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1893, Thomas Hallinan - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: Richard Henry Brewin, 1891-1989

 

Evening News, Fri 12 May 1893 1

YESTERDAY’S BREVITIES.
————


    Thomas Hallinan, 27, canvasser, was committed for trial, at the Central Police Court this afternoon, on a charge of indecently assaulting Richard Henry Brewin, [special constable].

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Thu 15 Jun 1893 2

QUARTER SESSIONS.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14.
(Before Judge Murray and juries.)

    Mr WL Merewether prosecuted on behalf of the Crown.

ALLEGED ASSAULT.

    Thomas Halliman [aka Hallinan], who was defended by Mr TM Williamson, pleaded not guilty to having, on May 10, indecently assaulted Richard Henry Brewin. The jury found him not guilty, and he was discharged.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Thu 15 Jun 1893 3

YESTERDAY’S BREVITIES.
————


    A young man named Thomas Hallinan was acquitted at the quarter sessions this afternoon of a charge of having indecently assaulted Richard Henry Brewin near the Railway Station  on May 10 last.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 15 Jun 1893 4

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
WEDNESDAY.
(Before his Honor Judge MURRAY and juries.)

    Mr WL Merewether prosecuted on behalf of the Crown.

ALLEGED ASSAULT.

    Thomas Hallinan, a young man, was charged with an assault on Richard Henry Brewin, on 10th May, but the jury, without leaving the box, found him not guilty, and he was discharged.

 


 

Richard Henry Brewin, 1891-1898 

 

Evening News, Wed 23 Sep 1891 5

A “SPECIAL” ARREST.
————

    At the Redfern Police Court yesterday Thomas Mcguire, 28, was charged with attempting to break into a shop in Regent-street, Redfern, occupied by William Hoskings. Richard Henry Brewin, a special constable employed on Regent-street, stated that he heard a noise about 2.30 am on Saturday last. The noise awakened the inmates, and witness followed and caught accused. Accused set upon him twice, and was perfectly sober at the time. Mr TM Williamson, who appeared for the defence, asked Brewin how many cases he had had during the last two months, and whether he got half the fines. “That’s nothing to do with it,” replied Brewin. Constable Quelch stated that when arrested accused was drunk. Mr O’Malley Clarke said that he did not see where the case was. Accused was discharged.

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Evening News, Fri 18 Dec 1891 6

POLICE.
————

REDFERN.

    For assaulting Richard Henry Brewin, a special constable, Hector Colquhoun, 28, was fined £5, or two months’ hard labor.

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Evening News, Sat 26 Mar 1892 7

POLICE.
————

REDFERN.

    Hector Colquhoun, 30, charged with assaulting Richard Henry Brewin, was remanded till Tuesday.

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Evening News, Wed 30 Mar 1892 8

ASSAULT.
————

    At the Redfern Police Court yesterday Hector Colquhoun, 25, was charged with assaulting Richard Henry Brewin, by throwing stones. Prosecutor stated that the assault was committed on January 12. For the defence George Cavagnough was called, and stated that he had thrown the stone at prosecutor. Defendant said that he had been prosecuted by Brewin, who had prosecuted him on a previous occasion, and had received half the fine.

    Mr Giles: “Well he won’t be able to persecute you for another three months. You are sentenced to three months’ hard labor.” The witness Cavagnough was arrested in the court for assaulting Brewin, but it was afterwards decided to proceed by summons.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Fri 19 Aug 1892 9

A CURIOUS CASE.
————

    The hearing of the charge against Charles Nurse of burglariously breaking and entering the shop of John Rowan, 67 Regent-street, was continued yesterday at the Redfern Police Court.

    It will be remembered that accused was recently an informer in a number of “tote” cases. Rowan was one of those prosecuted, and before the cases came on identified accused as a man who had broken into his shop 11 months previously. Evidence for the defence was now called.

    Constable Dukes stated that he had been instructed to watch Rowan’s shop, and to get a respectable man to help him. On four occasions between July 29 and August 1 he saw accused enter Rowan’s shop while Rowan was present. Accused was wearing the same clothes as at present, but Rowan never laid any charge for burglary against him till the morning of the hearing of the “tote” cases. Matthews and Gilpin, two men also charged with offences under the Betting Houses Suppression Act, drew Rowan’s attention to accused, as he sat in the court. They remarked, “That’s the man that”s got us.” Rowan then gave accused in charge for burglary. About 5.30 am on September 16, 1891, witness was in the station when Rowan came in and said. “That —– Duke can watch me in the day. Here have I been struggling for an hour and a half with a burglar.” A few days previously Rowan had been fined £50 for keeping a “tote,” witness being one of the principal witnesses. Witness had known accused for a number of years, and he was a hard-working and respectable man.

    Richard Henry Brewin, a special constable, stated that he was on duty in Regent-street on the morning of the robbery. He was at Rowan’s shop about 4.30 am, but saw no signs of breakage. About 10 am he saw Rowan, who said to him” “You’re a pretty —– to allow a man’s window to be broken.” Witness said: “About 4 o’clock I was struggling with a man for an hour and a half, and there was not a policeman or a watchman passed the road.”

    Constable Joseph Cook, stated that he was on duty on Regent and other streets on the morning of the robbery. He passed Rowan’s shop at 4.20 am, passed within 150 yards of it at 4.45 am, and again at 5.10 am. If Rowan had called out he would have heard him. Later in the day he heard that the window had been broken. Rowan told him it had been done at 4 am, and that he had been struggling with a man for an hour and a half. All the shops close to Rowan’s place are occupied as residences. He had seen accused daily for the last two years going to and returning from work, and always believed him to be a respectable man. Rowan told witness that the window was insured, but that the writing on it was not.

    The accused was discharged.

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Evening News, Wed 15 Mar 1893 10

POLICE.
————

REDFERN.


    Henry Miller, 46, was sentenced to six weeks’ hard labor for assaulting Richard Henry Brewin, a special constable. He was remanded till Thursday on a charge of having cigars in his possession supposed to have been stolen.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 9 Nov 1898 11

POLICE COURTS.
———◦———


    A Series of Charges.—At the Redfern Police Court yesterday, before Mr Smithers, SM, Robert Thompson, aged 28, was charged with having assaulted Annie Gleeson on the Newtown-road on Saturday night last. Mr Herbert appeared for the prosecution. Constable Brennan stated that on Saturday he was on the Newtown-road in plain clothes. He saw the accused pick up a stone about 10 pm and strike a woman with it. Witness went over and arrested him. Annie Gleeson stated that the accused had been in the habit of calling out to her “Big Annie.” She on Saturday night saw him on the Newtown-road, and went to him and asked him why he kept calling out to her. He struck her on the head with something he had in his hand, which proved to be a stone. He then knocked her down and was jumping on her when Constable Brennan came on the scene. The accused pleaded not guilty, and gave evidence denying the assault. Mr Smithers ordered the accused to be imprisoned, with hard labour, for three months. The accused was then charged with having on the same occasion assaulted Richard H Brewin, a night watchman, who went to the assistance of Constable Brennan, by striking him on the face. A sentence of imprisonment for one month was imposed, to commence at the expiration of the sentence imposed in the previous case. The accused was further charged with having on the same occasion used bad language, within the hearing of persons passing on the Newtown-road. For this offence the accused was ordered to pay a fine of £5, in default a further term of imprisonment for three months.

 


1    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 12 May 1893, p. 6.

2    The Daily Telegraph, Thu 15 Jun 1893, p. 3.

3    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 15 Jun 1893, p. 6.

4    The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 15 Jun 1893, p. 3.

5    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 23 Sep 1891, p. 6. Emphasis added.

6    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 18 Dec 1891, p. 2.

7   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 26 Mar 1892, p. 7.

8    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 30 Mar 1892, p. 6. Emphasis added.

9    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 19 Aug 1892, p. 2. Emphasis added.

10  Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 15 Mar 1893, p. 3.

11  The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 9 Nov 1898, p. 7. Emphasis added.