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1867, George Moffitt and Thomas Walton - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: George Wilson, 1874,
John Waters and George White, 1880,
George Wilson, 1888

The Bathurst Times, Wed 12 Feb 1868 1

QUARTER SESSIONS.

The above Court opened on Monday last, before his Honor Mr District Judge Carey
    MR CHAMBERS prosecuted for the Crown
...

FORGING AND UTTERING.

    Thomas Walker [aka Thomas Walton] and George Moffitt [aka George Wilson, &c] pleaded Guilty—the former for forging and the latter of uttering—in five different indictments for forging and uttering on the 9th December last, five several cheques upon the Bank of New South Wales, for the sums of £3, £2 17s, £3, ,2 19s, and £3, with intend to defraud.

    Remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

George White, Gaol photo sheet 2

SRNSW: NRS2232, [3/5969A], Goulburn Gaol photographic description book, Dec 1884-May 1890, No. 461, p. 27, R5119.

 


Gaol Photo Sheet - Transcribed Details

Number on Gaol Register: 461
G[oulburn]

Portrait Taken:-

Name: George White
(aka George Nelson, George Moffatt, George Wilson)


Native place: Sydney

Year of birth: 1845

Arrived        Ship: BC 
in Colony }   Year: 

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Bootmaker

Religion: Ch of Eng

Education, degree of: R&W

Height: 5' 5½"

Weight     On committal: 138 lbs
in lbs     }  On discharge: 

Colour of hair: Brown to Grey

Colour of eyes: Brown

Marks or Special Features:  


Where and when tried: Sydney Q.S., Orange Q.S.

8th April, 13 March 1880
Offence: Stealing in a dwelling; Forgery and uttering
Sentence: 5 yrs and 8 years Concurrent

Remarks: Plea Guilty.
Convicted with John Waters
Guilty of uttering.

 

 (No. of previous Portrait ... 124 Bathurst ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Bathurst

ditto

Bourke Q.S

Liverpool PC

ditto

Water PC

Sydney GD

  10

  11

    8

  10

   3

    1

  14

2

5

11

7

9

4

11

1868

1874

1877

1885

1885

1887

1888

Forgery and Uttering

Receiving stolen property

Larceny

Unlawfully on premises

Stealing a till

Suspected person

Buggery

5 years Roads

3 years Roads

2 years H.L.

7 days C.

1 month C. Parramatta

6 months HL

14 yrs P.S.

 


 

George Wilson, 1874

Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 9 May 1874 3

BATHURST.

...

Monday.

    At the Circuit Court, to-day, Samuel Alfred Jones, for sticking up the Cowra mail at Mittens Creek, was convicted; John Larkin, alias Francis McGuin arraigned for horse-stealing at Gulgong, was found guilty of receiving; George Wilson, arraigned for larceny at Bathurst, was found guilty of receiving. Sentences: Larking to six months' hard labour in Bathurst gaol, and Wilson to three years on the roads.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

George Wilson, Gaol photo sheet 4

SRNSW: NRS1998, [3/5955], Bathurst Gaol photographic description book, 1874-1930, No. 124, p. 119, R5084.

Gaol Photo Sheet - Transcribed Details

Number on Gaol Register: 124
B[athurst]

Portrait Taken:- 12th December 1877

Name: George Wilson
(aka George Moffatt, George White)


Native place: Sydney NSW

Year of birth: 1847

Arrived        Ship:
in Colony }   Year: 

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Shoemaker

Religion: Church of England

Education, degree of: R&W

Height: 5' 5½"

Weight     On committal: 124
in lbs     }  On discharge: 

Colour of hair: Brown to balding

Colour of eyes: Hazel

Marks or Special Features:  


Where and when tried: Bourke Q.S.
8 Nov 1877
Offence: Larceny
Sentence: Two years hard labour in Bathurst Gaol
Remarks:

 

(No. of previous Portrait ... 461 Goulburn ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Bathurst [Q.S]

Bathurst [CC]

Sydney Q.S

Orange Q.S

 

Sydney GD

  10

    4

    8

  13

  28

  14

2

5

4

5

11

11

1868

1874

1880

1880

1880

1888

Forgery and Uttering (5 charges)

Receiving stolen property

Stealing jewellery

Forgery

To Berrima Gaol

Buggery

5 years H.L. on the Roads

3 years H.L. on the Roads

5 years Roads

8 years Roads

  

14 yrs P.S.

 



John Waters and George White, 1880

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 3 Apr 1880 5

POLICE.
———o———
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.


     Yesterday the sitting justices, in addition to the Police Magistrate, were Messrs Jolly, Reading, Thomas, Skarratt, Neale, Barden, Withers, and Connell.
...

WATER POLICE COURT.


   Yesterday the Water Police Magistrate and Messrs Lester, Goodridge, Vincent, Brown, and Fowler presided.
...
    John Waters, alias Henry Bouvenden, and George White, alias Wilson, alias Turner, alias Moffitt, alias See, were both committed to Quarter Sessions for feloniously stealing a gold watch, chain and locket, and one silk vest, value in all about £10 the property of Robert Weir.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 8 Apr 1880 6

POLICE.
———o———
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.

   Yesterday the Police Magistrate was assisted in the Crime Court by Messrs Renwick, Sladen, Booth, Callaghan, and McBeath; and in the Summons Court by Messrs Chapman, Hardie, Guy, Solomon, Carpenter, and Hunt.
...

WATER POLICE COURT.


    The justices presiding on the Bench, yesterday, were Messrs Palmer, V Brown, H Moses, and McCoy.

    John Waters, alias Henry Boutandem, [sic] alias Reinhardt, and George White, (who rejoices in the possession of a number of aliases) were charged with stealing a watch and albert chain, a locket, and £1 10s in money, the property of Harry Chadderton. The prisoners have already been committed for trial on three charges of a similar nature to the above, and as a matter of fact, no less than nineteen charges of "hotel barbering" have been preferred against them, by the police. Harry Cladderton, [sic] plumber, deposed that he was staying at the ASN Hotel, in George-street, on the night of the 1st of March; he identified as his property the watch, chain, and locket found upon the prisoner White which he valued altogether at £12 or £15; he retired to bed at half-past 10 o'clock, having previously locked his bedroom door, and when he awoke at half-past 5 the following morning, his watch, chain and locket and the money were missing; the door of the bedroom had apparently been unfastened from the inside of the room, without any violence being used; there was a candlestick on the floor near the foot of the bed, which was not there when he retired to rest the previous night; he was of opinion that the thief or thieves must have been concealed underneath his bed. Matilda Dumbleor, a servant employed at the hotel in question, stated that the prisoner Waters engaged a bed on the night of the 1st March; he was shown up stairs, and a room opposite to that occupied by Chadderton was allotted to him; when she arose at five o'clock the following morning, she found the back door and gate unfastened, and Waters had left the premises. The prisoners were arrested at Orange on the 12th March by constable Daly, and the missing property was found upon them. The prisoners had nothing to urge in answer to the charge, and they were fully committed to take their trial at the Quarter Sessions commencing on the 31st May.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 9 Apr 1880 7

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
TURSDAY.
(Before his Honor Judge Josephson.)

    The Court reopened at 10 o'clock. Mr Wilkinson prosecuted for the Crown.

JURORS FINED.

    The following jurors were fined 40s each, for non-attendance: AJ Vickers, Timothy Curley, Robert Anderson, and Thomas Corbett.

PLEADED GUILTY.

    John Waters and George White pleaded guilty to a charge that they did, on the 15th of February last, steal, take, and carry away from the dwelling-house of Robert Weir, a watch, chain, locket, and vest, of the value of £10 10s. The same prisoners also pleaded guilty to another charge, that, on the 5th April, they did steal, take, and carry away from the dwelling-house of James Perkins one watch, one locket, one chain, and money to the amount of £4 3s 6d; and to three other charges of stealing from Mr Perkins' hotel. Prisoners were remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 12 Apr 1880 8

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
SATURDAY.

    The Court re-opened at 10 o'clock, before his Honor Judge JOSEPHSON.
...

SENTENCES.

...
    John Waters and George White, who pleaded guilty to several charges of stealing from a dwelling, were brought up for sentence. Waters had been several times previously convicted, but there was nothing against White. Prisoners were only punished for two offences, and for these each received a sentence "to be kept to hard labour on the roads, or other works of the colony, for five years," on each charge, the sentences to be concurrent.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 22 May 1880 9

ORANGE.

May 19.

    QUARTER SESSIONS:—The quarter sessions opened on Thursday last, before Judge Wilkinson. There were 12 cases down for trial. Mr JJ Teece was the only barrister present, whilst the attorneys were represented by Messrs JC McLachlan, G De V Pilcher, G Towson, J Dwyer, and — A'Beckett. The calendar on this occasion was the heaviest for many years past, and occupied three days.
...
    George White and Harry Walters [sic], found guilty of forging, were respectively sentenced to eight and five years' hard labour on the roads. The prisoners are at present undergoing a sentence for the robbery of jewellery at the Exchange Hotel, Sydney
...
    THE COURT-HOUSE.—During the quarter sessions great inconvenience was experienced on account of the inadequacy of the apology of a court-house we have to give accommodation. The witnesses were compelled to huddle up in a corner, whilst the unfortunate jurymen were obliged to stand the whole day.

 



George Wilson, 1888

 

Justice WJ Foster's notebook 11  12 

1

Darlinghurst Criminal Court
Wednesday November 14th 1888
George Wilson 3 November Liverpool. Sodomy —
Plea not guilty.
Cohen for Crown.

    Henry Barker. Constable Liverpool. Arrested prisoner 3rd November Scott Street, Liverpool. Charged him with Buggery on young Albert Miller. He wasn't drunk, not sober. Seemed to understand. He resided at Liverpool some little time.

2

    Albert Miller. Live at Liverpool with father & mother. Not known him long. 1st saw him on a Saturday, don't know day of month. Jim Beale & Willy Brown were with me in the evening about 5 pm behind Donald's in George Street. He said go on down street & I'll come down after you. I'll give you ½ crown. We three went down into the bush. He came to us. My foot caught in a root in the ground. I fell. He pushed me a little over. He undid my trowsers. He undid his. I was lying on my

3

back. I tried to get up. He turned me over on my face. I felt something in my back here (points to anus). I felt his diddle — here. He kept moving up and down. He said give us a (shove ?). His diddle was inside my person. He was moving up & down two minutes. He made me cry. I felt pain. He got off me & got on Jim Beale. I buttoned my trowsers as quick as I could to run away. I was buttoning up, then Jim Beale began to cry. JB was lying on his back. JB sung out Daddy! Daddy! J Beale tripped over and fell over a root. Jim 13 Brown was there. He Prisoner said don't you tell anyone & gave us a penny each. He gave me 3d. & told me to give 1d. each

4

Jim B I went home, [told] my mother something. She put oil on my behind here.

    Cross-examined. No court told me what to say. I didn't tell my mother the man who was with us was dressed like you are.

    Re-examined. I told no one till Brown's mother came round to my mother. Then I told what had happened.

    James Frederick Beale. Scott Street, Liverpool. Know prisoner. 1st saw him one Sunday. 14 I saw him when I was with Albert & Billy Brown back of Donald's. He came up & asked us to go to will you come up in the bush. He said he'd give us half a crown. I said no, Albert said yes. We went up into the bush.

5

Prisoner came to where we were. He took Albert's trowsers down & got on top of him. Albert was lying on his back, then on his stomach. Prisoner lay on top of him. He undid himself down here. Prisoner got his thing & put it into his bum. Albert was crying — Prisoner said Sh — like that. Albert was trying to get away. Prisoner got up. Then prisoner undid my trowsers down here. He laid me on my back. He put his thing in my mouth, then he turned me on my stomach. I cried. He tried to undo my the back of my trowsers. I would not let him.

6

I said I'm going home. When he laid on my stomach he hurt me on the stomach. I cried. Then I got up. I walked away. He gave us 3d. between us — I didn't hear him say anything then. I saw his thing. We tried to run away. He run with at the back of us. I went home. Albert went to his home — Father came home. I didn't say anything then. On Sunday morning I told him something.

    To a Juror. He seemed drunk.

    Cross-examined. Nobody told me to say you were the man.

    Sarah Miller. Mother of Albert Miller, married, residing in Moore Street, Liverpool. On Saturday November 3rd I heard something about 62 pm.

7

Albert came home about 6½. I then spoke to him before he went to bed. After I examined him I found his bottom was inflamed & swollen. I bathed & applied oil. He (?) (at ?) (toilet ?) next morning B after I examined him. Before I examined I heard something to me. Albert is 9 years old.

    Cross-examined. I did not call the Doctor in.

    James Johnson. Senior Constable Liverpool. I've known prisoner 15 or 16 months since I've been at Liverpool. I remember prisoner about 5 pm going in the direction offence alleged to have been committed. It was 3 or 400 yards he was going in.

8

Case for the Crown.
    Prisoner [George Wilson] addresses. Says boys asked it. (He ?) (the ?) (man ?) in court boys say I was drunk, police I was sober.
    I sum up.

Jury retires 11.20, returns 11.45. Guilty —
Gaoler (Bathurst ?) 10 5 years 3 years — (Book ?) 2 year 5 years 8 years. Lesser sentence proposed.

29

Thursday 15 November [1888].
Darlinghurst Criminal Court.
George Wilson, Sodomy — for sentence — convicted yesterday.

    Dr O'Connor states he has examined him & state of arteries from heart would make flogging dangerous to him.
Penal servitude 15 years.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

<>The Daily Telegraph, Thu 15 Nov 1888 15

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14.
(Before Mr [WJ] Justice Foster.)

    Mr Cohen appeared on behalf of the Crown.

UNNATURAL OFFENCE.

    A middle-aged man named George Wilson pleaded not guilty to an indictment charging him with having, on November 3, at Liverpool, committed an unnatural crime. The jury after hearing the evidence, which disclosed circumstances of a most revolting nature, found the prisoner guilty. The prisoner, in response to the usual question whether he ad anything to say before being sentenced, pleaded that he might not be flogged, as he suffered from heart disease. His Honor remanded the accused for sentence, pending medical advice.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 15 Nov 1888 16

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.—
WEDNESDAY.
(Before his Honor Mr Justice Foster.)

    Mr HE Cohen appeared on behalf of the Crown.

JURORS FINED.

    The following jurors were fined ,5 each for non-attendance:B William Edward Ward, builder, Canterbury-road, Marrickville; Joseph Slade, Belmore-road, Randwick; James Swain, seedsman, 736 George-street, Sydney; William Oscar Jones, accountant, 186 Bourke-street, Sydney; William Clark, stock and station agent, Victoria-street, Ashfield.

CRIMINAL ASSAULT.

    George Wilson, an elderly man, was arraigned upon an indictment charging him with having criminally assaulted a boy named Albert Miller, at Lambton, on November 3, 1888.

    The evidence against the prisoner showed that the offence was committed in the bush at Liverpool, on the date mentioned in the indictment. The prisoner was found guilty. The gaol records showed that he was an old offender, and had served several long terms of imprisonment. He was remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Fri 16 Nov 1888 17

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15.
(Before Mr Justice Foster.)

    Mr HE Cohen conducted the prosecutions on behalf of the Crown.

UNNATURAL OFFENCE.

    George Wilson, who was on Wednesday been found guilty of the commission of an unnatural crime, was brought up for sentence. His Honor said that he had taken medical advice on the subject, and had ascertained that the prisoner was not physically in a fit state to bear a flogging. Such men as the prisoner were not fit to be at large, and when they were caught in the commission of their horrible offences it was right that they should be severely punished. The sentence of the Court was that the prisoner be kept to penal servitude for a period of 15 years.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 16 Nov 1888 18

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.—
THURSDAY.
(Before his Honor Mr Justice Foster.)

    Mr Cohen appeared on behalf of the Crown.

SENTENCE.

    George Wilson, who had been found guilty of criminally assaulting a boy at Liverpool, was placed in the dock to receive sentence.

    His Honor addressing the prisoner pointed out to him that he had been found guilty of an abominable offence on the clearest evidence. The sentence of the Court was that the prisoner should be kept to penal servitude for the period of 15 years. His Honor added that he passed this sentence partly in the interest and for the protection of society, and he thought it would also keep the prisoner out of the way and prevent him from doing any further harm for the remainder of his life.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

George Wilson, Gaol photo sheet 19 

SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6050], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 28 Sep 1888-13 Jul 1889, No. 4310, p. 59, R5103.

Gaol Photo Sheet - Transcribed Details

Number on Gaol Register: 4310

Portrait Taken:- 10-11-1888

Name: George Wilson
(aka George White, George Moffatt)


Native place: BC Sydney

Year of birth: 1849

Arrived        Ship:
in Colony }   Year: 

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Bootmaker

Religion: C of E

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 5½"

Weight     On committal: 145
in lbs     }  On discharge: 

Colour of hair: Brown to Grey

Colour of eyes: Brown

Marks or Special Features: Girls dancing on globes with flags on outside both right and left upper arms


Where and when tried: Sydney Gaol Delivery
Offence: Buggery
Sentence: 15 years penal servitude

 

Remarks: His Honor remarked it was my intention of giving three floggings of fifty lashes each in addition to your sentence but in consequence of Dr O'Connors report I will not order you to be flogged.

 (No. of previous Portrait ... 461 Goulburn ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Bathurst [Q.S]

ditto

Bourke Q.S

Sydney Q.S
Orange Q.S

Water PO

Liverpool PO

Liverpool PO

 10

 11

   8

   8
  13

  1

10

  3

  2

  5

11

  4
  5

  4

  7

  9

1868

1874

1877

1880
1880

1887

1888

1888

Forgery and Uttering

Receiving stolen property

Larceny

Stealing in a dwelling
Forgery and uttering

Suspected person

Unlawfully on premises

Stealing a till

5 years Roads

* 5 years Roads

2 years hard labour

5 years hard labour
8 years Roads         } Concurrent

6 months hard labour

7 days C

1 month hard labour

* According to the newspaper report of the trial the sentence awarded was 3 years on the roads.

 


1  The Bathurst Times, Wed 12 Feb 1868, p. 2.

2  SRNSW: NRS2232, [3/5969A], Goulburn Gaol photographic description book, Dec 1884-May 1890, No. 461, p. 27, R5119.

3  Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 9 May 1874, p. 725.

4  SRNSW: NRS1998, [3/5955], Bathurst Gaol photographic description book, 1874-1930, No. 124, p. 119, R5084.

5  The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 3 Apr 1880, p. 8. Emphasis added.

6  The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 8 Apr 1880, p. 6. Emphasis added.

7  The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 9 Apr 1880, p. 6.

8  The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 12 Apr 1880, p. 3.

9  Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 22 May 1880, p. 999.

10 Depositions (9/6756-9/6761) for this case could not be located at SRNSW.

11 SRNSW: NRS5973, [2/4251], Judiciary, WJ Foster, J. Notebooks Criminal Causes, 1888-93, pp. 1-8, 29. Emphasis added.

12 William John Foster, lawyer and politician, was born on 13 Jan 1831 at Rathescar, County Louth, Ireland. The Fosters were a distinguished Anglo-Irish legal family. William John was educated at Cheltenham College, England and Trinity College, Dublin. He left for the Victorian goldfields without having taken his degree in 1852. After studying law in Sydney he was admitted to the Bar on 13 May 1858. In 1859-62 and 1864-70 he was crown prosecutor for the northern district, and in 1870 for Sydney. Being a devout Evangelical involved him in many Church of England related organisations. Was attorney general in JS Farnell's ministry during 1877-78. Foster became a QC in 1886 and acted as Supreme Court judge on circuit. On 14 Feb 1888 Foster was appointed to the NSW Supreme Court bench. In 1891 ill health forced Foster to seek leave; after a visit to Europe in 1892 he retired in 1894 and moved from his home, Thurnby, at Newtown. He died at Valley Heights on 16 Aug 1909 from senile decay and was buried in Waverley cemetery. ADB, 1851-1890, vol. 4, pp. 206-7.

13 Means Willy or Billy.

14 Means Saturday.

15 The Daily Telegraph, Thu 15 Nov 1888, p. 3. Emphasis added.

16 The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 15 Nov 1888, p. 4.

17 The Daily Telegraph, Fri 16 Nov 1888, p. 3.

18 The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 16 Nov 1888, p. 4.

19 SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6050], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 28 Sep 1888-13 Jul 1889, No. 4310, p. 59, R5103.