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1880, William Cardwell - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: William Cardwell, 1882,
William Cardwell, 1886

 

The Tamworth Observer and Northern Advertiser, Sat 28 Aug 1880 1

POLICE COURT.
———◦———
Before the Police Magistrate.
————
AUGUST 24, 1880.
————

EXPOSING HIS PESON.

    William Cardwell, was charged with exposing his person, on the bridge over the Peel river. 

    He pleaded not guilty.

    The evidence, which showed the case to be a very gross one was given by Sergeant Flaherty, Margaret Smith, Mary Agnes Dunn and Henry Daly was taken, after which prisoner was sentenced to six months with hard labour in Tamworth gaol.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

William Cardwell, Gaol photo sheet 2

SRNSW: NRS2327, [3/5984], Maitland Gaol photographic description book, 1875-1930, No. 330, p. 22, R5129.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 330

Date when Portrait was taken: 2nd November 1880

Prisoner's Name: William Cardwell

Native place: England

Year of birth: 1845

Arrived        Ship: Young Mechanic
in Colony }   Year: 1858

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Cook

Religion: Church of England

Education, degree of: R & W

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Blue

Height: 5' 3½"

Weight     On committal: 
in lbs     }  On discharge: 

Marks or Special Features:

Where and when tried: Tamworth PC
24th August 1880

Offence: Exposing his person

Sentence: 6 months HL

Remarks:-

 (No. of Previous Portrait ...  ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

 

 

 

 

 

 

   



William Cardwell, 1882 
 

The Tamworth Observer and Northern Advertiser, Sat 18 Nov 1882 3

HOSPITAL REPORT.

The following is the report of th Tamworth Hospital for the week ending Nov 17, 1882. Remaining in Hospital Nov 10, males, 6; females, 0; total 6. Admitted during the week, males 2, females 1; total 3. Discharged during the week, males 0, females, 0, total 0. Remaining, in Hospital Nov 17, males, 8, females, 1, total 9. One patient died during the week.

———
‘GAZETTE’ ITEMS.

The following tenders have been accepted:—Erection of Police Buildings, Narrabri, W Summerhayes; erection of Post and Telegraph Office, Tamworth, J Conlon.

———
POLICE ITEMS.

Before the Police Magistrate, on the 10th inst, William Cardwell, for exposing his person, was sent up for six months.—Ellen Gaffney, for making use of obscene language, was fined 20s or 14 days’ imprisonment— William Garden was fined 5s for being drunk, and 40s for using obscene language.—Nov 13. On the application of Susan Bridges an order was made prohibiting all publican’s [sic] to supply liquor to George Bridges.—Nov 14. William Elbra was apprehended under circumstances of wandering about and deemed to be insane. He was remanded for medical treatment.—Nov 15. Thomas Brom, for being drunk, was fined 5s; and the same prisoner for obscene language, was fined 40s.—Absolom Pedlar, and James Frizzill, for being drunk, were fined 5s.— Nov 15. James Boland, drunk, 20s or 7 days.

————
CALROSSY FRUIT.

Mr Samuel Banks, gardener at Calrossy (the residence of J Patterson, Esq, solicitor), brought to this office, last Thursday morning, a collection of fruit and flowers grown at Calrossy. It included fine samples of strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, mulberries, cherries, almonds and oranges, and a very varied assortment of flowers, some of which were particularly fine specimens. Mr Banks informs us that the Calrossy grounds are to be laid in carpet-gardening, when, probably, we will have an opportunity of further commenting upon this pretty estate.

 


 
William Cardwell, 1886 

Evening News, Mon 25 Jan 1886 4

TELEGRAMS.
———◦———
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS.)
————

TAMWORTH ITEMS.

Tamworth, Saturday.


    William Cardwell, charged with having committed a criminal assault on a girl 9 years of age, has been committed for trial

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Tamworth News and Liverpool Plains and Gwydir Districts’ Advertiser, Tue 6 Apr 1886 5

TAMWORTH CIRCUIT COURT.
———◦———
(Before His Honor Mr Justice Windeyer)
———
MONDAY, APRIL 5th.

THE COURT opened at 10 o’clock yesterday morning. The barristers present were Messrs—Armstrong, Crown Prosecutor, Hon HE Cohen, A Gordon, junr, BR Wise, Walter Edmunds, AJ Ralston, and Colonna Close. Judge’s Associate, Mr HM Cockshott. In addition to the local attornies [sic] Messrs Readett (Sydney), and Dale (Narrabri), were also present. Mr CW Stafford represented the Crown Solicitor.

    William Cardwell, pleaded “not guilty,” to the charge of indecently assaulting Emily Raynor [aka Reyner], a girl under ten years of age. Prisoner was undefended, but from the evidence adduced there could hardly be a doubt as to his guilt. The details are, of course, utterly unfit for publication. The jury after a short retirement, returned a verdict of “guilty,” and prisoner was remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 6 Apr 1886 6

COUNTRY NEWS.
———◦———
By Telegraph.)
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS.)
——

Albury, Monday.

    A fatal accident occurred to-day at Sergeant’s Lagoon, near Albury. Three men, belonging to the Sydney unemployed, who were furnished with free railway passes to Albury, got into a small boat for the purpose of crossing the lagoon. One of the party (a coloured man named John Hudson) began playing pranks, causing the boat to rock about in a dangerous manner. He was cautioned by the others but persisted, and finally caused the boat to capsize, all three men being precipitated into the water. Hudson was drowned almost immediately; and another named George Martin had a very narrow escape, whilst the third man was also nearly drowned after a vain attempt to rescue Hudson. Information was given to the police, and Hudson’s body was recovered. A magisterial inquiry resulted in a verdict of accidental death.

    The bush fire on the Victorian side of the Murray is apparently subsiding.

Tamworth, Monday.

    At the Circuit Court to-day, before Mr Justice Windeyer, William Thomas Brown pleaded guilty to a charge of stealing a watch.
    George Rogers pleaded guilty to two charges of forgery and uttering.
    William Cardwell was found guilty of assaulting Emily Raynor, a girl under 10 years’ of age.
    James Moore was found guilty of attempting to do grievous bodily harm.
    Alexander Brown was found guilty of stealing a cow.
    All the prisoners were remanded for sentence. There are only two more cases for trial.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Tamworth Observer and Northern Advertiser, Wed 7 Apr 1886 7

CIRCUIT COURT.
———◦———
(Before His Honor Mr Justice Windeyer)
———
MONDAY, APRIL 5th.

    The Court opened at 10 o’clock Monday morning. The barristers present were Messrs John Armstrong, Crown Prosecutor, Hon HE Cohen, A Gordon, junr, BR Wise, Walter Edmunds, AJ Ralston, and Colonna Close. Judge’s Associate, Mr HM Cockshott. In addition to the local attornies [sic], Messrs Readett (Sydney), and Dale (Narrabri), were also present. Mr CW Stafford represented the Crown Solicitor.

    William Cardwell, pleaded not guilty to the charge of indecently assaulting Emily Raynor, a girl under ten years of age. Prisoner was undefended. Evidence which is unfit for publication was given by Constable Daniel O’Hanlon, Mary Raynor (the girl’s mother) Emily Raynor, and Dr PM White.

    For the defence – prisoner called William Graham, a boy ten years of age, and William Mundi; also some others, who did not answer.

    The jury, after a short absence, brought in a verdict of guilty against the prisoner, who was remanded for sentence. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 6.
———
SENTENCES.


    William Cardwell, found guilty of indecent assault, was brought up for sentence. Mr McLean, Governor of Tamworth Gaol, and Sergeant Flaherty, gave evidence of a number of charges against the prisoner, who handed in a statement, saying he had a few times been committed of trifling offences, committed when under the influence of drink. His Honor described the offences as of a most abominable and inhuman character, and sentenced him to twelve years’ penal servitude, with two whippings of twenty-five lashes each, the first to be administered this day week; the second on the 6th September next. On leaving the dock, prisoner said “he could not do it.”

JUDICIAL REMARKS. 
———◦———

IN sentencing the prisoners, last Tuesday morning, His Honor Judge Windeyer made some excellent observations on the effects of various punishments upon prisoner’s [sic] convicted. Though we have not room for all His Honor said, we think a condense version of some of his remarks will be read with considerable interest. In the case for instance of—

BROWN.

    His Honor said Brown was committed on as clear evidence as ever came before a court. It had been attempt to be shown that prisoner acted under very great temptation, but he could not see that there was any great temptation at all in the matter. On the contrary, it was quite clear he had seen the cow running about in a place where she seemed to be unknown and he appropriated her as he thought with impunity. He could not see that a short sentence would meet the case. Cattle-stealing was a crime which undermined one of the greatest industries of the colony, and it must be put down with a firm hand. The law empowered him to pass a sentence of ten years’ penal servitude, but he was not going to do so. He was going to take into consideration the jury’s recommendation to mercy, and also the good character given him by the witnesses. It appeared this was the first offence against prisoner, and he (His Honor) hoped it would be his last. His experiences had taught him that it was quite a mistake to pass trifling sentences in such cases as this, for they did not have any deterrent effect; while, on the contrary, it was well know [sic] that a comparatively severe sentence at first had effectively reformed prisoners and made them respectable members of society ever after. The sentence to be passed was one which he hoped would have a salutary effect. Prisoner was sentence [sic] to three years’ imprisonment with hard labour. Mr Ralston remarked that the sentence would invole [sic] the prisoner being to Berrima. His Honor responded, that that was exactly his intention, for he know [sic] Berrima gaol was the only one in which prisoners could be placed under the effect of solitary confinement. In Berrima prisoner would be able to reflect and reform.

MOORE.

    His Honor said he was not going to pass a severe sentence. He then addressed the prisoner on the enormity of his position, which was brought about evidently by the accursed drink. Prisoner might have been sentenced to penal servitude for his life, and it was a good thing for him that the men who gave evidence yesterday, were possessed of so much courage and presence of mind as they had displayed. Though drunkenness was no excuse for crime, the offence prisoner had committed could not be overlooked. He hoped that when he came out of gaol he would keep away from drink; and if he could not do so by any other means, that he would take the pledge, or go through some for which would have the effect of preventing him from drinking in future. Sentence was then passed.

CARDWELL.

    You have been properly convicted of a most terrible offence; you have morally and physically ruined for life a helpless little girl. The crime was one for the committal of which any good father would naturally feel constrain [sic] to take the life of the assailant of his child; and he thought no jury could be found to convict such a father. It was a most abominable and beastly offence—prisoner was an inhuman brute of a kind which must be suppressed. It was shocking even to think that little children could not walk about the streets without being liable to be subjected to the assaults of such a vile specimen of humanity as the prisoner evidently was. It was undeniable that prisoner was guilty of one of the worst offences society could suffer from a low, disgusting, beast-like sort of crime which must be suppressed at all hazards. The law allowed, in addition to penal servitude, three whippings of 50 lashes each. But, however, as prisoner did not appear to be a strong man, he would not pass the extreme sentence, still he must make an example of brutes as this prisoner. Sentence was then passed; and when prisoner heard it, he took a firm grip of the dock rail; and when lead away, like a well-whipped cur, with its tail hard down, he succeeded in murmuring something to the effect that he would not be able to get through the sentence. In which case the State will be spared some expense.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Tamworth News and Liverpool Plains and Gwydir Districts’ Advertiser, Fri 9 Apr 1886 8

TAMWORTH CIRCUIT COURT.
———◦———
(Before His Honor Mr Justice Windeyer)
———
TUESDAY, APRIL 6th.
———
SENTENCES.

    At the opening of the court, the three prisoner s who pleaded guilty on the previous day, and the three who had been convicted by justice, were placed in the dock to receive their sentences. 

    William Cardwell for indecently assaulting a child under ten years of age, had a bad character given to him by Gaoler Maclean and Sergeant Flaherty, he having been previously convicted for offences of a similar tendency. The judge addressed him in very severe terms and said the case as disclosed was almost as bad as anything that had ever come before him, and he did not intend to pass it over. The sentence of the Court was twelve years penal servitude, with two whippings of twenty five lashes each, the first on that day week, and the second on the 6th September next. On being removed from the dock, prisoner muttered, “I’ll never do it.” 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Wed 14 Apr 1886 9

GENERAL NEWS.
———


    THE LASH IN TAMWORTH.—On Tuesday William Cardwell, the prisoner who assaulted a little girl, received his first whipping in the Tamworth Gaol. The Government medical officer, Dr White, was in attendance. Cardwell trembled and showed signs of fear when brought from his cell and tied up; but the flogging was not very severe, and he stood the punishment till the tenth blow. Then he showed signs of having had enough. The eleventh stroke induced him to howl, and he kept up the cry till the twenty-second stroke, when Dr White said that he had had enough. The punishment was mild.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Tamworth Observer and Northern Advertiser, Wed 14 Apr 1886 10

THE WHIPPING OF CARDWELL.

    William Cardwell, a thing made in the shape of a man, and probably the vilest specimen of cur-like humanity that an offended Nature could spawn upon the earth, was brought out of his cell in Tamworth Gaol, at grey dawn, last Tuesday morning. Quivering like a slim poplar leaf in a breeze, he was braced up to the frame work popularly known as “the triangle”—probably so named because the victim’s arms and legs make some sort of an “angle” from which, “try” as he will there is no escape. You may say we are joking with a serious subject! Be that as it may, we are going to talk plain serious English now. The beast Cardwell was sentenced to receive twenty-five lashes, as a portion of his sentence for tampering with a female infant and imparting to her a loathsome disease. He took ten of the strokes without much show of objection; but the eleventh made him howl, and he continued to keep up the miserable cry of a badly stuck pig until the twenty-second stroke had been delivered, when the medical officer (out of pure kind-heartedness, we hope) ordered the punishment to cease, and the prisoner was taken down. We are not advocates of capital punishment, and as a last resort we would adopt flogging; but we do not believe that what thy right hand finds necessary to do, do it with all they might. We believe we echo the opinion of nine-tenths of the married men of this community when we say that the first whipping in Tamworth was a failure; and that the thing named Cardwell should have been made to howl from the jump. Let us fervently hope that when on Sept 6, in Berrima, he gets his second dose, he will understand what “nine pussies and twenty-seven kittens” really mean. Just now he does not.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 17 Apr 1886 11

GENERAL NEWS.
————


    THE LASH IN TAMWORTH.—On Tuesday William Cardwell, the prisoner who assaulted a little girl, received his first whipping in the Tamworth Gaol. The Government medical officer, Dr White, was in attendance. Cardwell trembled and showed signs of fear when brought from his cell and tied up; but the flogging was not very severe, and he stood the punishment till the tenth blow. Then he showed signs of having had enough. The eleventh stroke induced him to howl, and he kept up the cry till the twenty-second stroke, when Dr White said that he had had enough. The punishment was mild.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

William Cardwell, Gaol photo sheet template 12 

SRNSW: NRS2138, [19/9835], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886 No.3584, p. 57, R5102.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 3584
3744-86

Date when Portrait was taken: 20-4-1886

Prisoner's Name: William Cardwell

Native place: England

Year of birth: 1843

Arrived        Ship: Young Mechanic
in Colony }   Year: 1858

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Laborer

Religion: C of England

Education, degree of: R & Write

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Grey

Height: 5' 5½"

Weight     On committal: 132 
in lbs     }  On discharge: 

Marks or Special Features:

Where and when tried: Tamworth CC
5th April 1886

Offence: Assault with intent to carnally know a girl under 10 years

Sentence: 12 years P.S. & 2 floggings of 25 lashes each

Remarks: 

 (No. of Previous Portrait ... 330 Maitland  ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

 Tamworth PC

24

8

1880 

Expose person

6 months HL 

    


1    The Tamworth Observer and Northern Advertiser, Sat 28 Aug 1880, p. 7.

2    SRNSW: NRS2327, [3/5984], Maitland Gaol photographic description book, 1875-1930, No. 330, p. 22, R5129.

3    The Tamworth Observer and Northern Advertiser, Sat 18 Nov 1882, p. 7. Emphasis added.

4    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 25 Jan 1886, p. 6.

5    The Tamworth News and Liverpool Plains and Gwydir Districts’ Advertiser, Tue 6 Apr 1886, p. 2.

6    The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 6 Apr 1886, p. 10. Emphasis added.

7    The Tamworth Observer and Northern Advertiser, Wed 7 Apr 1886, p. 2. Emphasis added.

8    The Tamworth News and Liverpool Plains and Gwydir Districts’ Advertiser, Fri 9 Apr 1886, p. 2.

9    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 14 Apr 1886, p. 6.

10   The Tamworth Observer and Northern Advertiser, Wed 14 Apr 1877, p. 3.

11   Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 17 Apr 1886, p. 792.

12   SRNSW: NRS2138, [19/9835], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886 No.3584, p. 57, R5102.