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1876, Charles O'Connell - Unfit For Publication
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Edward Bolton, William Smith, and Charles Woods, 1879

Below also see: Charles O’Connell and George Michael Woods, 1882

Charles O’Connell, 1882 – Indecent exposure

 

Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser, Tue 15 Jul 1879 1

GRAFTON POLICE COURT.
SATURDAY, JULY 12.

BEFORE Mr W Thomas, JP.

MONDAY, JULY 14.

    Before the Police Magistrate and Mr A Johnson, JP.

    Edward Bolton, charged with breaking and steeling, Charles Wood [sic], Edward Bolton, and William Smith, all charged with assaulting and robbing Philip Henry Wagner, in Victoria-street, were remanded until Wednesday next for further evidence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser, Sat 19 Jul 1879 2

GRAFTON POLICE COURT.
TUESDAY, JULY 15.

BEFORE the Police Magistrate.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 16.

    Before the Police Magistrate.

    Charles Wood, Edward Bolton, and Williams, on remand, charged with robbing and assaulting Philip Henry Wagner, were brought up.

    After hearing the evidence of Denis Roche, the prisoners were committed to take their trials at the Court of Quarter Sessions.

    Mr Norrie appeared for the prisoner Wood.

GRAFTON QUARTER SESSIONS.
FRIDAY, JULY 18.

BEFORE His Honor Judge Murray.

    Mr AP Backhouse acted as Crown Prosecutor. Other members of the bar present were Messrs E Bennett, J Dillon, and J Tarleton. The following solicitors were also in court during the day:—Messrs F Norrie, EJ Laman, G Foott, J Meillon, and C Dickey.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser, Tue 22 Jul 1879 3

GRAFTON QUARTER SESSIONS.
FRIDAY, JULY 18.

BEFORE His Honor Judge Murray.

————
SATURDAY, JULY 19.

    The Court opened at 9 am this morning.

STEALING FROM THE PERSON.

    Edward Bolton, William Smith, and Charles Woods (a man of colour) were placed in the dock, charged with feloniously stealing from Philip Henry Wagner, at Grafton, on July 13, one watch, one chain, a purse containing a sum of money, and a piece of tobacco.

    The following formed the jury:—George Champion, J Pateman, James Cowan, Alexander Finlayson, H Asberry, sen, N Barnier, H Tree, Charles Page, H Buchanan, Alexander Watt, J Landrigan, and J Humphries (foreman).

    The prisoner Woods challenged a number of jurymen resident in town.

    Prisoners pleaded not guilty, and were defended by Mr Norrie.

    The Crown Prosecutor, in opening the case, informed the jury that the prisoners might have been charged with a much more serious offence viz, that of robbery. They were, however, only charged with feloniously stealing.

    Duke Dean deposed he was a constable of police, and arrested the prisoner Woods on Sunday, June 13, about 10 am; charged him with robbing and assaulting PH Wagner; took him to the lock-up; found on him a silver watch and chain, a £1 note, 15s 9d in silver, a lot of monte cards, and a piece of tobacco.

    Cross-examined by Mr Norrie: Wagner did not claim the watch and chain.

    Sergeant McCormack deposed he arrested the prisoners Smith and Bolton—the former on the river bank, about 4 pm on Sunday, the 13th; took him and locked him up, and charged him with robbing PH Wagner on Saturday night; the prisoner remarked, “Assault and battery, eh?” when searched 11s 3d was found upon him; the prisoner Bolton had been locked up on another charge, and was then also charged with the same offence while in gaol; £1 was found on him, and 9s 9d in silver.

    By Mr Norrie: There were a great many people in town at that time; it was race week.

    Philip Henry Wagner deposed he was a licensed hawker; on last Saturday night was in Roche’s hotel and James’s hotel up to about 12; saw the prisoner Woods at James’s about 5 minutes to 12; had been drinking, but knew what he was doing; left James’s at 12, as Mrs James said she wanted to close; Woods went out with him; went across Victoria-street by himself, and had got about half way across the street towards his lodging; saw some men come suddenly in front of him, and they caught him holding his arms and the prisoner Bolton pressed his chest against his, and at the same time some one put his hand over his mouth; he tried to call out, and one of them said, “You —– fool, hold your tongue”; he then felt his watch taken, and his purse, and other contents of his pockets; when they let him go he had a good view of them, and could swear positively to the whole three prisoners’ identity; he at once called for the police.

    Cross-examined by Mr Norrie: Was never on the spree, but had been drinking all the day; might have had 7 or 8 drinks; was quite sober, and may have had 3 drinks there; had his purse at 9 o’clock; he then counted his money, when he had £1 15s 9d; he might have spent 2s 6d afterwards; it was a starlight night; in quite sure it was Bolton who caught him; saw the prisoners in gaol separately; Bolton was the first man shown to him, and he identified him at once; he was by himself.

    By the Crown Prosecutor: There were 3 lamps burning near the spot, and they threw their light into the middle of the street.

    By His Honor: Did not see any of the prisoners after the offence was committed until they were arrested; did not describe the prisoners to the police; there were four men concerned in the robbery.

    Sergeant McCormack, re-called: When the prosecutor came to the gaol to identify the prisoners, Smith and Woods were in one cell together, and Bolton was in a cell with another man; the prisoners were not pointed out to him; there were about 12 prisoners altogether, and the prisoner [sic] out the 3 prisoners.

    By His Honor: His attention was not called particularly to the two prisoners in the cell.

    Denis Roche deposed: Is a clerk in Mr Foott’s office; resides with his father, who is an innkeeper; saw PH Wagner on Saturday evening; he was in and out, and was about “half-tight;” he had 3 or 4 glasses; he went away at 10; the prisoners Woods, Bolton and Smith were there also; they went away about 5 minutes before Wagner; Bolton was to sleep at his father’s when they went away they said they were going to get a feed of oysters; told them not to stay long, as they would soon shut up; stood at the door; saw Wagner come out James’, and Woods following him; when they got to the middle of the road there was a scuffle, and 3 or 4 joined in it; identify Smith as one of them; it was about 25 yards from the oyster saloon, and 15 to 20 from where he stood; there were lights burning at the time, which lighted up the spot; could not see what took place; Wagner called out “Police;” the scuffle lasted about 2 minutes; the other four parties then walked away all together; they went very fast, and past the oyster saloon; saw the prisoners about half-an-hour after in a room at the back of their house; they were talking, but did not know what they were talking about; they could get into that room without coming through the front.

    By Mr Norrie: Did not see the prisoners before Saturday, and had no previous knowledge of them.

    The Crown Prosecutor said that was the case.

    Mr Norrie, in addressing the jury, said the Crown Prosecutor had very fairly stated in opening the case that the question was one of identity, and unless they were fully satisfied of that they would acquit the prisoners. There was no denying the fact that Wagner was drunk. As to his description of the occurrence, they would agree with him it was very improbable. He did not wish to reflect upon either the Sargeant or any of the police, but they knew how easily it was to give the cue to Wagner as to who were the persons that had been apprehended. The case was one altogether surrounded with doubt, and they ought to give the prisoners the benefit of these, and acquit them.

    The Crown Prosecutor replied, and said that the attorney for the defence had attempted to throw doubts upon the facts of Wagner identifying the prisoners in the gaol. Nothing had been adduced to contravert [sic] that evidence. The Sergeant’s evidence was perfectly clear, and they might as well be asked to disbelieve it altogether as to throw a doubt upon the matter. The boy’s (Roche’s) evidence was quite sufficient to warrant them bringing in a verdict of guilty.

    His Honor, in summing up, carefully analysed the evidence and its bearing upon the several prisoners, and at considerable length dwelt upon the value of the identification of the prisoners by the prosecutor. The boy’s evidence was very clear as to the prisoner Woods being seen by him to leave James’ bar and follow the prosecutor across the street. The scuffle took place immediately, but his identification of the prisoners was only confined to Woods and Smith. If they were satisfied that the case was proved against any one of the prisoners, they would find him guilty; while, if they had any reasonable doubt of the identity of one or all, they would give them the benefit of the doubt, and acquit them.

    The jury retired, and after a long consultation returned to Court with a verdict of guilty against the prisoners Woods and Smith, and not guilty against Bolton.

    Woods and Smith were remanded for sentence, and Bolton was then discharged.

SENTENCES.


    Woods and Smith were remanded until Monday.

————
MONDAY, JULY 21.

SENTENCES.

    His Honor sat this morning at 9 am.

    Charles Woods and William Smith were then asked if they had anything to say. The former said he was innocent. He admitted having been in Wagner’s company, and taking some drinks with him. Smith said he hoped his Honor would deal leniently with him.

    His Honor passed sentences of one years’ hard labour in Grafton gaol.

    The prisoner Smith applied that he might be sent to a gaol where he would be taught a trade. His Honor then made Darlinghurst his place of imprisonment.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

George Bedford (aka Charles Wood), Gaol photo sheet 4

SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6041], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1876-1877, No. 1524, pp. 78a, 78b, R5099. p.1. SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6041], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1876-1877, No. 1524, pp. 78a, 78b, R5099. p.2.

Gaol Photo Sheet - Transcribed Details

No. 1524
Number on Gaol Register: 4785

Portrait taken: 28th July 1876

Prisoner's Name: George Bedford
(aka Charles Wood)

Native place: West Indies

Year of birth: 1848

Arrived        Ship: Damascus 
in Colony }   Year: 1868

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Tin smith

Religion: C.E.

Education, degree of: R & W

Colour of hair: Black

Colour of eyes: Black

Height: 5' 2¼"

Weight     On committal: 146
in lbs     }  On discharge:  "

Special Marks: American Flag on left arm. Scar on right elbow. Anchor on left forearm. Scar on right shoulder.

General Description:

 

 (Previous Number ... ) 

PRISON HISTORY

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Tamworth Q.S.

Grafton Q.S.

Sydney Q.S.

10
26

19

30

Feb
May

July

May

1876
1877

1879

1882

Stealing from the person
Sentence remitted convictions

Stealing from the person

Stealing from the person

18 months HL.
 

12 months HL

12 months L

 


 

Charles O’Connell and George Michael Woods, 1882 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 21 Apr 1882 5

POLICE.
———◦———
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.

    Mr O’Malley Clarke, SM, disposed of the business in the Charge Court yesterday, and Mr Crane, SM, that in the Summons Court.

    Caroline Appleton, charged with having a silver watch and gold chain in her possession, reasonable supposed to be stolen, being unable to explain satisfactorily how she became possessed of them, was sent to gaol for three months.

    Michael Lahiff, 27, was convicted of inciting a prisoner to resist Constable Parkinson in the execution of his duty. Parkinson, it appeared from the evidence, had the defendant’s mother in custody on a charge of stealing, when the defendant said he would not allow him to take her, called upon others to assist him in preventing the constable from taking her, and threw blue metal stones at him. The consequence of his interference was that the woman had to be let go. Fined £3; in default, a month in gaol.

    John Aldus, 43, was charged by warrant with violently and maliciously threatening his wife Emily. The defendant, it appeared, had previously been bound over to keep the peace towards his wife, and was bailed out only about a week ago. The complainant said that since he had come out of prison he had been very violent, more so than before, and she was unable to put up with his conduct any longer. When sober he was a good husband and father, but when in drink he lost control over himself. He was bound over to keep the peace for six months—himself in £20 and two sureties in £10 each; in default, one month in gaol.

    Charles O’Connell was charged with stealing the sum of £12 10s, and a bunch of keys, the property of Sarah Walsh.  George Michael Woods was charged with being concerned with O’Connell in the robbery. Mr Carroll appeared for Woods. The case for the prosecution was that on the morning of the 18th instant, at about twenty-five minutes to 9, the defendant Woods went into the Crown Hotel, corner of Goulburn and Elizabeth streets, of which Mrs Walsh is the landlady. The defendant O’Connell followed him into the bar about five minutes afterwards. They were both supplied with drink by the barmaid, Eleanor Walsh, who then had occasion to leave the room to get her breakfast. She had scarcely sat down at the table when she heard the alarm attached to the till ring. She and Mrs Walsh immediately rushed into the bar, and saw the defendant O’Connell coming from behind the bar in a hurried manner. Woods by this time had left. An examination showed that the money had been taken from a drawer just above the till, and the defendant, O’Connell, was accused of the theft. He denied the charge, but a policeman having been sent for, he was given into custody. The only evidence against Woods was the fact of his having been in the bar before the robbery, and his having stated when arrested that he had not been in the Crown Hotel on the morning in question. Both prisoners were committed to take their trial at the next Court of Quarter Sessions.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 30 May 1882 6

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
MONDAY.
(Before his Honor Mr District Court Judge Josephson.)

    The May sittings of the Metropolitan Quarter Sessions were commenced this morning at the courthouse, Darlinghurst. Mr PJ Healy prosecuted for the Crown.

    The following is a list of cases set down for hearing tomorrow (Tuesday):—Agnes Robinson, larceny; Margaret Parker, larceny; William Jackson, stealing from the person; William Jackson, stealing from the person; Thomas Evans, larceny; George Woods, stealing from the person; Morandi Antonio, larceny; Elizabeth Clark, stealing from the person; James Bourke, attempt to commit suicide; Adolphus Monroe, stealing from the person; John Williams, stealing in a dwelling.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 31 May 1882 7

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
TUESDAY.
(Before Mr District Court Judge Josephson.)

    The court reopened at 10 o’clock this morning. Mr PJ Healy prosecuted for the Crown. 

STEALING FROM THE PERSON.

    George Woods, a coloured man, was charged with that he did at Sydney, on the 8th April last, steal, take, and carry away from the person of one Joseph Smith,  one purse, two French dollars, and £3 17s, the money and property of the said Joseph Smith. Prisoner pleaded not guilty. The evidence for the Crown was, briefly, that on the afternoon and evening of the day stated, prosecutor, prisoner, and other men were drinking together. At about 9 o’clock, whilst they were standing in Sussex-street,  prisoner snatched the purse, containing the money, out of prosecutor’s hand and ran away with it. The jury, without leaving the box found prisoner guilty, and he was remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Fri 2 Jun 1882 8

QUARTER SESSIONS.
———◦———
THURSDAY, JUNE 1.
(Before Mr District Court Judge Josephson.)

    The Court re-opened this morning at 9 o’clock, when Mr PJ Healy prosecuted for the Crown.

    SENTENCES.—

    Geo Woods, a coloured man, convicted of stealing from the person, was sentenced to 12 months’ hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 2 Jun 1882 9

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
THURSDAY.
(Before his Honor Mr District Court Judge Josephson.)

    The Court reopened at half-past 9 o’clock this morning. Mr PJ Healy, assisted by Mr FL Smythe, prosecuted for the Crown. 

SENTENCES.


    George Woods, stealing from the person, 12 months’ hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 8 Jun 1882 10

METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COURT.
WEDNESDAY.
(Before Mr District Court Judge Dowling.)


    The following is the list of cases for trial to-day:—William Maclean, false pretences; Charles O’Connell and another, larceny; Robert Nathan Blanchard, larceny; Patrick Cunningham, assault and robbery; James Brown, false pretences; William O’Brien, indecent assault.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Fri 9 Jun 1882 11

QUARTER SESSIONS.
THURSDAY, JUNE 8.
(Before Mr District Court Judge Josephson.)

    Mr PJ Healy, appeared to prosecute for the Crown.

    STEALING FROM A DWELLING.—Charles O’Connell, and [George] Michael Woods, pleaded not guilty to that they did, on the 18th April, at Sydney, steal from the dwelling of Mrs Sarah Walsh, at the corner of Elizabeth and Goulburn-streets, 10 keys, one flask containing brandy; and money to the value of £12 18s. Mr Levien appeared for Woods, Mrs Walsh had left the hotel bar with the two prisoners in it for a few minutes when she heard the alarm bell of the money drawer ring, and noticed prisoner behind the bar, and the money and other articles gone. The jury having retired, brought in a verdict of not guilty, and as there were no other charges against prisoners they were discharged.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 9 Jun 1882 12

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
THURSDAY.
(Before his Honor Mr District Court Judge Josephson.)

  The court opened this morning at 10 o’clock.
  Mr PJ Healy prosecuted for the Crown.

STEALING FROM A DWELLING.

    Charles O’Connell and Michael Woods were charged with that they did, at Sydney, on the 18th April last, steal, take, and carry away, a bunch of keys, a flask of brandy, and money to the amount of £12 12s, from the dwelling-house of Sarah Walsh. Prisoners pleaded not guilty. O’Connell was undefended. Mr H Levien appeared for Woods. Prosecutrix was licensee of the Crown Hotel, corner of Goulburn and Elizabeth streets. On the day mentioned, between 8 and 9 o’clock in the morning, O’Connell went into the bar of the hotel and called for a drink, which was supplied to him; and Woods entered shortly afterwards, and also asked for and was given a drink. The barmaid, Eleanor Walsh, who was the only one in there, then left the bar to get her breakfast, there being in the till at the time the money stated in the information. The till is fitted with an alarm, and she had just sat down to her breakfast when the alarm sounded. She and Mrs Walsh rushed into the bar and found O’Connell coming from behind the counter, but Woods had disappeared. The money was at once found to be missing, and O’Connell was given into custody, Woods being arrested later in the day. The money was not found on either of the prisoners. The jury retired, and after a short deliberation, found prisoners not guilty, and they were discharged.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

George Woods (aka George Bedford, George Henry), Gaol photo sheet 13 

SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6044], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1881-1883, No. 2621, p. 149, R5100.

Gaol Photo Sheet - Transcribed Details

No. 2621
Number on Gaol Register: 3505-82

Portrait taken: 13th May 1882

Prisoner's Name: George Woods
(aka George bedford, George Henry)

Native place: West Indies

Year of birth: 1841

Arrived        Ship: Not known 
in Colony }   Year: 

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Barber

Religion: C of England

Education, degree of: R & W

Colour of hair: Black

Colour of eyes: Brown

Height: 5' 3"

Weight     On committal: 143
in lbs     }  On discharge: 

Special Marks: Bald

General Description:

Where and when tried: Sydney Q.S.
30 May 1882

Offence: Stealing from the person

Sentence: 12 months H.L.

Remarks:

 (Previous Portrait ... 1524 ) 

PRISON HISTORY

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Tamworth Q.S.

Grafton Q.S.

10

19

Feb

July

1876

1879

Stealing from the person

Stealing from the person

18 months HL.

12 months HL

  


 

Charles O’Connell, 1882

Evening News, Fri 1 Sep 1882 14

BREVITIES.


    A man named Chas O’Connell, described as a french-polisher, was charged before Mr Dillon to-day with wilfully and obscenely exposing himself in the public park, in the presence of a number of little children. Mr Dillon commented on the disgusting nature of the offence and the frequency of its occurrence, and gave the prisoner the highest sentence he could, viz, six months’ imprisonment. This was well deserved, and we trust that in all such cases the Bench will be similarly severe.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 2 Sep 1882 15

POLICE.
———◦———
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.

    Mr Dillon, SM, disposed of the business on the Criminal side, and Mr Clarke, SM, adjudicated on the Summons side of the Court, yesterday.

     Charles O’Connell was charged with having wilfully obscenely exposed himself in Hyde Park, a public place within the city of Sydney. Two girls aged 11 and 13, gave evidence in support of the charge, and the prisoner was convicted of the offence. Mr Dillon, in passing sentence, said that he would fail in his duty if he were not to impose the heaviest sentence in his power for such abominable conduct as that of which prisoner had been proved to be guilty, and ordered him to be imprisoned with hard labour for a period of six months.

 


1     Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser,  Sat 19 Jul 1879, p. 2.

2     Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser,  Sat 19 Jul 1879, p. 2. Emphasis added.

3     Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser,  Tue 22 Jul 1879, p. 2. Emphasis added.

4     SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6041] , Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1876-1877, No. 1524, pp. 78a, 78b, R5099.

5     The Sydney Morning Herald,  Fri 21 Apr 1882, p. 7. Emphasis added.

6     The Sydney Morning Herald,  Tue 30 May 1882, p. 7. Emphasis added.

7     The Sydney Morning Herald,  Wed 31 May 1882, p. 7.

8     The Daily Telegraph,  Fri 2 Jun 1882, p. 3.

9     The Sydney Morning Herald,  Fri 2 Jun 1882, p. 9.

10   The Sydney Morning Herald,  Thu 8 Jun 1882, p. 8. Emphasis added.

11   The Daily Telegraph,  Fri 9 Jun 1882, p. 4.

12   The Sydney Morning Herald,  Fri 9 Jun 1882, p. 3.

13   SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6044] , Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1881-1883, No. 2621, p. 149, R5100.

14   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW),  Fri 1 Sep 1882, p. 3.

15   The Sydney Morning Herald,  Sat 2 Sep 1882, p. 7.