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1878, Henry Ryan - Unfit For Publication
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Evening News, Fri 14 Jun 1878 1

CAPTURE OF A NOTORIOUS
CRIMINAL.

    Our Wellington correspondent under date June 12, writes as follows:—Senior-constable Chiplin and a mounted trooper lodged a notorious aboriginal, named Henry Roan, [Henry Ryan], in the lock-up, charged with committing an unnatural offence in Nanima paddock. The persons who detected him in the act went after him, but he faced them and began pelting stones at them. He then took off his coat and ran away from them. Information was given to the police, who went in pursuit, but as they were on horseback he eluded them. On Saturday evening Mr Chiplin thought he, with Constable Roberts and a blackfellow, would try it on foot, and they heard of him being seen in a paddock about six miles from Wellington, warming himself at one of the fires where they are burning off the timber, so the constables searched carefully till constable Chiplin discovered him crouched beside a log. When discovered he made a spring, but the constable was on him, and they both fell, but before he could rise Chiplin had him coupled by the wrist to himself. By this time Roberts came up, and this desperate character, who, it appears, done five years not long since for attempted murder, and whom all the blacks and many of the whites were afraid of, was secured. The constables deserve credit for this clever capture.

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Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser, Tue 25 Jun 1878 2


    CAPTURE OF NOTORIOUS CRIMINAL.—The Wellington correspondent of the Evening News under date June 12, writes as follows:—Senior-constable Chiplin and a mounted trooper lodged a notorious aboriginal, named Henry Roan, in the lock-up, charged with committing an unnatural offence in Namina paddock. The persons who detected him in the act went after him, but he faced them and began pelting stones at them. He then took off his coat and ran away from them. Information was given to the police, who went in pursuit, but as they were on horseback he eluded them. On Saturday evening Mr Chiplin thought he, with Constable Roberts and a blackfellow, would try it on foot, and they heard of him being seen in a paddock about six miles from Wellington, warming himself at one of the fires where they are burning off the timber, so the constables searched carefully till constable Chiplin discovered him crouched beside a log. When discovered he made a spring, but the constable was on him, and they both fell, but before he could rise Chiplin had him coupled by the wrist to himself. By this time Roberts came up, and this desperate character, who, it appears, done five years not long since for attempted murder, and whom all the blacks and many of the whites were afraid of, was secured. The constables deserve credit for this clever capture.

    When is a man thinner than a shingle?—When he’s a shaving.

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Evening News, Sat 17 Aug 1878 3

WELLINGTON QUARTER SESSIONS.

    WELLINGTON, Saturday.—The Court of Quarter Sessions commenced on Wednesday, and were concluded yesterday. Judge Josephson presided. The following are the convictions and sentences:—
    John Cooke, horsestealing, two charges, two years in Bathurst Gaol;
    James Jeffries, a French-man, larceny, nine months in Wellington Gaol;
    Frederick B A Dowling, forgery, two years in Darlinghurst Gaol;
    John Hennessy, fraudulent insolvency, two years in Bathurst Gaol;
    Thomas Rutter and Lawrence Doherty, charged with cattle stealing, were acquitted;
    Henry Ryan, a black- fellow, unmentionable offence, one year in Bathurst Gaol;
    James Hicknott, charged with sheep stealing, was acquitted.
    Two cases were remanded till the next sittings of the court.—
    Very heavy rain fell on Wednesday night and on Thursday morning.

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The Sydney Mail and NSW Advertiser, Sat 24 Aug 1878 4

WELLINGTON.

August 19.

    The rain has not yet left us. On the 15th we had a very heavy fall; again on the 17th it was showery all day. There is every indication of an early spring; the willows are putting forth their delicate pale green foliage; the golden wattle gleams on the mountain side; the orchards are enveloped in a pinky cloud, from which we almost expect to see the goddess of the spring emerge in all her youthful beauty; every mountain gorge is brilliant with its miniature cascade; all nature is rejoicing in her brightest garb for her renewed youth.

    On the 13th the District Court was opened; but there were no cases.

Post Office (and Courthouse), Wellington, NSW, c. 1870-1875. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Post Office (and Courthouse), Wellington, NSW, c. 1870-1875.
Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    On the 14th the Quarter Sessions, presided over by his Honor Judge Josephson, commenced. Mr J J Teece prosecuted on behalf of the Crown. The barristers present were Messrs Heydon, Barton, Smythe; attorneys: Messrs Johnson, James, Chauncy.

The following cases were disposed of:—

    John Cook pleaded guilty to two charges of horse-stealing; sentence, two years.

    BJ French, charged with stealing in a dwelling, pleaded not guilty; verdict, guilty; nine months in Wellington gaol.

    F B R Dowling was found guilty of forging and uttering; sentence, two years.

    John Hennessey, charged with fraudulent insolvency; this case lasted all one day; verdict, guilty; two years.

    Henry Ryan, man of colour, unnatural offence; guilty; twelve months.

    Daniel McKimerick, grievous bodily harm, postponed till next session.

    Tee Ing Sing, a Chinese, charged with arson, was found to be insane.

    James Hickmort, charged with sheep-stealing; verdict, not guilty.

    Thomas Rutter and Lawrence Doherty, charged with cattie-stealing; this case excited a considerable amount of interest, and lasted the whole day; Mr Heydon defended the prisoner Rutter; he had previously defended Hickmort; after a long and patient investigation, a verdict of not guilty was returned.

    This closed the list of cases.

    Messrs. Ferguson’s mill had a narrow escape of being burnt down last Friday night. Smoke was observed coming from the mill between 11 and 12 o’clock; the alarm was given, and it was found coming from the smutting-room, the floor of which was burning. Assistance being quickly rendered, it was soon got under without much loss. It is supposed to have arisen through the heating of some damaged wheat.

    The weather is now fine and clear.

 


1     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 14 Jun 1878, p. 2. Emphasis added.

2     Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser, (Grafton, NSW), Tue 25 Jun 1878, p. 3. Emphasis added.

3     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 17 Aug 1878, p. 4. Emphasis added.

4     The Sydney Mail and NSW Advertiser, (NSW), Sat 24 Aug 1878, p. 313.