties each of £40.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Sat 21 Feb 1885 14

QUEANBEYAN.
(Abridged from the Age.)

Bungendore railway station. Image: Australian Town and Country Journal, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 11 Apr 1885, p. 755. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Bungendore railway station. Image: Australian Town and Country
Journal, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 11 Apr 1885, p. 755.
Reproduction: Peter de Waal

POLICE COURT, Monday.

    Before Mr O Williams.

    Tuesday.—Before the Police Magistrate.

    Andrew Schofield was charged with having, on the 22nd of January last, feloniously stolen a buggy from the premises of Thomas Wilson.

    Mr Gannon watched the ease for the accused.

    The evidence taken on the previous Tuesday was read over, and additional testimony was given by Richard Sexton (Mr Moran’s groom at Bungendore) and Edward Walsh (a laborer in the employ of Mr John Moran at Bungendore).

    His Worship—I discharge the accused, there being no evidence to connect him with the theft.

 


1     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 24 Jan 1877, p. 4. Emphasis added.

2     See for example “Water Police Court, Wednesday,” in: The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Thu 20 Jan 1876, p. 7.

3     Goulburn Evening Penny Post, (NSW), Thu 27 Jan 1881, p. 2.

4     Goulburn Evening Penny Post, (NSW), Sat 29 Jan 1881, p. 2.

5     The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle, (NSW), Sat 29 Jan 1881, p. 2.

6     Goulburn Evening Penny Post, (NSW), Tue 12 Apr1881, p. 2.

7     Goulburn Herald, (NSW), Wed 13 Apr 1881, p. 2.

8     Goulburn Evening Penny Post, (NSW), Thu 14 Apr1881, p. 2.

9     Goulburn Herald, (NSW), Sat 16 Apr 1881, p. 2.

10   Goulburn Herald, (NSW), Wed 20 Apr 1881, p. 2.

11   Goulburn Evening Penny Post, (NSW), Thu 21 Apr1881, p. 2.

12   Goulburn Evening Penny Post, (NSW), Sat 23 Apr1881, p. 2.

13   Goulburn Evening Penny Post, (NSW), Sat 14 Feb 1885, p. 6. Emphasis added.

14   Goulburn Evening Penny Post, (NSW), Sat 21 Feb 1885, p. 6. Emphasis added.