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1865, Michael Furey - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: Michael Furey, 1867,
Michael Furey, 1869

 

Empire, Thu 12 Oct 1865 1

CENTRAL POLICE COURT.—Wednesday.
————
(Before their Worships the Police Magistrate,
and Messrs Love, and Raper.)


    Michael Fuery [sic] was committed to take his trial at the next sittings of the Central Criminal Court, charged with an unnatural crime(a capital offence).

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 12 Oct 1865 2

CENTRAL POLICE COURT.
Wednesday.

BEFORE the Police Magistrate, with Messrs Love and Raper.

    Of fourteen prisoners brought before the Court, six were discharged.

    Robert Byrne, charged with having stolen a hammer, valued at 3s 6d, the property of J Gowan, pleaded guilty. To be imprisoned three months.

    Elizabeth Davis was sentenced to be imprisoned seven days, and Robert Templeton, Thomas Clare, and Elizabeth Young were severally sentenced to pay 10s, or to be ímprisoned forty-eight hours, for riotous and disorderly conduct.

    Elizabeth Doran, charged with having damaged the window of William Phillips, by wilfully breaking four squares of glass, was ordered to pay 4s. the value of the glass, or to be imprisoned twenty-four hours.

    John Williams, found guilty of indecent conduct on Hyde Park, was sentenced to be imprisoned fourteen days.

    Michael Furey was committed to take his trial for bestiality.

    On the summons paper were ten cases, one of which was postponed, four were struck out, and in one a warrant was ordered for the apprehension of the defendant. Two orders were made under the Deserted Wives’ Act—in Miller v. Miller, for 10s a week, and Cale v. Cale, for 15s. a week; no defence was offered in either case. In Doran v. Wedderburn, for the recovery of wages, an order was made for payment of the amount claimed.

    The Roster.—Messrs Levey, Dangar, Smithers, Birrell, and Thorne have been summoned for Bench duty on Thursday.

 



Michael Furey
, 1867

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 25 Apr 1867 3

CENTRAL POLICE COURT.
Wednesday.

BEFORE their Worships the Police Magistrate, Messrs Raper, Egan, and Pearce.

    Of twenty-five prisoners brought before the Court, two were discharged and four were remanded.

    Henry Carr Glynn and Robert Millington were charged with having obtained goods by means of false pretences. Thomas Earl, son of John Joseph Earl, of Bathurst-street, timber dealer, and assisting him in his business, deposed that on Thursday, the 11th April, the defendants came to the yard, and Glynn made inquiry about the price of shingles, which he (witness) told him was 13s 6d. per 1000, Glynn said that he was repairing a store at the back of the Fortune of War public house, Lower George street and would take 20,000 at 13s; witness agreed to let him have 20,000 at 13s, but made no arrangement about terms of payment, not intending to send them until he had spoken to his father about the matter.

    On cross-examination by Glynn, witness said that on delivery of the first load of shingles, on Friday the 12th, Glynn said that he would make one payment for the whole on completion of the order, on Saturday afternoon, the order having been completed, he presented a bill for the whole, and Glyun replied that if, on examination, the shingles were found to be all right, he would come on Monday and pay the amount.

    On cross-examination byMr Carroll, for Millington, the witness said that Millington took no part in the transaction.

    John James Earl, timber dealer, deposed that his son told him of a sale of 20,000 shingles on Thursday, the 11th April, on Friday, Millington came to him and asked why it was that the shingles had not been sent, when witness replied that he wished first to know how he was to be paid; Millington replied, “Cash as soon as they are delivered,” adding, “We have taken premises next the Fortune of War, Lower George-street, and want the shingles to repair the roof;” on the faith of these representations he gave directions for the delivery of the shingles, Millington, on the occasion referred to, told him to make out the account in the name of Captain Glynn; produced receipts for the shingles signed “Henry Carr Glynn;” (defendant Glynn admitted that he gave the receipts;) on Wednesday, the 17th, saw Glynn, demanded payment for the shingles, and said that, unless he paid the money, he would take out a warrant for him.

    Charles Jones deposed that he is owner of premises next the Fortune of War, George-street, some of which are undergoing repair, and the erection of other part is not completed; a person named Davis is in his employ to look after the premises; on Monday last he paid Davis £13-10s for 20,000 shingles he had purchased; neither of the prisoners occupies any portion of his premises, his tenants do not repair the roofs.

    Joseph Davis deposed that on Saturday he paid the defendant Glynn £13-10s for 20,000 shingles he had purchased of him, and produced his receipt for the money. Committed for trial. Bail allowed—Glynn in £200, and two sureties in £100 each, and Millington in £100, with two sureties in £50 each. Mr Forster conducted the prosecution.

    James May was found guilty of having assaulted Thomas Harris, a bailiff, who, in the execution of his duty, distrained for rent upon defendant’s goods, and was sentenced to pay a penalty of 40s , or to be imprisoned one month.

    John Jones, alias Denham, was also sentenced to pay 40s, or to he imprisoned one month, for having assaulted constable Downes.

    Margaret Wymes and John O’Connor, charged as idle and disorderly persons, were sentenced to be imprisoned one month, on failure to show that they have either places of abode or lawful means of support.

    Michael Furey and David Ferguson were fined—the first 5s., and the other 40s., for making use of obscene language in public places.

 



Michael Furey
, 1869

 

Empire, Fri 2 Apr 1869 4

CENTRAL POLICE COURT.—Thursday.
(Before Captain Scott, PM; Messrs Alderson, Levey, Pinhey, Barnard, Birrell, and Smithers.)

    John Randall, William Blenmore, and Edward Randall, charged with assaulting Patrick McGarvey, were remanded until Thursday next.

    Michael Furey was charged with stealing a gold watch and chain, of the value of £5, the property of Charles Bennington, of Burwood. It appeared that on the 30th ultimo the house of the prosecutor was in his absence broken into, and a watch and chain stolen.

    Mr Barnett, pawnbroker, deposed that on Tuesday last the prisoner brought the watch to his shop and wanted to pawn or sell it. He (witness) gave information to the police, and the prisoner was arrested, the watch being found in his possession at the time.

    Charles Bennington, of Burwood, gentleman, deposed that the watch produced is his property. Prisoner, who denied the charge, was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 2 Apr 1869 5

CENTRAL POLICE COURT.
Thursday.

BEFORE their Worships Messrs Levey, Pinhey, Birrell, Smithers, Alderson, and Barnard.

    Of twenty-one prisoners who were brought before the Bench, seven were discharged, and four were remanded.

    Two persons were fined 5s, each, and three were fined 10s each, for drunkenness.

    Michael Furey was charged with stealing in a dwelling.

    Constable Higgins deposed that on the 30th March he apprehended the prisoner at Barnett’s pawn office, and charged him with having stolen a gold watch and chain; received the watch and chain from Barnett in prisoner’s presence.

    Charles Binnington, of Burwood, gentleman, deposed that on Monday last his house was broken into and robbed; the watch and chain produced, his property, and worth £10, were taken from a drawer.

    Charles Barnett, of Pottinger-street, Sydney, pawnbroker, deposed that on Tuesday evening the prisoner offered to him the watch and chain produced; they corresponded with similar articles reported to him as having been stolen, and he sent for the police. Committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

~ ~~ ~ ~

Sydney Mail, Sat 3 Apr 1869 6

POLICE.
————
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.

BEFORE the City Magistrates.

Tuesday.

Thursday.

    Michael Furey was charged with stealing in a dwelling. Constable Biggins deposed that on the 30th March he apprehended the prisoner at Barnett’s pawn office, and charged him with having stolen a gold watch and chain; received the watch and chain from Barnett in prisoner’s pretence.

    Charles Binnington, of Burwood, gentleman, deposed that on Monday last his house was broken into and robbed; the watch and chain produced, his property, and worth £10, were taken from a drawer.

    Charles Barnett, of Pottinger-street, Sydney, pawnbroker, deposed that on Tuesday evening the prisoner offered to him the watch and chain produced; they corresponded with similar articles reported to him as having been stolen, and he sent for the police. Committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Empire, Wed 7 Apr 1869 7

QUARTER SESSIONS.—Tuesday.
(Before his Honor Mr District Judge Dowling.)

STEALING FROM A DWELLING.

    Michael Furey pleaded not guilty to stealing a gold watch and chain, the properly of Charles Bennington, of Burwood. Prisoner was undefended. On Easter Monday, 29th ultimo, prosecutor went with his family to the races, leaving his house locked up. On his return he found that his house had been broken into, and a watch and chain stolen. He at once gave information to the police. Next day prisoner took the watch produced to Mr Barnett’s pawn broker’s shop, in Pottinger-street, and offered to pawn or sell it. Barnett having previously had a report that the watch had been stolen, detained the watch and sent for a constable who took prisoner into custody. Prisoner refused to say how he became possessed of the watch and chain. Mr Bennington identified the watch and chain produced as his property. The jury found the prisoner guilty, and he was sentenced to eighteen months’ hard labour in Sydney gaol.

 


1     Empire, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 12 Oct 1865, p. 3.

2     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Thu 12 Oct 1865, p. 5. Emphasis added.

3     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Thu 25 Apr 1867, p. 2. Emphasis added.

4     Empire, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 2 Apr 1869, p. 3. Emphasis added.

5     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Fri 2 Apr 1869, p. 2. Emphasis added.

6     Sydney Mail, (NSW), Sat 3 Apr 1869, p. 14.

7     Empire, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 7 Apr 1869, p. 3.