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1892, James Wilson - Unfit For Publication
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James Wilson and Ernest Blackstone
, 1892 

Below also see: James Wilson and Ernest Blackstone, 1893 – Police conspiracy
Ernest Blackstone, 1900-1903

 

Evening News, Thu 13 Oct 1892 1

YESTERDAY’S BREVITIES.
————


    Two respectable-looking men named Ernest Blackstone, 27, clerk, and James Wilson, 56, bootmaker, appeared at the Water Police Court to-day on a charge of having behaved indecently in Phillip Park. Mr Smithers, DSM, made the charge an indictable one and committed both for trial to the quarter sessions.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 15 Nov 1892 2

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
————
MONDAY
(Before his Honor Judge BACKHOUSE and juries.)

    Mr Browning prosecuted on behalf of the Crown.

    The cases set down for hearing to-day are—Richard Gray and Daniel Armstrong Small, larceny and receiving; George David Solomon, housebreaking; James Wilson and Ernest Blackstone, exposure.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Thu 17 Nov 1892 3

QUARTER SESSIONS.
————
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16.
(Before Judge Backhouse.)

    Mr Browning  prosecuted on behalf of the Crown.

ALLEGED INDECENCY.

    James Wilson and Ernest Blackstone, two respectable-looking men, pleaded not guilty to a charge of having, on the night of October 11 last, committed an act of indecency in Phillip Park, [now called Cook and Phillip Park].  Mr WJ Hill appeared for Wilson and Mr Charles Bull for Blackstone. After hearing the evidence of the police, also the statement of one of the accused, the jury, without hearing any addresses, said they were unanimously of the opinion that the accused were not guilty. They were accordingly discharged.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Thu 17 Nov 1892 4

YESTERDAY’S BREVITIES.
————


    Two respectable-looking men named James Wilson and Ernest Blackstone were charged at the quarter sessions to day with having on October 11 last committed an act of indecency in Phillip Park, near Woolloomooloo-street. Wilson was defended by Mr Hill, and Blackstone by Mr C Bull. The jury after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of acquittal, and the accused were discharged.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 17 Nov 1892 5

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
————
WEDNESDAY
(Before his Honor Judge BACKHOUSE and juries.)

    Mr Browning prosecuted on behalf of the Crown.

ALLEGED UNLAWFUL ACT.

    James Wilson and Ernest Blackstone were charged with having on the 11th October last acted in an unlawful manner in Phillip Park. Wilson was defended by Mr Hill, and Mr C Bull appeared for Blackstone. Evidence of the police having been taken, a statement was made by the accused Wilson, and the jury, without wishing to hear addresses or his Honor’s summing-up, and without leaving the box, acquitted both of the accused. 

 


 

James Wilson and Ernest Blackstone, 1893 - Police Conspiracy

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 1 Mar 1893 6

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
————
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28.
———

    The Speaker took the chair at half-past 4 o’clock.

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS.


    Mr SLATTERY, in answer to Mr Haynes, said an application was made during last month to the Vacation Judge (Mr Justice Foster) for an order for leave to institute proceedings for perjury against the two constables who arrested Blackstone and gave evidence against him. His Honor considered that the matter should be referred to the Judge who tried the case at Quarter Sessions, and the papers were therefore submitted to Judge Backhouse, who, for certain reasons stated by him, refused the application. The question as to wether, under these circumstances, and in view of the provisions of section 300 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act of 1884, as to committal for perjury, any proceedings could be taken against the men had now been submitted to him by the Minister of Justice, and it was a matter for serious consideration whether, in view of the facts stated, any prosecution for perjury could be instituted. In any event he could not take any departmental action, for the police force was under the Ministerial control of the Colonial Secretary.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 10 May 1893 7

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
————
TUESDAY, MAY 9.
———

    The Speaker took the chair at half-past 4 o’clock.

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS.

    Mr BARTON, in answer to Mr Farnell, for Mr Haynes, said with reference to the alleged perjury by two policemen in the case of Ernest Blackstone, that the Judge [Backhouse] before whom Blackstone and another were tried declined to grant leave to prosecute the two policemen for perjury. He had been asked by the Minister for Justice to advise whether, notwithstanding such refusal, and the provisions of section 300 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, any proceedings for the alleged perjury could be taken against the policemen in question. His opinion was that the law prevented the initiation of such proceedings after the refusal of the Judge to grant leave to prosecute. He would confer with the Minister of Justice on the matter of giving defendant an opportunity of vindicating his character. After a very careful perusal of the evidence taken at the trial, he had not the slightest doubt that both Blackstone and the other person accused were wholly innocent.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Tue  14 Nov 1893 8

POLICEMEN IN TROUBLE.
————
PROSECUTION FOR CONSPIRACY.
————

    Summonses have been issued at the Water Police Court against Senior- constable Gorman and Constable Byers, charging them with having on October 11, 18992, conspired between themselves to falsely charge and accuse James Wilson and Ernest B Blackston [sic] of behaving in an indecent manner in Phillip Park. The prosecution, which has been directed by the Attorney-General, has been pending for some time, and the summonses, which are returnable for Wednesday, the 15th instant, were issued by Mr CN Payten, Chamber Magistrate, on informations signed by Inspector Bremner, [sic–Brennan] in whose division the two officers were stationed.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Singleton Argus, Wed 15 Nov 1893 9

POLICEMEN CHARGED.
———◦———

AT the Sydney Water Police Summons Court on Monday morning,

    Senior-constable Gorman and Constable Byerare [sic–Byers] to appear at he Sydney Water Police Court to-day to answer a serious charge. In the information laid against them on Monday afternoon they are accused with having on October 11, 1892, between themselves, conspired falsely to charge and accuse James Wilson [and] Ernest Blackstone of indecent behaviour. Inspector Brennan is conducting the prosecution.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Thu 16 Nov 1893 10

PROSECUTION OF POLICEMEN.
———◦———
 A SERIOUS CHARGE.
————

Sydney, Wednesday.

SENIOR-CONSTABLE GORMAN and Constable Byers were before the Water Police Court to-day to answer to an information charging them with having on October 11, 1892, conspired between themselves to falsely charge and accuse Ernest B Blackstone and James Wilson of behaving indecently in Phillip Park.

   Mr Healy said the facts of the case were that on the night of October 11 Wilson and Blackstone left Her Majesty’s Theatre together. They passed through Hyde Park, where they sat down for some time. After leaving Hyde Park the men went into Phillip Park, and there transacted some private business. They then left the park and started off in different directions for their homes. Blackstone was first accosted by [senior-constable] Gorman, and shortly afterwards Wilson was stopped by [constable] Byers. Upon asking what they had done to be arrested they were told that they would know soon enough. They were then conveyed to the Woolloomooloo watchhouse, where a charge was preferred against them for behaving indecently in Phillip Park. In due course Wilson and Blackstone were brought before the Water Police Court, from which they were committed for trial on the charge of indecency. Evidence in support of the charge was given by Gorman and Byers, both of whom swore that they saw the offence committed. The offers further declared that the night was a bright moonlight one, and that they were, therefore, able to see clearly all that went on. It would be shown, however, hat the night was not a moonlight one. Wilson and Blackstone stood their trial at the Quarter Sessions, where, however, they were found not guilty, and discharged, the jury acquitting the men after hearing the evidence of Wilson, in the course of the evidence Richard Sellors, Sydney Observatory, gave evidence that the night of October 11, 1892, was a dark one, the moon not rising until 20 minutes after midnight.

    The case was adjourned until Friday afternoon next.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 16 Nov 1893 11

CHARGES AGAINST CONSTABLES.
———◦———

    At the Water Police Court yesterday, in the Summons Division, before Mr Delohery, SM, Senior-constable John Richard Gorman and Constable John Byers were charged that on the 11th day of October 1892, they did conspire between themselves falsely to charge and accuse James Wilson and Ernest B Blackston [sic] with misconduct in Phillip Park.

    Mr PJ Healy, instructed by the Crown Solicitor, appeared to prosecute; and Mr JC Gannon, instructed by Mr S Bull, appeared for the defence.

    Mr Healy, in opening the case, said that the facts were shortly the Blackston and Wilson left the theatre together on the night of the 11th October of last year and went through Hyde Park, sitting down for some time on a seat. Blackston having some private business to broach, asked Wilson to go into Phillip Park, and there after discussing their affairs a loan was effected from Wilson to Blackston. They then went in different directions for home. Blackston was first stopped by constable Gorman, and shortly afterwards Wilson was arrested by Byers. Blackston asked what they were arrested for, and Gorman said they would find out fast enough. Byers, in reply to Wilson, gave the same answer. They were taken to the Woolloomooloo police station close by, and after some whispering between the constables, they were charged and detained, and subsequently got bail. As soon as they knew what the charge was, Wilson asked that a doctor be sent for and he would pay the expenses. The two men were brought up at the police court, when the two constables appeared in support of the charge. After hearing the evidence the magistrate thought that the charge should be altered to one of a more serious nature. In support of the charge, both constables swore to details. The result was that the accused persons were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions, and the constables appeared again to give evidence to the same effect as before. The jury, however, after hearing one of the defendants, stopped the case and acquitted them.

    Evidence was given in support of counsel’s opening statement, and the further hearing of the case was adjourned to Friday. Accused were allowed bail on their own recognisances of £20.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 18 Nov 1893 12

CHARGE OF CONSPIRACY.
———◦———

    In the Summons Division of the Water Police Court yesterday, before Mr Delohery,, SM, the hearing of the charge of conspiracy brought against Senior-constable John Richard Gorman and Constable John Byers was concluded. The men who had been arrested by the accused were examined, and, after other evidence had been called, the magistrate held that a case had not been made out. He therefore discharged the men who were before the Court. 

 


 

Ernest Blackstone, 1900-1903 

 

Evening News, Sat 20 Oct 1900 13

STAGELAND.
———◦———


    Mr Charles Holloway, who went to England for the benefit of his health, has written to his former business manager, Mr Ernest Blackstone, under date September 7, and among other things he says: “I am getting along alright, and the doctors say that my health will be better than it has been for years. I hope so, I am at present at Margate, sniffing the balmy breezes’ for the benefit of my health; next week I am going to Scotland for a few weeks, when I hope to be thoroughly recovered. After that I shall stick to London, seeing and reading pieces, till my departure for Australia, which, I think, will be by the Ortona, on November 9, arriving in Sydney just in time for Christmas. Then I shall settle down to get ready my new pieces for another Australian tour.” Mr and Mrs Holloway desire to be remembered to all friends. Mr Blackstone, who has been managing the Baden-Baden Hotel, Coogee, proceeds to New Zealand, where he will pilot Mr CR Stanford’s company. Mr Stanford, who did the “heavies” with Mr Holloway, has taken over that manager’s dates in Maoriland, and will produce the Holloway repertoire.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Sat 12 Jan 1901 14

STAGELAND.
———◦———


    Mr Ernest Blackstone, manager for Mr CR Stanford, writing from Dunedin under date December 29, states that the company produced “The Power and the Glory” on Boxing Night to one of the largest houses ever known in that city. “The piece went like wildfire,: says Mr Blackstone, “and business has been excellent ever since.” The next production was to be “A Soldier and a Man.” the Dunedin season closed on January 12, and the company opens in Oamaru on January 14, Timaru January 16, and Christchurch January 21. Mr Chas Holloway, whose plays Mr Stanford is producing, cabled congratulations to the company, and good wishes for a prosperous New Year. Mr CG Westmacott is supporting Mr Stanford.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Sat 12 Apr 1902 15

BREVITIES.
———◦———


    Mr Ernest Blackstone, who has been associated with Mr Charles Holloway for some years as business manager, has been appointed treasurer of Mr Harry Rickards’s theatre in Brisbane. Mr Blackstone left for Brisbane on Thursday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Sat 27 Jun 1903 16

STAGELAND.
———◦———


    Mr Charles Holloway’s Company, with an extensive repertoire, including “Two Little Vagabonds,” “Because I Love You,” and “The Price of Sin,” is playing at His Majesty’s Theatre,, Brisbane. Miss Beatrice Holloway, daughter of the proprietor, has received much praise at the hands of the critics for her portrayal of the leading characters. Mr Ernest Blackstone is “in front.”

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Sat 7 Nov 1903 17

STAGELAND.
———◦———


    With respect to the medal throwing incident at the Criterion Theatre related in a sketch of Mr Orlando Daly’s career in the London “Era,” and referred to in this column last week, as not having been generally reported, it appears that this view of the matter is correct. Mr Ernest Blackstone, at the time manager for Mr Charles Holloway, on being spoken to on the subject, stated that the matter never came under his notice. 

 


1    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 13 Oct 1892, p. 6.

2    The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 15 Nov 1892, p. 3. Emphasis added.

3    The Daily Telegraph, Thu 17 Nov 1892, p. 3.

4    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 17 Nov 1892, p. 6.

5    The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 17 Nov 1892, p. 4.

6    The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 1 Mar 1893, p. 5. Emphasis added.

7    The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 10 May 1893, p. 5. Emphasis added.

8    Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 14 Nov 1893, p. 5.

9    Singleton Argus, Wed 15 Nov 1893, p. 4. Emphasis added.

10  Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Thu 16 Nov 1893, p. 5. Emphasis added.

11  The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 16 Nov 1893, p. 3. Emphasis added.

12  The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 18 Nov 1893, p. 7.

13  Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 20 Oct 1900, p. 4. Emphasis added.

14  Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 12 Jan 1901, p. 4. Emphasis added.

15  Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 12 Apr 1902, p. 4. Emphasis added. 

16  Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 27 Jun 1903, p. 1. Emphasis added.

17  Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 7 Nov 1903, p. 3. Emphasis added.