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1887, Alfred Marshe and John Kelly - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: Alfred E Marshe, 1908

 

The Daily Telegraph, Sat 5 Nov 1887 1

QUARTER SESSIONS.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5.
(Before His Honor Judge Dowling.)

    Mr Clarke Irving prosecuted on behalf of the Crown.

ALLEGED UNNATURAL OFFENCE.

    John Kelly, a young man, and Alfred Marsh [aka Marshe], an old man, pleaded not guilty to a charge of having attempted to commit an unnatural offence. The jury were unable to agree on a verdict and were locked up for the night.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Sat 5 Nov 1887 2

BREVITIES.
————


    In the case of the charge against John Kelly and Alfred Marsh, [sic] at the Quarter Sessions, yesterday, the jury were unable to agree, and were locked up for the night. This morning they brought in a verdict of guilty. Sentence deferred.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 5 Nov 1887 3

QUARTER SESSIONS.
FRIDAY.
(Before Mr District Court Judge DOWLING.)

CHARGE OF UNNATURAL OFFENCE.

    John Kelly, a youth about 18, and Alfred Marsh, a man about 55, were indicted for attempting to commit an unnatural offence on the night of the 4th October last, on the Circular Quay. At 6 o’clock the jury were locked up for the night, not having agreed upon their verdict.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Tue 8 Nov 1887 4

LAW.
———◦———
QUARTER SESSIONS.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8.
(Before His Honor Judge Dowling.)

THE CROWN.

    Mr TGJ Foster, son of Mr WJ Foster, QC, stated that he had been appointed to act as Crown prosecutor during the remainder of the sessions.

SENTENCE.

    Alfred Marsh and John Kelly, who were found guilty on Saturday on an indictment charging them with having attempted to commit an unnatural offence, were placed in the dock for sentence.

    His Honor said the case was in itself a remarkable one, and there were many peculiarities in it. The evidence was, however, as clear to his mind as noonday, and how the jury could have had any doubt about it he could not imagine. The crime was an abominable one, not to be mentioned in the hearing of man. They had recommended the prisoner Marsh to mercy, on what ground he could not say, but inconsideration of that prisoner’s age he would give effect to it. The sentence of the Court was that he should be imprisoned for four years and on Monday next to be privately whipped with 12 strokes. In Kelly’s case the sentence was five years’ penal servitude and on Monday next a private whipping of 24 strokes.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 8 Nov 1887 5

DARLINGHURST QUARTER SESSIONS.
Monday.
(Before Mr District Court Judge DOWLING.)

UNNATURAL OFFENCE.

    John Kelly, 20, and Alfred Marsh, 55, who were on Saturday found guilty of an unnatural offence, were brought up for sentence.

    HIS HONOR, addressing Marsh, said the jury had recommended him to mercy, but why they had done so he (the Judge) could not say; he, however, would give effect to that recommendation, and would sentence him to four years’ imprisonment, in addition, ordered him to receive a whipping of 12 strokes privately with the instrument known as the “cat,” on Monday next. With Kelly the case was different, and he would be sentenced to five years’ penal servitude; and, in addition, would be privately whipped with 24 strokes of the cat on Monday next.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queanbeyan Age, Wed 9 Nov 1887 6

MORT & CO REPORT.—


    At the Sydney Quarter Sessions on Monday, John Kelly and Alfred Marsh [sic] were found guilty of an unnatural offence. The former was sentenced to five years and 24 lashes on Monday next; the later was also sentenced to four years and twelve lashes next Monday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 15 Nov 1887 7

NEWS OF THE DAY.
———◦———


    John Kelly, a youth, and Alfred Marsh, a grey-headed old man, received respectively 24 and 12 lashes in the Darlinghurst Gaol quadrangle yesterday evening, as part punishment for the commission of an abominable offence. Kelly, who was the first to undergo a flogging, howled and yelled piteously at the top of his voice whilst the flagellator was applying the cat to his bared shoulders. Marsh, a thick-set, well developed man, bore his chastisement stoically at first; but, after seven strokes of the cat-o’-nine-tails had fallen, he screamed in agony, and eventually he had to be led from the triangles to the cells. Both culprits felt their punishment acutely.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Wed 16 Nov 1887 8

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS.
————


    FLOGGING.—The convicts John Kelly and Alfred Marsh, [sic] who were sentenced to 5 years and twenty-four lashes and 4 years and twelve lashes respectively by Judge Dowling, at the Quarter Sessions on Wednesday last, received their whipping in Darlinghurst [gaol] on Monday afternoon. John Kelly, who is a powerful youth, took his punishment very badly. From the fall of the first stroke to the last he yelled with his utmost power, at times begging the governor, in piteous accents, for mercy, and watching every motion of the flagellator with a terrified expression on his countenance. Alfred Marsh, who is the elderly man, comported himself much better at the offset, but groaned and yelled from the fifth stroke till his punishment was completed. Both men bore their chastisement worse than any prisoners flogged in Darlinghurst for a long time past.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Thu 17 Nov 1887 9

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS.
————


    The convicts John Kelly and Alfred Marsh, who were sentenced to 5 years and twenty-four lashes and 4 years and twelve lashes respectively by Judge Dowling, at the Quarter Sessions on Wednesday last, received their whipping in Darlinghurst on Monday afternoon (says the Evening News). John Kelly, who is a powerful youth, took his punishment very badly. From the fall of the first stroke to the last he yelled with his utmost power, at times begging the governor, in piteous accents, for mercy, and watching every motion of the flagellator with a terrified expression on his countenance. Alfred Marsh, who is the elderly man, comported himself much better at the offset, but groaned and yelled from the fifth stroke till his punishment was completed. Both men bore their chastisement worse than any prisoners flogged in Darlinghurst for a long time past.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Alfred Marsh, Gaol photo sheet 10

SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6048], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886-1887, No. 4003, p. 251, R5102.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 4003

Date when Portrait was taken: 7-10-1887

Name: Alfred Marsh

Native place: England

Year of birth: 1828

Arrived       Ship: Agincourt
in Colony }   Year: 1847

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Seaman

Religion: C of E

Education, degree of: RW

Height: 5' 9"

Weight     On committal: 179
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Brown to grey

Colour of eyes: Blue

Marks or special features: Anchor on Right Forearm Flower Po on upper, lost several upper teeth

Where and when tried: Sydney Q.S.
5 November 1887

Offence: Attempted Buggery

Sentence: 4 years HL + 12 strokes on the 14 November 1887

Remarks: Recommended to mercy on account of his simplicity

Convicted with John Kelly

(No. of previous Portrait ... ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

 

 

 

 

Nil

 

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

John Kelly, Gaol photo sheet 11

SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6048], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886-1887, No. 4004, p. 252, R5102.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 4004

Date when Portrait was taken: 13-10-1887

Name: John Kelly
(aka Joe Bland)

Native place: Isle of Man

Year of birth: 1867

Arrived       Ship: Manx King
in Colony }   Year: 1885

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Laborer

Religion: R Cath

Education, degree of: RW

Height: 5' 8¼"

Weight     On committal: 134
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Blue

Marks or special features: Naked Woman on Left Fore arm

Where and when tried: Sydney Q.S.
5 November 1887

Offence: attempted Buggery

Sentence: 5 years P.S. + 24 strokes on Monday 14 November 1887

Remarks: Guilty

Committed with Alfred Marsh

(No. of previous Portrait ... ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

WPO

CPO

WPO

CPO

21

22

17

28

  5

  7

  5

  3

1885

1885

1886

1887

Assault

Stealing

Drunk

Suspected Person

2 months C

9 months L

7 days C

6 months L

 


 

Alfred E Marshe, 1908

 

The Daily Telegraph, Tue 7 Apr 1908 12

FATALITIES AND ACCIDENTS.
———◦———

FALL FROM A TRAM.

    Alfred E Marsh (71), clerk, residing at 75 Samuel-street, St Peters, was attempting to board a tram at the corner of Hunter and Pitt streets yesterday, when he fell. He was taken to the Sydney Hospital, where it was found that his foot was badly crushed. He was admitted for treatment.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 7 Apr 1908 13

CASUALTIES.
———◦———
MAN’S FOOT CRUSHED BY TRAM.
————

    Alfred E Marsh, 71 years of age, residing at 75 Samuel-street, St Peters, fell in trying to board a railway tram in Pitt-street yesterday afternoon. One of his feet slipped under the wheels, which passed over it, almost severing the foot. He was conveyed to the Sydney Hospital, where the foot was amputated.

 


1     The Daily Telegraph, Sat 5 Nov 1887, p. 10.

2     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 5 Nov 1887, p. 6.

3     The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 5 Nov 1887, p. 8.

4     The Daily Telegraph, Tue 8 Nov 1887, p. 3.

5     The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 8 Nov 1887, p. 4.

6     Queanbeyan Age, Wed 9 Nov 1887, p. 3.

7     The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 15 Nov 1887, p. 7.

8     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 16 Nov 1887, p. 6.

9     The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Thu 17 Nov 1887, p. 8.

10   SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6048], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886-1887, No. 4003, p. 251, R5102.

11   SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6048], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886-1887, No. 4004, p. 252, R5102.

12   The Daily Telegraph, Tue 7 Apr 1908, p. 5.

13   The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 7 Apr 1908, p. 8.