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1899, Edward Liton Carns Wilson - Unfit For Publication
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Edward Liton Carns Wilson, 1893
Below also see: Edward Liton Carns Wilson, 1899

 

The Advertiser, Tue 15 Aug 1893 1

INSOLVENCY COURT—ADELAIDE.

APPOINTMENTS.
Tuesday, August 15, at 10 o’clock.


    First Hearings.—Robert Harold Martin, John Kuttelwesch, and Edward Carns Wilson.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Barrier Miner, Thu 21 Sep 1893 2

BROKEN HILL ACADEMY
————

MR E WILSON, MA, FRGS, has succeed Mr Young as principal of the above school. Mr Wilson has been a most successful teacher for the past 18 years, and has taught at Kind’s College, Melbourne, and at The King’s School, Parramatta, New South Wales. He comes to us with very high testimonials. Evening classes and private tuition can be arranged for. Mr Wilson’s address is No, 5 Oxide-street.

 



Edward Liton Carns Wilson
, 1899

 

Queensland police memo, Fri 16 Dec 1898 3

C[riminal] I[nvestigation] Branch
George Street, [Brisbane]
16-12-[18]98

Memo

    A warrant has been issued by the Ipswich Bench for the arrest of Edward Liton Carns Wilson, charged with committing an unnatural offence on a boy. Description:—English; 50 years of age; 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high, dark hair and moustache (only), turning grey, rather large straight nose; limps when walking; is accompanied by his son, 11 years of age, and who is paralyzed [sic] in both legs; left Ipswich by train for Brisbane on the 10th instant, and put up at the Metropolitan Hotel, Edward Street, where he remained till Monday when he was driven to Melbourne Street Station by a cabman, with the intention (apparently) of going to Southport but did not do so. Offender’s wife resides at either Melbourne or Adelaide, and he may endeavour to leave by steamer for those ports; Arrest desirable.

[signed] JM Hobday, Sgt
pro Inspector

    [Hand written note] Posted to all principal stations Moreton District. Circulated to all stations Brisbane District 16/12/98

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, Fri 16 Dec 1898

Copy of Telegram

C-I- Branch
Brisbane 16-12-98

    To Officers in Charge of Police,

Southport, Nerang, Tallebudgerra [sic], Toowoomba, Warwick, Stanthorpe, and Wallangarra.

    Warrant issued by Ipswich Bench, arrest Edward Liton Carus Wilson for having committed an unnatural offence on a boy.

    Description:—Englishman, About 50 years, 5 feet 6 or 7 inches. Dark hair and moustache only, turning grey, rather large straight nose limps when walking. May have son with him, eleven years old who is paralyzed [sic] both legs, has small two-wheel cart for driving son about. Supposed gone up line. Arrest very desirable.

(Signed) F Urquhart
Inspector.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, Mon 19 Dec 1898

Copy of Telegram

C-I- Branch
Brisbane 19th December 1898

    To Officer in Charge of Police,

Southport

    My wire sixteenth instant, Wilson may not have taken his son with him.

(Signed) F Urquhart
Inspr. I/C.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police letter, Wed 21 Dec 1898

Copy of letter

The Inspector General of Police
    Sydney, also to Melbourne & Adelaide

C-I- Branch
Brisbane 21th Dec 1898

Sir/
    I have the honor to forward herewith crime report concerning Edward Liton Carus Wilson MA wanted on warrant for committing sodomy, and to request you will please have inquiries made about him with a view of effecting his arrest.

I have the honor to be
Sir             
Your obedient Servant
J Stuart
Sgd W[illiam] E[dward] P[arry-]Okeden
pro Commissioner of Police

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, Wed 21 Dec 1898

Copy of Telegram

C-I- Branch
Brisbane, 21-12-1898

To Commissioner of Police, Adelaide

    EC Wilson MA of Oxford who formerly kept school in North Adelaide and was than known to L Cohen, (Mayor of Adelaide) wanted here on warrant If any information obtainable of present whereabouts, please wire.

(Signed) J Stuart
pro Commissioner of Police

    [Hand written note] Letters in similar terms were sent to Sydney & Melbourne same date.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 31 Dec 1898 4

————————
LOST REWARDS, &C.
—————————

£5 REWARD for information that will lead to the recovery of a BOY, last seen between Oxley and Ipswich; age 16, fair complexion, one tooth missing in the front, and dressed in light tweed clothes with black and white straw hat; was riding a piebald mare branded J7H, with J on the neck.

FRED HILL, Saddler, Nundah.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, Fri 6 Jan 1899

Copy of Telegram

C-I- Branch
Brisbane 6th January 1899

    Inspector General of Police

Sydney and same to Melbourne & Adelaide

    Re Edward Liton Carus Wilson, see Queensland Police Gazette, supplement 24th December last, photo 55. Is now strongly suspected of having murdered Alfred Hill, missing friend, [see below] see same Gazette page 504. Please make strictest inquiries and circulate throughout your Colony.

(Signed) J Stuart
Chief Inspector.

————
MISSING FRIENDS.

    Information is requested, at the instance of J Halliday, Nundah, as to the present whereabouts of Alfred Hill, who left his home at Nundah on the 10th instant, riding a piebald pony branded J7H near shoulder, with the intention of visiting his aunt (Mrs Greaves) at Redbank Plains, but he has not since been heard of. He is between 15 and 16 years of age, 5' 2" high, fair complexion, light hair, blue eyes, straight nose; a saddler, and native of Qld; was wearing light clothes; very boyish-looking. Information to the Officer in Charge of the Criminal Investigations Branch, Brisbane.—O. 1643. 20th December, 1898.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegrams, Sat 7 Jan 1899

Copy of telegrams

7th January 1899

Rule 6

To, All Inspectors of Districts & sub-Districts and all Stations Moreton Districts

    Missing friend Alfred Hill see Police Gazette last year page 504 information received that the horse ridden by Hill, has been found shot dead in the bush near Oxley. Strongly suspected that Hill has been murdered by Edward Liton Carus Wilson, see Gazette supplement 24th December last. Photo (55) Every possible effort must be made to effect the arrest of this offender. Circulate information to every Station in your District

Signed J Stuart C Inspr
pro Commander

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, Sat 7 Jan 1899

Copy of telegram

7th January 1899

    Officer of Police

Murwillumbah

    Re Edward Liton Carus Wilson vide Queensland Police Gazette supplement 24th December last. Photo 55 now strongly suspected having murdered “missing friend”, Alfred Hill, see same Gazette page 504 description of John Wilson your Crime report 28th December last, wanted for Obscene language exposure, tallies with description Edward Liton Carus Wilson. Please make every possible effort to trace offender and wire surrounding Stations, and wire me fullest particulars obtainable re your John Wilson.

Signed J Stuart
Chief Inspector.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, Sat 7 Jan 1899

Copy of telegram

7th January 1899

    To Commissioner of Police,

Perth, WA and Police Albany

    Warrant issued Ipswich Bench Arrest Edward Leighton Carus Wilson, committing unnatural offence on boy, description, 50 years, looks younger. About 5 feet eight medium build, Dark hair & moustache turning grey. May shave or otherwise alter appearance rather large straight nose, suffers from Sciatica, limps, Englishman, Master Arts Oxford. Good linguist, taught school Adelaide some time ago. May have boy eleven years, paralyzed [sic] both legs with him, believed on board “Yarrawonga” Left Melbourne second inst calling Albany, he is also strongly suspected of Murder. Make every possible effort to effect his arrest.

(Signed) J Stuart
Chief Inspector pro Commander

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Sat 7 Jan 1899 5

MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE
OF A BOY.
——◦——
SUPPOSED MURDER.
———
BODY OF THE HORSE FOUND.
———

    The metropolitan as well as the provincial police have had their hands pretty full in their endeavours to unravel one of the greatest outrages that has been recorded in the Australian annals of crime for some years past; but from facts which came to our knowledge yesterday evening, it would appear that they are now face to face with another occurrence, if not a crime, just as mysterious as the terrible Gatton tragedy. It is surrounded by circumstances which point to the conclusion that another murder has been committed. Many of our readers will probably remember reading the following advertisement whch [sic] appeared a few days before Christmas:— “Public notice. Lost in bush, between Oxley and Ipswich, last seen near Goodna, a boy, 16 years of age, dressed fawn serge pants, gray coat, and black straw hat; was riding a piebald pony branded J7H. Anyone knowing whereabouts communicate station-master, Goodna, or Fred Hill, Nundah.”

    The boy’s father, who carries on business at Nundah as a saddler, states that his son left his home shortly after 2 o’clock on Saturday afternoon, 10th December, riding a piebald pony, and with the intention of going to his aunt’s at Redbank Plains. He was also to deliver a letter to a Mrs Catchpole, who was a friend of the family, and resided at Oxley. It appears that he reached Oxley that evening, delivered the letter, and went on his way in the direction of Redbank Plains. The boy was never seen again. He was to have returned home on the following Monday; but his parents, when they found he did not, consoled themselves with the thought that he had prolonged his stay at his aunt’s residence. As he did not arrive home on Tuesday, however, his father drove over to Redbank Plains, and to his amazement discovered that the boy had never reached there. That night the father came on to Brisbane, and on Wednesday reported the matter at the Criminal Investigation Branch, but was advised to advertise it in the “Police Gazette,” which, by the way, was not to appear till a week later. He was naturally exceedingly anxious, and not at all satisfied with this advice, and, subsequently meeting a detective whom he knew, succeeded in getting inquiries instituted. No trace, however, could be found of the missing boy. Sergeant Small, at Goodna, who was communicated with, considered it probable that the boy had gone away somewhere on his own account. The father, however, held a different opinion, as the boy had never shown any disposition to leave his home, for which, it appears, he had a great love. In fact, the little pocket-money he had, together with his watch, he left under his pillow when he departed, a circumstance which points unmistakeably to the conclusion that he intended to return. The search was continued, but without avail until Thursday, when a discovery was made which leaves little doubt of foul play. The police are very reticent on the subject, and almost decline, in fact, to give any information whatever.

    It appears, from information we have obtained from a reliable source, that on Thursday a man and a boy went out into the bush from Indooroopilly to look for gum for tanning purposes, when the boy found the dead carcass of the horse, which was ridden by the missing lad, about a mile beyond Oxley, on the way to Goodna, to which place, as already pointed out, he was going. Very little notice would probably have been taken of the horse but for the fact that it still had on the saddle and bridle. It was lying about a quarter of a mile off the Goodna road, and in a thick patch of scrub. The man and boy took off the saddle and bridle and conveyed them to the sergeant at Indooroopilly, and reported the discovery. The father of the missing lad was communicated with, and yesterday morning went with Mr Bridges, MLA, a mounted constable, and the sergeant from Goodna, to the place where the horse was lying. Mr Hill at once identified the horse, and on the animal being examined it was found that it had been shot through the forehead. The hair around the wound was singed, indicating thereby that the weapon used was fired at a very close range. The vicinity was then searched, and the remains of a fire were found a few chains from the horse, also portions of what appeared to be burnt flesh. The horse’s head was taken possession of by the constable, and was brought on to Brisbane yesterday evening, and placed in the stable at the police depot at Petrie-terrace. The pieces of burnt flesh were also secured, and have been submitted to examination by experts; but up to the present they have been unable to tell whether it is human flesh or not. These are the whole of the facts in the possession of the authorities at present respecting this mysterious affair.

    Another search party has been organised, and they will meet at the spot where the horse was found at 9 o’clock this morning, with the view of making a thorough investigation of the locality. It is surmised the horse was led into the place where it was found and then shot.

    No further information has been received by the authorities up to a late hour last night.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, Sun 8 Jan 1899

Copy of telegram

8th January 1899

    To—Officer of Police,

Albany, WA

    Re Wilson if arrested search closely for firearms. Keep boy strictly apart from him. Wilson may attempt suicide. Dangerous cunning man

(Signed) J Stuart
C[hief] Insp pro Comm[ander]

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police letter, Sun 8 Jan 1899

99.362 H Bay

West Moreton Sub-District
Police Station
Ipswich 8th January 1899

    Sen Sergt, E Johnson A201 reports that information reached Ipswich last night to the effect that Offender Wilson had committed suicide in Brisbane and in consequence of the report the bearer Mr Shand Acting Police Magistrate here decided on going to Brisbane to view the body and see if deceased is identical with Wilson with whom he was acquainted.

[signed] Edw Johnson
Sen Sergt No 362

[Wednesday May 15th 1878]

The Sub Inspr of Police.   B/C 152.99
Depot Brisbane    Chief Inspr Stuart Forwarded. Mr Shand went out to the Hospital yesterday
(Sunday) and saw the man referred to above, he is not identical with Wilson.

Commr Police
J Stuart 6
9.1.99

9.1.99              Jas Shepherd ( ?)
( ?) ( ?)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

G Hudson letter, c. Sun 8 Jan 1899

G[eorge] Hudson,
Chemist & Dentist,
Ipswich, Q.
[c. Sunday 8 January] 18[99]

    ELC Wilson had Teeth in lower jaw thickly covered with Tartar a case of “Pyrrhoea” [sic–Pyorrhoea] or Riggs disease, lower right first molar badly decayed, and should soon cause trouble, as he filled it himself with gutta percha [a natural form of rubber].

    GP away [initialled] HC

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

G Hudson letter, Sun 8 Jan 1899

G Hudson,
Chemist & Dentist,
Ipswich, Q.
[Sunday] 8 January 1899

Dear Mr Johnston [sic]

    Seeing by my ledger that it was August 26th that he bought Lloyds L’Euxesis for shaving and Pinauds Pommade Hongwise and he asked specially for that kind with “Brun” on it, it is about time he wanted some more, I send you this hoping it will be some help; he could only purchase these things at a Chemists who should do a high class biz to keep these things in stock

Yours faithfully
Geo Hudson

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police letter, Mon 9 Jan 1899

99.427.Port Curtis

West Moreton Sub-District
Police Station
Ipswich 9th January 1899

Re offender Edward Liton Carus Wilson

    Sen Sergt E Johnson A201 forward the attached memos received from Mr Hudson chemist who is of opinion that offender Wilson will consult some of the Dentists very shortly probably in Melbourne Adelaide or Broken Hill which places he often spoke of to Mr Hudson

[signed] Ed[ward] Johnson
Sen Sergt Reg No. 362

The Sub Inspt of Police
Ipswich                        } 

BC 19.99
Chief Inspr Stuart
Brisbane

Submitted
Edw Johnson Sen Sergt
Pro Sub Inspr 9.1.99

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Mon 9 Jan 1899 6

THE MISSING BOY.
———◦———
DISCOVERY OF THE BODY.
———
A HORRIBLE MURDER.
———
NO CLUE TO THE PERPETRATOR.
———

Brisbane, Saturday.

    With reference to the disappearance of the lad Hill from Goondah [sic–Goodna], particulars of which were wired yesterday, a search party went out this morning from Goondah. They proceeded to a spot about a mile from Oxley, and midway between Oxley and Darra, known as Burns and Walsh’s paddock. The police were here found actively engaged searching for traces of the boy in the vicinity of the spot where the remains of the pony had been found. The Goondah party first carefully examined a spot where it was supposed that something had been buried, but nothing was found. They then proceeded to search the paddocks, which are rather thickly timbered with wattle. While doing so they made a gruesome discovery 400 yards from the spot where the pony was found. It was the body of the missing boy, which was lying in some bushes at a spot about 600 yards from the Ipswich road.

    The utmost care was taken to prevent the body being disturbed. The police were at once informed, and they in turn took measures to keep the many people who soon began to congregate from approaching the spot. A message was meantime sent to Brisbane, asking for the immediate attendance of the Government medical officer. The relatives of the missing boy recognised the remains by the boots and whip, which lay near. A pair of trousers which had been rolled up and attached to the lad’s saddle when he left home were found lying on the ground. A very large number of people endeavoured to get to the spot, but the police prevented them, the remains being left exactly as found until the arrival of the medical officer.

The Ipswich Grammar School. Image: <em>Australian Town and Country Journal</em>, Sat 28 Jun 1873, p. 817. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
The Ipswich Grammar School. Image: Australian Town and Country
Journal
, Sat 28 Jun 1873, p. 817.
Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    Some information was elicited this morning which the police think may have a bearing on the case. It seems that on the evening of December 10 about two hours after the lad Hill was last seen alive, a man supposed to be Edward Lytton Caras Wilson arrived from Ipswich, went to the Oxley Hotel and had tea. He had with him a boy, whom he was wheeling in an invalid’s cart. The manner of the man was excited and uneasy, so much so that a servant girl became quite alarmed. In answer to the landlady he said he had come from Redbank, the invalid lad said, “No, father, from Ipswich,” but he told the boy to “hold his tongue.”

    Wilson was until recently the second-master at the Ipswich Grammar School, but in addition to his ordinary duties he held evening classes, which were attended by a large number of the boys in the town. He was a Master of Arts, and held other degrees, and was recognised as a man of much ability. In the beginning of December he relinquished his position on the staff of the Grammar School, giving as a reason that he intended starting a school of his own at Southport. He left Ipswich on 10th December, taking with him his son—a cripple boy of 11 years old. They took the train, but alighted at Riverview, Wilson wheeling his paralysed son along the road towards Brisbane in a small cart. On reaching Oxley they stayed for the night at the local hotel, and it was on this night that the murdered boy Hill passed through Oxley on his way to the residence of his aunt (Mrs Greaves) at Redbank Plains. On arriving with his son at Brisbane, Wilson stayed at the Metropolitan Hotel until 12th December, and he has since been traced from the capital to Southport and eventually to Murwillumbah, where the police lost sight of him. It is expected however, that he has made his way to the south, for his wife is supposed to reside in either Melbourne or Adelaide. After he left Ipswich a warrant was issued for his arrest on a serious charge. Wilson is believed to have come from Warrnambool originally. He is a man of 50 years of age, but appears to be much younger, wears a large, dark moustache, and has a slight limp, owing to the effects of sciatica. He was a prominent figure in church matters in Ipswich, frequently officiating as a lay-reader.

    The boy Hill was 15 years and six months old, and is said to have been of a very confiding, quiet nature, and rather timid. A careful examination of the remains leaves no doubt whatever that the unfortunate boy was murdered. The remains were face upwards, and very decomposed. A large sapling or bough was drawn over them by the murderer, nothing being visible but the boots and the bone of one leg, from which all the flesh had completely disappeared. Looking at the skull through the leaves, a large hole, such as would be caused by a bullet, was discernible in the top of the head. It is supposed the boy was taken into the paddock, subjected to maltreatment, and then shot, and that the horse was shot afterwards.

    From the position of the bullet-hole it would seem that the boy was shot while lying down. The remains, which appear to be only bones, were removed to Brisbane this evening.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Mon 9 Jan 1899 7

The Brisbane Courier.
————————
Monday, January 9, 1899.
———◦———

HORROR UPON HORROR.
———◦———

    Another tragedy has come to light, and this time within ten miles of the General Post Office. A quiet, inoffensive lad was apparently murdered at Oxley about a fortnight before Christmas; and what adds horror to horror is the news that a man against whom a warrant has been issued for [a] revolting crime at Ipswich, was probably in the immediate vicinity when young Hill was being done to death in the Oxley paddocks. It is unnecessary to connect these two things except as showing that we have now practically three dreadful tangles to unravel. The Gatton murder still stands first. All Australia is looking this way as the Queensland police make or mar their reputation by arresting, or by failing to arrest, the inhuman wretches responsible for one of the foulest deeds on record. But as though an awful pre-eminence were not enough in respect to the Gatton murder and outrage, the colony is now advertised still further by crimes which make a hideous track right down to Brisbane. Ipswich and Oxley form the intermediate links in a ghastly chain, whose weight will lie upon us like a nightmare for many a day. The lad so cruelly killed at Oxley was apparently lured to his death as were the members of the Murphy family at Gatton, and the way in which the horses were dispatched in each case seems to point to similar methods and identical motives. One naturally puzzles over a possible motive in regard to the murder of a retiring youth of 16 who had been sent from Brisbane on a message, and who had left both watch and chain at home. In some aspects of the case the motive is clear enough, but what sort of fiends have we loose in the community? Or, since so long time has elapsed since the last discovered deed was done, what sort of fiends have crossed our borders into adjacent colonies? Taking the two tragedies together, we have such a load to carry that until justice is done, the whole community—and Australia must be included in the term in these days of mutual hopes and fears—will cry aloud for vengeance. Men will listen to reason up to a certain point, but when crime bursts forth in this way they cannot be expected to take sober, satisfied views of the situation. Feelings can only find expression in deeds under some circumstances. We write so to point out that our duty as citizens is still to restrain any tendency to panic wherever it gives signs of asserting itself. The danger is lest a desperate demand for justice should lead to gross injustice. We are Britons after all, and fair play is still bonny play. Until a man is proved guilty, after trail by his peers, he is held to be innocent; and to allow suspicion of overmaster our love for liberty and impartiality is to lay the reins upon the neck of passion and ride to ruin. Even with the present awful array of crimes to sheet home to their authors we must still be willing to believe suspected persons innocent until found guilty. An emergency has arisen in which our self-restraint and good sense will be put to the test, and in which our claim to citizenship in an Empire founded upon truth and justice will be demonstrated or made ridiculous.

    The need for keeping a strong guard upon temper at the present juncture would not be so imperative were there no thought of bungling in connection with each of the three tangles before us. As a matter of fact the police have failed to justify their existence as guardians of the public peace in the two tragedies, if not in connection with the Ipswich horror. It becomes, therefore, more difficult to discuss matters temperately and with a steady regard for the majesty of the law. Yet the duty is laid upon every citizen to be just and temperate; and because of this duty we are bound also to discuss the bungling and so make further failure difficult. At Gatton itself the possibilities of successful detection were made nearly hopeless at the commencement by a lack of organisation which allowed tracks to be obliterated and clues to be destroyed; while the post-mortem examination of the bodies seems to have been little better than perfunctory. These and other matters have awaited comment. We have purposely withheld criticism because, as soon as the gravity of the situation appeared, the authorities grappled their task with the greatest energy and enthusiasm. The colony possesses some of the ablest men in Australia for the special work demanded of them in this instance, and no stone has been left unturned to secure the criminals. Under the circumstances it would have been unfair to lash the police and stimulate to wrath a public already righteously indignant. Some valuable information has been withheld from our readers with the object of assisting in the quest; and when the facts are known it will be seen that no good object could have been attained by publishing everything obtained, even if honour and public interests had not kept us silent. But now we get to another murder in which the facts again point to supineness and incredulity on the part of the police, and silence would become criminal. The Gatton murder may still be left for exhaustive comment, since departmental errors may be retrieved, and the criminals concerned brought to justice, though late in the day. With regard to the Oxley tragedy, however, it seems impossible to help the law by silence. Rather will the law be aided by pointing to a case in which the severest condemnation seems due. Here was an anxious parent asking for assistance from the police, and only after importunate appeals was his request granted. Even so, the idea of disappearance as the result of foul play seems to have been treated lightly, although the lad Hill was shown to have no possible motive for leaving his home and seeking work away from Brisbane. As we have already remarked, he left his watch and money behind him. When Mr Hill at last finds his son’s body it is in a part of the environs of the metropolis, where anything like earnest police investigation must have proved successful. And then a civilian has to be thanked for the finding! No doubt the police would have done at Oxley or elsewhere what they are doing with so much ability and vigour at Gatton had they grasped the significance of events earlier in the day. But that is the whole point. It is like shooting a bird long after it has flown, to begin to run down a criminal when clues are stale or broken; and no matter how fine a shot a man may be, he can expect little for his bag or stomach unless he is prepared to fire when the game rises. Should the Ipswich tangle come in here to complicate a horror already dreadful enough, we shall certainly be justified in asking whether the whole police department does not require to be reorganised and given a fresh staff.

MURDER AT OXLEY.
———○———
THE MISSING BOY HILL.
———
A SHOCKING DISCOVERY.
———
A REVOLTING CRIME.
———

    All doubt as to the fate of the unfortunate lad Alfred Stephen Hill, who so mysteriously disappeared on the 10th of last month (an event chronicled on Saturday) has now been removed. The gruesome discovery made by the search party in the vicinity of Oxley on Saturday morning proved that the conclusions arrived at from the facts published in the “Courier” on Saturday morning were unfortunately only too true, for it is now quite clear that the boy was most brutally murdered, and if the theory held by people in the district and by the police be correct, the circumstances connected with the crime are of the most revolting nature.

    According to arrangement, a large search party, including the father, Mr F Hill, and uncle, Mr Herbert Hill, and a brother, Mr Henry Hill, Mr Bridges, MLA, and his son, started out from Nundah at an early hour on Saturday morning, and proceeded to Oxley with the intention of making a thorough search through the paddock in which the carcass of the horse had been discovered the day before. Mr Whiting was engaged by the father to assist in the search, and the party were subsequently joined by a special reporter from the office of this journal. On arriving at Oxley they proceeded to a paddock about a mile from Oxley, and midway between Oxley and Darra, and known as Brown and Walsh’s paddock. The police, under Chief Inspector Stuart, were already there, and they included, in addition to several mounted constables, Sergeant Shanahan (of the Criminal Investigation Branch), Acting Sergeant Small (of Goodna), First-class Constable Henderson (of Oxley), and Constable Auld. They were busily engaged in searching for the boy around the place where the remains of the horse were lying. The Nundah party first carefully examined a spot where it had been supposed that something was buried, but nothing was found, and they then proceeded to search the paddocks, which are rather thickly timbered with wattle. Mr Bridges’s son Thomas, who is a capital bushman, and able, as some of the police admit, to track almost anything in the bush, left the party after a while, and struck across the paddock on his own account, and had not proceeded far when he came across the remains of the boy. The discovery, which was made shortly before 10 o’clock, was at once reported. The boy was found about 250 yards from the carcass of the horse, on the surface of the ground, in a clump of bushes. The body, which was very much decomposed, was covered with bushes. Immediately the boy was found the police, profiting no doubt from their experience at Gatton, formed a guard around the body, and would not let any one approach; but the father, Mr Hill, went up and had a look at it. The body was not uncovered at all. The boots were protruding from under the bushes. On the discovery being made, Chief Inspector Stuart, after seeing everything safe, drove off at once to Brisbane for a doctor.

    During his absence the place in the vicinity of the body was carefully guarded by the police, under Sergeant Shanahan. The “Courier” representative had the opportunity of making a careful examination of the remains, and found that the unfortunate boy had been brutally murdered. The remains, which were supposed at first to be lying face upwards, were very decomposed. A large sapling or bough had been drawn over them by the murderer, and nothing was visible but the boots and the bone of one leg, from which all the flesh had disappeared.

    On looking at the skull through the leaves, a large hole, such as would be caused by a bullet, was discernable in the head just over the left eye. It is supposed that the boy was taken into the paddock, that an unnatural offence was committed, that he was then shot, and that the horse was shot afterwards.

    The name of a man who appears to have gained an unenviable notoriety was freely spoken of at Oxley. The police were on his track, but up to a late hour last night had no trace of him. He left Goodna the same day as the boy left Oxley, and they should have met at about the locality where the body was found. The man stayed at the Oxley Hotel that night, and was last seen in Brisbane.

    An extra pair of the boy’s pants, and a riding whip were lying near the body, and a copy of the “Evening Observer,” dated 31st December, was found some distance away.

A BLOOD-STAINED SHIRT.

    Whilst waiting for the arrival of the Government medical officer, a incident occurred which for the time occasioned some little excitement. Two young men, named Alfred Hughes and Joseph O’Neill, came on the scene with a blood-stained shirt, which they had picked up on the roadside not far from the place where the remains were lying. It appears that they were on their way to Brisbane on horseback when they found the shirt. It was a white flannelette shirt, and there were stains apparently of blood on one of the sleeves. The shirt was very much discoloured, and it appeared probable from the statement of the men that it had been washed up on the roadside. It was taken possession of by Sergeant Shanahan, but the police attach very little importance to it. Hughes, it may be stated, was from Ipswich, and O’Neill from Harrisville.

A GHASTLY SPECTACLE.

    This little incident was no sooner over than another stir was caused by the arrival of the Government undertaker’s conveyance with a rough coffin, for the purpose of conveying the remains to Brisbane. The vehicle, which was a covered-in four-wheeler, was driven into the paddock and up to within a few yards of the spot, and the coffin was taken out and laid a little distance from the remains of the dead boy. By this time there were a great many people present, including three or four women, who stationed themselves on a little rise a short distance away, where they could observe all that was going on. It was about a quarter-past 3 o’clock, when Chief Inspector Stuart returned to the scene with Dr [Charles James Hill] Wray, the Government medical officer, and a photographer. The chief inspector at once ordered the crowd to stand back, and proceeded to have photographs of the remains taken. Several photographs were taken, and then, at the request of the doctor, the police carefully removed the bushes. As soon as the remains were uncovered it was found that the boy was lying on his stomach. The skull was evidently detached, for it was turned partly face upwards, and it was this fact that gave the impression before the boy was uncovered that he was lying on his back. He was, as stated, however, lying on his stomach. The legs were wide apart, so wide, in fact, as to give the impression that they had been pulled apart. Both feet were turned outward. The clothes were intact, and properly adjusted in every particular. The boy was wearing a white shirt, collar, tie, coat, and trousers, the latter being suspended by braces. A minute examination having been made of the body as it now appeared by Sergeant Shanahan, further photographs, and after Dr Wray had made a superficial examination it was lifted by the undertaker’s men bodily into the coffin. As it was lifted by the trousers and coat the skull fell away, and it was picked up by the doctor and placed in the coffin. The boy’s straw hat was found under his right arm. Mr Hill, who was standing by, very much affected, picked up something where the boy had been lying, which he at first though was a bullet, but which turned out only to be a small stone. The coffin was at once nailed down, and conveyed to the waggonette, and a start was made for Brisbane. Several of the police remained at the spot searching for the bullet.

THE POST-MORTEM.

    When the remains reached Brisbane they were conveyed to the morgue at the hospital, and early yesterday morning Dr Wray made a thorough post-mortem examination. On being interviewed by our representative he stated that the boy was shot with either a revolver or pistol, and that the weapon was placed close to the head. The boy was shot from behind, the bullet entering the base of the skull and coming out just over the left eye. The body was so decomposed that it was impossible for the doctor to tell whether an unnatural offence had been committed. There was scarcely any flesh on the body; both hands were gone. On the clothes being searched, a purse containing a watch key and three old nails was found in one of the pockets. As soon as the post-mortem was over, the father was allowed to have the remains, and they were subsequently encoffined by the undertakers, Messrs Cannon and Cripps, and removed to the poor boy’s parents’ home at Nundah.

THE FUNERAL.

    The funeral took place at half-past 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon, and, as may be imagined, created a great deal of agitation at Nundah and at Lutwyche, where the remains were interred. A considerable amount of feeling was displayed, and on every side there were heartfelt expressions of sympathy with the bereaved parents. Mr Hill lives at Sandgate-road, Nundah, and at the time of the funeral a great many people congregated in the vicinity. The coffin was of polished cedar, and there was a silver engraved nameplate on the lid. The cortege moved from the father’s residence for the Lutwyche Cemetery at half-past 4 o’clock. The hearse was followed by upwards of 140 vehicles and sixty horsemen. The chief mourners were Mr and Mrs Hill, and unfortunate boy’s brother, and several relative. The route was lined with friends and sympathisers. The funeral was met at the cemetery gats by the Rev Canon Osborn and a surpliced choir, and the coffin was conveyed to the grave. An impressive service was conducted at the graveside by Canon Osborn, and several hymns were sung. Many of those present were visible affected, and everyone seemed moved by the sadness of the case.

MRS CATCHPOLE’S STATEMENT.

    Mrs Catchpole, a friend of the bereaved family, and the last person, as far as is known at present, who saw the boy before he fell into the hands of the person or persons who so brutally murdered him, was interviewed by our representative on Saturday at Oxley. She lives in a small wooden cottage there, exactly opposite the Oxley Hotel, and facing the main road. The crime was committed about a mile from her house, and almost in sight, so to speak, of the Oxley Hotel. At the time our representative called Mrs Catchpole was busy at her sewing machine. She is an elderly lady, and as soon as she knew the mission of representative was on, frankly consented to tell all she knew. “It’s a terrible thing,” she said. “It’s four weeks to-day since the poor boy was here. I was sitting at the door sewing with the machine just like this, when I saw him come. He got off his horse and hung it up at the fence, and came up the steps. He says, “Does Mrs Catchpole live here?” and I said, “Yes, that’s my name.”

    You didn’t know him, then?

    “No, I didn’t know him at all. He brought a letter for me from my grandson, George Crompton. I said I thought George was coming up to-day, and he said, “No, he is not coming up to-day.” I said, “Where are you from, Zillmere or Geebung?” and he said, “No; I come from Nundah, my name is Hill.” I said, “Oh, is it?” and he said, “Yes, George works for my father.” My grandson is learning the saddlery. In the meantime I opened the letter, and having looked into it I said to him, “Are you going back again.” He said, “No, I am going back either to-morrow or Monday; I am going to Goodna.” I said, “When you go back again tell George his mare and foal will be all right when he comes up at Christmas. He was to come up during the holidays to brand it, but he sent the letter instead.”

    “As far as I can remember,” said Mrs Catchpole, “that is all I said to the child.” He stood at the door a little bit, and then he said, “I’ll be going, Mrs Catchpole,” and I said, “All right, good evening, and he got on his horse and went away up the road there towards Goodna.”

    You didn’t ask him inside?

    “No, I did not.”

    What time did he leave here?

    “Well, it was about 5 o’clock on Saturday evening, 10th December. I never saw him afterwards.”

    Was there anything peculiar about the boy?

    “No, nothing. He looked a nice, quiet boy. He was rather slim.”

AN IPSWICH SENSATION.
———○———
CHARGE OF CORRUPTING YOUTH.
———

    With the news of the discovery of the body of the lad Hill yesterday there came information of a man having spent the night in the vicinity, who answered to the description of one who it was said had disappeared from Ipswich, and in connection with whom certain horrible rumours were afloat.

    A special reporter of this paper was at once despatched to that town to glean all information possible in connection with the matter, and upon arrival a strange state of affairs was found to exist. Among other things, it was noticed that there was a conspiracy of silence in some quarters, which, though it might at present have for its object the assistance of the cause of justice, appears to have had a different origin. A desire to avoid scandal in some quarters possibly may have exerted an influence at the outset, but however that may be, the fact remains that a man against whom most serious and horrible charges are being made, and who until recently occupied the position of a master in a leading scholastic institution of Ipswich, has been allowed to depart from the town, no one knows definitely where, and it is only since the discovery at Oxley that a few meagre details are made available. So far as can be gathered, the history of the man and the case from the beginning is as follows:—

Wilson, convicted of indecent assault and suspected of murdering the lad, Alfred Stephen Hill. Image: <em>The Queenslander</em>, Sat 14 Jan 1899, p. 75. Reproduction: SLQ
Wilson, convicted of indecent assault and
suspected of murdering the lad, Alfred
Stephen Hill. Image: The Queenslander,
Sat 14 Jan 1899, p. 75. Reproduction: SLQ

    Somewhere about July last a second master was wanted for the Ipswich Boys’ Grammar School, and the successful applicant for the position appeared in the person of Mr Edward Liston Carne Wilson, then of Warrnambool, Victoria. Mr Wilson always signed himself MA. When the new master arrived he went to board with a certain family. He had with him a son of about 11 years of age, who was a cripple. From what could be gathered from the remarks of the lad, and one or two remarks dropped by Wilson himself, it appeared that he had a wife living in Sydney, and also a daughter, but his domestic life had been unhappy, and he was living apart from them. There had been another daughter, who had died. Wilson himself was a man of about 45 years of age, of medium build, and he wore a dark moustache and no whisker. He was a man of peculiarly taciturn disposition and stern demeanour, and gave the impression of being possessed of a resolute character. He could scarcely ever be tempted into conversation with adults, but all his austerity vanished in the company of boys. To them he thawed immediately, and would do anything for them. He would take them anywhere or buy them anything, and he frequently treated the lads of the town, whose acquaintance he cultivated, to all manner of boyish luxuries, from ginger beer and cake to cigarettes. After a short residence with the family referred to, Wilson took a small cottage nearer the school, where he removed with his boy to keep house for himself, he said, but after a few weeks he seems to have given up the idea, and he returned to those he originally boarded with. He then informed the lady of the house that he was desirous of securing a few pupils for an evening class, as he thought that this would assist his own studies, besides supplementing his income. The lady had no objection, and allowed him the use of the parlour on the top floor, where he and his pupils would be undisturbed by the family. Wilson was not long in securing the attendance of several of the town boys at his evening classes, and his next step appears to have been to get his own lad out of the house, ostensibly because he had no time to care for him.

    Arrangements were made to have the lad cared for in the home of another person, and the little cripple, seated in an invalid’s cart, drawn by a goat, and accompanied by a little son of the landlady, soon became a familiar spectacle and an object of pity in the streets of Ipswich.

    About two months ago, or a little more, Wilson had his attention attracted to a smart-looking lad of about 14, who resided near to Wilson’s lodgings. Wilson sent a message to this lad to the effect that he wanted to speak to him, and the outcome was that an arrangement was made whereby he was engaged by Wilson ostensibly to run a few messages in his spare time, and go to his room several evenings each week to do some copying, in return for which Wilson was to coach him up for a civil service examination. On his first visit the lad was provided with cakes &c, but was given no exercise to do, a fact which struck the mother as peculiar. On a subsequent visit he was given a shilling and taken into town, where soft drinks were bought, and he was promised a trip to Brisbane to the theatre, returning next morning to Ipswich, provided the mother was willing. This the latter declined to permit. On the next occasion the lad went to Wilson he returned in a state of great excitement, but declined to say more than that “Mr Wilson was a bad, wicked man,” and he would not go near him again upon any consideration.

    The mother, thinking that this was an attempt to evade the lessons imposed by Wilson, tried to prevail upon the boy to go, but he remained obstinate, and would give no explanation of his conduct, merely saying that he had promised solemnly not to tell. About a month later the boy’s mother heard that Wilson was resigning his position at the school, and going away. Her brother, a gentleman in business in Ipswich, then impressed upon her the necessity of trying to force the boy’s secret from him before Wilson left, and the lad at length confessed that Wilson had made improper overtures to him, offering to give him a “lot of money and a silver watch” if he assented. This confession appears to have been elicited on or about 12th December last, and the mother went at once with the intention of charging Wilson with his misconduct, but on arrival there she found he had left on the Saturday previous, the 10th December.

    For some weeks Wilson talked of going to Southport, there to open a preparatory school, at the conclusion of the term at the Ipswich Grammar School. He went to Southport, and returning, informed those he had lived with that he had made arrangements for opening the establishment. During the week preceding the 10th he paid up which he owed at his place of residence. He also sent his luggage to the railway station by a vanman, with instructions to book it for Brisbane in the name of “Betts.” The vanman, not knowing him, was not, of course, suspicious. On the morning of Saturday, the 10th December, he left those he boarded with, giving them to understand that he intended taking the crippled son for a walk. He took the lad in the goat-cart, accompanied by another boy, whose family were also ignorant, like everyone else, of the intended abrupt departure, and they proceeded in the direction of Bundamba. Arrived at the Racecourse Hotel, Wilson took the goat from the cart, and sent the last-named lad back with it and the harness to his home, telling him that he was going to Southport, and that he would send for him to come down there to him, and bring the goat and harness. It is said that Wilson afterwards purchased a bottle of beer at the Racecourse Hotel, and late in the day another bottle at the hotel at Redbank, where he appears to have gone by road. The next trace of him is picked up at Goodna, where he inquired at the hotel how far it was to Corinda, saying that he wanted to take the train from thence to Southport. He appears then to have spent the night at the Oxley Hotel with his boy. A pair of crutches, which had been used by the crippled lad, and the goat and harness, are still in the possession of the families at Ipswich with whom Wilson was intimate. The complaint made by the mother of the boy whom Wilson engaged to attend his classes seems to have caused further inquiry, as an outcome of which a number of the lads who had attended the classes were examined, and to his horror the father of one of the lads found that some of them had fallen victims to the man. The lads were subsequently examined by the police, and it is said that the details elicited were of so revolting a nature that the father of one of the boys, who was present, had to leave the room. This took place on the 13th December, and on the 14th a warrant was issued for Wilson’s arrest.

    The masters of the Ipswich Grammar School are all absent from Ipswich at the present time, and the school is closed for the holidays, so that any information they may be able to throw on the matter is at present unavailable; but, whatever outside influence might have been brought to bear in the case, it is said the [sic] Mr Cameron, the principal, has not attempted to in any way shield Wilson. It is understood, in fact, that the boys attending the Grammar School are not concerned in the matter at all. The parents of the lads too, whom our reporter conversed with, declare that, regrettable as it would be to have their names bandied about, they have not desired to protect the offender to save their names from being published. The police, however, are perfectly dumb on the matter, and advance as an excuse that their confidence has been abused in connection with the Gatton tragedy, and as a consequence their instructions are to say nothing. The opinion of Wilson held by those he resided with may be readily imagined. They spoke earnestly, and expressed a deep hope for the early capture of the man. The gentleman of the house admitted to our reporter that the police had only just left him, and they had sealed his lips. That he could say a lot, he admitted.

    Wilson was well known to many of the prominent citizens of Ipswich, who all seem to have regarded him as a peculiar man.

    A prominent and representative citizen of Ipswich declared that to his knowledge a letter was received in Ipswich on Saturday from Wilson, and this revealed the fact that though hundreds of miles from that town, he was still in Queensland territory. Nothing more would he say on the subject, and as to whether the police were aware of the existence of the letter he did not know. He had no doubt, however, that they could obtain full information regarding it. There are numbers in Ipswich who will see recorded in these statements much that they had already heard by rumour. The question that has at once presented itself, and is asked everywhere, is how the man could have been allowed to depart in the manner he has, and why such a length of time has been allowed to elapse and actually nothing done towards bringing Wilson forward to answer the charges made.

    Other information collected is to the effect that on Sunday, 11th December, at midday, two cyclists were riding out to Oxley, and they met Wilson, wheeling his boy in the cart or perambulator, near Indooroopilly Bridge. The man came on to Brisbane, and, strangely enough, put up at an hotel, where one of the cyclists resided. On reaching home in the afternoon one of them remarked to his father, “Why, that is the man we met near Indooroopilly Bridge.” Wilson stayed at the hotel on Sunday afternoon and night, left on Monday at 1 pm, on foot, wheeling his boy as before. In the afternoon he sent a cab for his luggage. The police are understood to have the name of the cabman, and have interrogated him, but he could remember nothing definite about the business. On leaving the hotel Wilson said he was going to Southport, but on inquiry at Melbourne-street the police found that no such man travelled from there on Monday 12th December. That is the last definite information available, but it is said that there is a warrant out for the arrest of a man for indecent exposure at Murwillumbah. His name is Wilson, and his description corresponds with that of the Ipswich man. When he left here he still had the crippled boy with him. Wilson has exhibited a gold watch, which he said he had bought for £40 at Mr John Bennett’s in Cheapside, when in England in the Jubilee year. He said he could get £60 for it any day now if he were hard up. The watch was one of those with a plain dial and a square opening in the centre, in which the figures representing the time appear.

    Further information again is to the effect that Wilson’s luggage was not booked in the name of “Betts” by the vanman right through to Brisbane, but only as far as Oxley, where he booked it again under a second name to Brisbane.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Mercury, Mon 9 Jan 1899 8

ANOTHER BRUTAL MURDER.
———
A BOY VICTIM.
———

    Another murder, or apparent murder, has startled Queensland.

    The scene of the tragedy is Goodna, about a dozen miles from the capital, and on the same line of railway as leads to the scene of the Gatton outrage.

    On December 10 a lad, named Alfred Stephen Hill, the son of a saddler, left his home at Goodna to pay a visit to a relative. He was mounted on a piebald pony, and since that time the lad had never been seen, despite a most active search by the police, nothing could be discovered till a few days ago, when the pony was found shot in the forehead in some bushy scrub.

    On Saturday the body of the missing boy was discovered beneath some bushes.

    All appearances point to the conclusion that a brutal murder has been committed.

    The police would not allow the public to view the body, which is in an advanced state of decomposition. The spot where the corpse was found is about 100 yards from where the body of the pony was discovered.

    A doctor has been dispatched to the scene to hold a post mortem examination.

    There is no doubt whatever that the boy was murdered, and it is supposed that he was taken into a paddock and most foully treated and then shot dead.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police summary, c. Tue 10 Jan 1899

ELC Wilson — Murder & Sodomy

    Warrant charging him with murder issued by S Brisbane Bench on 4 April 1899 received at CI Branch same day and executed by Const Auld 5 April 1899.

    Warrant charging him with sodomy was not seen by any of the clerks in the CIB office it is gazetted in last year’s Police Gazette page 503. It might have been brought from Ipswich by Act Sergt Fay when he came from Ipswich to escort Wilson from Albany.

    Telegram notifying issue of warrant by Ipswich Bench was received at CI Branch on 15 Dec 1899 through the Chief Inspector; date of issue of warrant would be 14th inst Dec 1898

    Telegrams sent to Southport Nerang & Tallebudgera on 16 Dec 1898
         “         To Toowomba Warwick Stanthorpe & Wallangarra on 16 Dec 1898
         “         To S’port Nerang & Tallebudgera on 19 Dec 1898
         “         To Adelaide 21 Dec 1898
         “         To Sydney Melbourne & Adelaide Wilson suspected of Murder 6 Jany 1899
         “         To Perth & Albany 7 Jany 1899
         “         To Murwillumbah 7 Jany 1899
         “         To Albany 8 Jany 1899

    Letter & crime report to Sydney Melbourne & Adelaide posted on 21 Dec 1898

[signed] JM Holiday Sergt

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, c. Tue 10 Jan 1899

[Hand written note]  Re Wilson suspected of murder a Courier Reporter here making enquires from parents of boys assaulted, he considers Wilson had something to do with Hills murder

99.406. Pol.
Rule 6
From:            Ipswich

Message for:   Chief Inspector Stuart, Brisbane.

    Re Wilson suspected of murder a Reporter from Courier office was in Ipswich today making inquiries from Parents of boys on whom unnatural offences were committed by Wilson and from his inquiries he considers that Wilson had something to do with the murder of Hill if that opinion is published Wilson probably will never be traced

[signed] Edwd Johnson, Sen Sergt.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, c. Tue 10 Jan 1899

From:            Murwillumbah

Message for:    Chief Inspector Police, Brisbane

    Re John Wilson indecent exposure owing to expense arrest not desirable.

[signed] B Kane
Senior Const.

Copies to Depôt & CIB
[initial illegible] 11.1.99

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, c. Tue 10 Jan 1899

99.508 CIB

 

[Hand written notes]

Tweed & Richmond River police wired to do their best to trace John Wilson, Indecent Exposure also to keep sharp lookout for Wilson supposed murder

Supt informed Wilson (murder) arrested. Murwillumbah police advise John Wilson arrest not desirable. [initial illegible] 11.1.99

Replied Wilson, murder, arrested Re John Wilson arrest not desirable. [initial illegible] 11.1.99

From:            Tingha

Message for:    The Commissioner Police, Bne

    I have warned all police in Northern district to keep special smart look out for Wilson suspected murder described in new South Wales police Gazette this year page nine and have wired Tweed and Richmond River police to do best to trace John Wilson wanted Murwillumbah indecent exposure

[signed] Thos Garvin Supt

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Tue 10 Jan 1899 9

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———◦———
A COLD-BLOODED DEED.
———
EVERY EVIDENCE OF
DELIBERATION.
———
HOW THE BODY WAS FOUND.
———

BRISBANE, Monday.

    The chief topic of conversation in the city to-day was the murder of the unfortunate boy, Alfred Stephen Hill, many opinions being expressed as to the probabilities of this dreadful case. The police, both in the metropolis and the Oxley district, are like those at Gatton, leaving no stone unturned to bring the perpetrator of the terrible crime to justice. But, considering that they have allowed him to get nearly four weeks’ start, it is not surprising to find they are now quite at a loss to know what to do, or which way to turn.

    The father of the lad is strong in his condemnation of the authorities for their inactivity in the matter, and states that, in all probability, if he had not himself persisted hunting or tracing his lost boy as he has done the body would not have been discovered up to the present time. It is very surprising, however, that the boy was not discovered before, as for some time past a number of wood-cutters have been felling timber for firewood and for sawmills at Darra, in the immediate vicinity of the crime, and it is surprising that their attention was not attracted to the spot where the rotting carcase of the horse was lying.

    The police were busy all day Sunday at Oxley searching for the bullet. They were on the spot again yesterday, but so far have found absolutely nothing. Young Bridges, who found the body, pointed out to them what appear to be bullet marks on the branches of a sapling in the vicinity. It is understood that the bullet which killed the pony is the same size as that which killed the Murphys’ horse.

    There is no doubt that the man who committed the dreadful deed acted in a cool and deliberate manner. The way in which the corpse had been covered proved that the greatest care had been taken to conceal the body. Some boughs were carefully laid on first, completely hiding the body; then large sapling, stolen evidently from a wood-cutter’s pile, were drawn over the lot. Although the boots were showing on Saturday it must be remembered that the boughs had decayed and that the hands were gone. Iguanas had been eating the remains. There is no doubt that when the murderer left the spot the corpse was absolutely hidden from sight.

    The father of the boy is under the impression that the poor lad was running away when he was shot, but that is doubtful from the position in which the body is found. He could hardly have fallen as found if he was shot when running. He must have been laid out in the position in which he was found after he fell. On this point Dr Wray, the Government medical officer, refuses to give an opinion, but one thing he did admit, and that was that the boy’s hat, which was found under his right arm, had been carefully put there.

    As to the motive for the crime there cannot possibly be any, if the theory of assault which has been set up is discarded. The boy had nothing with him save an old purse with three nails and a watch key in it. The saddle and bridle were left on the horse, a circumstance which led no doubt to the detection of the crime, for, otherwise, Hellman and his son would, no doubt, have passed and taken no notice of the dead horse.

———

ADELAIDE, Monday.

    The police here state, with reference to Wilson, that eight years ago he conducted a school at North Adelaide. He then removed to Broken Hill, and afterwards visited other places in New South Wales before going to Queensland. About four months ago he took his crippled son away from the Lady Bowen Home for Crippled Children, at the Grange, near Adelaide.

———

WARRNAMBOOL, Monday.

    Edward Lytton Carras Wilson, for whose arrest on a serious charge a warrant has been issued in Queensland, is probably identical with a man who was engaged as a teacher in the Warrnambool College about 12 months ago. He was also a lay-reader in the Church of England.

———

BROKEN HILL, Monday.

    When the description of the man Wilson was published to-day in Broken Hill old residents at once noticed the extraordinary manner in which it tallied with that of a former resident on the Barrier. This man was named EC Wilson, who described himself as a Master of Arts, and conducted the Broken Hill Academy up till about three years ago. He as in the habit of wheeling a crippled son in a large go-cart. For some time he acted as lay-reader to the Church of England, but ultimately the incumbent discouraged him from continuing. He was married, but his wife left Broken Hill before he did. It is not known where he went after he left Broken Hill, but a well-known Barrier resident saw him and his crippled son in Melbourne between December 24 and the New Year.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Tue 10 Jan 1899 10

The Brisbane Courier.
————


    Mixed weather generally may be anticipated, says Mr Anderson, of the Chief Weather Bureau. Rain in various places, especially east of a line joining Burketown, Richmond, Alice River, and Mitchell, but very capricious in character.

    It is now stated that the present whereabouts of the man Wilson, for whom a warrant was issued at Ipswich on the 14th December, have become known to the police, and his arrest is almost certain.

THE OXLEY MYSTERY.
———•———
THE POLICE AT WORK.
———
FURTHER PARTICULARS.
———

    The chief topic of conversation in the city yesterday, was, of course, the murder of the unfortunate boy, Alfred Stephen Hill, and many opinions are being expressed as to the probabilities of the dreadful case. The police, both in the metropolis and in the Oxley district, are, like those at Gatton, leaving no stone unturned to, if possible, bring the perpetrator of this terrible crime to justice, but considering that they have allowed him to get nearly four weeks’ start on them, it is not surprising to find that they are now “quite at sea,” so to speak, and at a loss to know what to do, or which way to turn. The father of the lad, Mr Hill, is strong in his condemnation of the authorities for their inactivity in this matter, and states—as far as we can see justly so, too—that in all probability, if he had not himself persisted in hunting or tracing the poor lost boy as he has done, the body, as far as the police are concerned, would not have been discovered up to the present time.

    It is very surprising, however, that the boy was not discovered before, as for some time past a number of wood-cutters have been felling timber for the firewood sawmills at Darra, in the immediate vicinity of the crime, and it is surprising that their attention was not attracted to the spot where the rotting carcase of the horse was lying, as the effluvia must at one time have been strong enough to have reached the main road; and, as is well known now, the remains of the poor boy were not very far from the horse. Our representative was told on Saturday also that a police officer at Oxley had made a search of the neighbourhood, and had, in fact, passed within twenty or thirty yards of the spot. It is well known by those present on Saturday, however, that the stench was even then very powerful. The mystery has, so far as the fate of the boy is concerned, been cleared up by the body being found, as already stated, not by the police, but by a civilian.

    The police were busy all day Sunday at Oxley searching for the fatal bullet, and were on the spot again yesterday, but so far as we have been able to learn had found absolutely nothing. Young Bridges, who found the body, has pointed out to them what appear to be bullet marks on branches of saplings in the vicinity. It is understood that the bullet which killed the pony is the same size as that which killed Murphy’s horse.

    Some are inclined to think that the mere fact of the lad’s clothing being properly adjusted when found tends to disprove the theory that any unnatural offence had been committed; but that, on being examined in the light of other circumstances, goes for little. There is no doubt that the man who committed the dreadful deed acted in a cool and deliberate manner. The way in which the corpse had been covered proved that. A more carefully covered corpse perhaps has never been traced in the bush. Small boughs were carefully laid on first, completely hiding the crime, and then a large sapling, “sneaked,” as some one said, from the wood-cutter’s pile, was drawn over the lot. Although the boots were showing on Saturday, it must be remembered that the boughs had decayed, and that the hands were gone—the iguanas had been at the remains. There is no doubt that when the murderer left the spot the corpse was absolutely hidden from sight, and if he acted in this cool, deliberate way, is it not probable—particularly if he was a man addicted to committing such offences—that he would, in order to prevent any chance of the crime being traced to him, see that the clothes were properly adjusted?

    The father of the boy, Mr Hill, is under the impression that the poor lad was running away when shot, but that is doubtful from the position in which the body was found. He could hardly have fallen as found, our representative thinks. If he was shot when running he must have been laid out in the position in which he was found after he fell. On this point Dr Wray, the Government medical officer, refuses to give an opinion, but one thing he did admit to our representative on Sunday, and that was the boy’s hat, which was found under his right arm, had been carefully put there.

    As to the motive for the crime, there cannot possibly be any, if we discard the theory which has been set up. It seems to be the only feasible one. The boy had nothing with him save an old purse with three nails and a watch-key in it. The saddle and bridle were left on the horse—a circumstance which by-the-bye led no doubt to the detection of the crime, otherwise Mr Hellman and his son would no doubt have passed and taken no notice of the dead horse.

THE IPSWICH SENSATION.
———○———
PROBABLE ARREST OF WILSON.
———
THE “CONSPIRACY OF SILENCE.”
———

    It was rumoured in Brisbane last evening that the man Wilson, for whose arrest on certain charges a warrant was issued in Ipswich on 14th December last, had been taken. Inquiries from official sources yielded no satisfactory confirmation of the statement; but we have reason to believe that his whereabouts, at all events, has become known to the police, and that his arrest is now almost certain.

———
AN ARREST AT BOROREN.

    In this connection may be given the telegrams received last night from our Bundaberg and Rockhampton correspondents, though the name of the man arrested in this case was given as Lee, and so far as our messages go there appears to be nothing to identify him with Wilson:—

Bundaberg, January 9.

    The constable stationed at Miriam Vale arrested a man to-day at the Bororen Railway Station whom the police had been shadowing for several days past. He was dressed as a swagman, but the police believe this was a disguise. When the man was arrested some cartridges were found in his swag, which fitted a revolver which had been found hidden under a tank. The man afterwards admitted that the revolver was his. Upon being removed, he asked the police to take precautions and see that he was not mobbed. The man gave the name of Lee.

Rockhampton, January 9.

    Inspector Meldrum is in receipt of information that Constable PJ Linnane, who is temporarily in charge at Miriam Vale station, has arrested at Bororen, thirty-six miles from Gladstone, a man giving the name of Lee, on suspicion of his being a man who is wanted in connection with the Oxley murder. He had a swag; also a six-chambered revolver and a number of cartridges. The weapon had five chambers loaded, and the other one had been discharged. Lee will be taken to Gladstone to-morrow.

———

    Our Ipswich correspondent writes:—Your reporter who visited Ipswich on Saturday last, to inquire into what may be termed the Wilson scandal, mentions that it was noticed that a “conspiracy of silence” existed in certain quarters. Such a statement may lead to a wrong impression being formed. I have made very careful inquiries, and I cannot find that there has been any conspiracy of silence, except that the rumours which have been afloat, and which have been well known to the Ipswich Press, were not made public, at special request of the police authorities, because it was thought that their publication would hamper the officers of the law in making an arrest. Wilson was appointed to the staff of the Boys’ Grammar School in July last. He voluntarily resigned a few days before the breaking-up of the school. He left Ipswich on Saturday, 10th December. At the time nothing against him of any serious character whatever was known. On the following Tuesday evening the parent of a lad who had been receiving private tuition from Wilson heard something which led him to think that a horrible offence had been committed by Wilson. He gave information to the police on the same night, and I believe that on the following morning a warrant was issued for Wilson’s arrest. Wilson had by that time passed through Brisbane. I am positively assured that, although they are in an unenviable position, the parents of the lads who it is alleged have been tampered with have in no way attempted to hush the matter up, and have offered to give the representatives of the law what assistance they can in the matter. The trustees of the Grammar School have made no attempt whatever, either as a body or individually, to interfere with the course of justice. I hear, also, that since the warrant was issued the local police have done whatever they could to trace the missing man, and succeeded in tracing him beyond Goodna. What people here are asking is how it has come about that the police authorities in Brisbane have not been able to trace Wilson’s movements since he left the metropolis. It is felt here that they certainly are most to blame in the matter. I should like to make it perfectly clear that none of the lads concerned are Ipswich Grammar School pupils. They are all boys who were receiving private instruction from Wilson, and who went to the house where he was staying for that purpose. Mr Wilson came here from Warrnambool College, Victoria, and presented excellent testimonials before he was appointed to the school staff. One of his recommendations bore the name of Chief Justice Way, of South Australia. He was also highly recommended by Mr Scott, principal of Warrnambool College, from which he had just come. It is only fair that it should generally be known that it was several days after Wilson left Ipswich that anything came out about the charges now alleged against him, and that since the matter was put into the hands of the police here they have been unremitting in their attempts to secure traces of him. (It should be pointed out that almost every fact given above was included in our special reporter’s account of the affair.—Ed.)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Tue 10 Jan 1899 11

A HORRIBLE QUEENSLAND
CRIME.
———◦———
OUTRAGE AND MURDER.
———
POSSIBLE ARREST AT ALBANY.
———

Brisbane, January 8.

    With reference to the disappearance of the lad Hill, a search party was sent out yesterday, from Nundah. The police were actively engaged in searching for traces in the vicinity of the remains of the pony. The party proceeded to search the paddocks thickly timbered with wattle, and discovered the body of the boy murdered, 400 yards from the body of the pony. The lad’s body was seen lying in some bushes about 800 yards on the Ipswich road. The police informed the relatives of the missing boy, and they recognised the remains of the lad and a whip, as well as a pair of trousers, which had been rolled up and attached to the lad’s saddle when he left home.

    On the evening of December 10th, about two hours after the lad Hill was last seen alive, a man, supposed to be from Ipswich, went to Oxley Hotel and had tea. He had wit him a boy whom he was wheeling in an invalid’s cart. The manner of the man was excited and uneasy, so much so, that a servant girl became quite alarmed. In answer to the landlady, the man said he came from Redbank, but the invalid lad said, “No father, from Ipswich.” He told the boy to hold his tongue. It has since been ascertained that the man and boy were seen to leave the train at Riverview. The man spent the night of December 10 at the Oxley Hotel, and it is said he has since been seen in Brisbane.

    Hill was 15½ years old. He was very confiding and of a quiet nature, and rather timid.

    Careful examination of the remains leaves no doubt whatsoever that the unfortunate boy was murdered. The remains were lying face upwards. And were very decomposed. A large sapling was drawn over them and there was nothing visible but the boots and the bone of one leg, from which all the flesh had disappeared. A large hole in the top of the skull had apparently been caused by a bullet fired at close quarters.

    It is supposed that the boy had been taken into the paddock, an outrage committed, and then shot. The horse was evidently killed afterwards.

    The police are on the track of the man suspected. If he left Goodna on the same night as the boy left Oxley, they should have met about the locality where the body was found. From the position of the bullet hole, it would seem that the boy was shot while lying down. The remains of the lad were removed to Brisbane this evening.

Broken Hill, January 9.

    The telegraphed description of the man who is suspected to have murdered the boy Hill in Queensland tallies in an extraordinary manner with that of an old Barrier resident, EC Wilson, who described himself as a Master of Arts. He kept a school, and was in the habit of wheeling his crippled son in an invalid’s chair. A Barrier resident saw him in Melbourne a short time back.

Melbourne, January 9.

    The police to-day received the intimation that a warrant has been issued for the arrest of Wilson, a Queensland man, who had been in Melbourne, but had left for London in the Blue Anchor [line] steamer, Yarrawonga. The steamer cleared out on the 27th, and it is proved beyond a doubt that Wilson was on the boat, accompanied by a crippled boy. According to telegrams the man and boy were still on the ship when she cleared out for Adelaide. The detectives believe the steamer is likely to call at Albany. If so the police of that town will be instructed to arrest Wilson and detain him until an officer of the Queensland police force arrives to secure his extradition.

Adelaide, January 9.

    Eight years ago Wilson kept a school at North Adelaide. He then went to Broken Hill, leaving his crippled son at Lady Brown’s Home for Crippled Children at the Grange. He only took him away four months ago. It is alleged, on good authority, that a warrant was out against him in Queensland for committing unnatural offences on boys in his school, and previous to the issue of the warrant for murder. One of the reasons why he is suspected of the latest crime is that the murdered boy Hill stated that he had been criminally assaulted prior to his life being taken. When Wilson left the Barrier he wandered all over New South Wales previous to settling in Queensland.

    It is stated that the police have reasons to connect the Gatton and Oxley tragedies, in spite of their arrest of a man on suspicion of having caused the former.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Wed 11 Jan 1899 12

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———◦———
ARREST OF WILSON AT ALBANY.
———

Albany, Tuesday.

    At the police court this morning Edward Leighton Cairns Wilson was charged with an assault in Queensland on October 20 last on a boy named Henry Bates.

    Sergeant Stokes asked for a remand for seven days, which was granted.

    Wilson was arrested on the arrival of the steamer Yarrawonga, from Melbourne, last night, on an information that a warrant was issued from Ipswich, Queensland. Wilson is about 50 years of age, and a master of arts, Oxford. He is a good linguist, and was teaching in a school at Adelaide. He is accompanied by a boy about 11 years of age, who is paralysed in his legs, and is supposed to be his son.

———
WILSON'S HISTORY.
———

Adelaide, Tuesday.

    Further particulars have been gleaned of Wilson, the man whose name has been so prominently brought before the public in connection with the Oxley murder. In 1887 a man who called himself the Rev E Carris Wilson, MA, arrived at Adelaide with his wife, child, and nurse from England. He produced credentials from bishops and deans, and exhibited an MA degree. He seemed to have plenty of money, and spent it freely. During March, 1890, he purchased the lease, furniture, and goodwill of the Black Bull Hotel, [Hindley Street, Adelaide], but the venture was not a success. During 1891 he was engaged at North Adelaide in scholastic duties. His wife died, and he left for Broken Hill. It is believed that he married again in Victoria.

———

Numurkah, Tuesday.

    It is believed that Wilson, for whom a warrant has been issued in Queensland, is identical with an individual who resided in Numurkah about two years ago. In response to an advertisement in the Melbourne papers, Wilson arrived here in August, 1896, under engagement to Mr C Chamberlin, of the Globe Hotel, as tutor to the family. His credentials were of the very highest order, and he had special recommendations from the then Governor of South Australia (the Earl of Kintore), Chief Justice Way, and other well known people in South Australia. During his stay in Numurkah Wilson conducted himself well, and amongst other duties, he undertook the work of lay reading in connection with the Numurkah Church of England. He gave every satisfaction to his employer, and his only reason for leaving the place was that the terms of his engagement expired in December, 1896. Before coming to Numurkah Wilson, who gave his name as EC Wilson, said that he had resided in Broken Hill, and that he had a crippled son and a daughter dependent upon him. He invariably represented himself to be a recent arrival at the colonies, but on one occasion he was met by a lady who knew him in the Terrick Terricks district in years previously.

———

Brisbane, Tuesday.

    There are absolutely no fresh developments in connection with the murder of the boy Hill to-day. The police are actively engaged searching the locality, but with no success.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Wed 11 Jan 1899 13

The Brisbane Courier.
———○———

    More rain is likely over the Cape York Peninsular and in many places east from a line joining Burketown, Richmond, Charleville, and Bollon, under strong winds, with some thunderstorms.

    The man Wilson, for whose arrest a warrant was issued in Ipswich some time ago, has been arrested in Albany, Western Australia, on the charge of committing an unnatural offence.

THE IPSWICH SENSATION.
——○——
WILSON ARRESTED AT ALBANY.
———
(By Telegraph from Our Special Reporter.)
———

Gatton, January 10.

    Information has been received that Wilson, for whose arrest a warrant was issued at Ipswich, has been arrested at Albany, Western Australia, and two constables have gone from Brisbane to bring him back. The police, however, do not connect him with the Oxley tragedy on the present information.

————————
DETAILS OF WILSON’S CAREER.
———
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondent.)
———

Albany, January 10.

    When the steamer Yarrawonga arrived from Adelaide late last night she was boarded by three police officers, who arrested Edward Wilson on a provisional warrant from Brisbane, charging him an offence committed in October last. Wilson was brought before the Resident Magistrate and remanded for seven days. The accused made no statement, either when arrested or before the court. He had with him a lad about 10 years of age, who is a cripple, and the lad has, also been detained here.

    Wilson was arrested on a warrant issued in Ipswich, Queensland, charging him with committing an unnatural offence on the 20th October on a boy named Henry Bates. The information states that Wilson is also suspected of murder.

Adelaide, January 10.

    Some further particulars have been gleaned with regard to Wilson, whose name has been so prominently brought before the public. It appears that in 1887a man who called himself the Rev E Carns Wilson, MA, arrived in Adelaide with his wife and child and a nurse from England. He produced credentials from Bishops and deans, and exhibited his MA degree. He seemed to have plenty of money, and spent it freely. During March, 1890, he purchased the lease, furniture, and goodwill of the Black Bull Hotel, but the venture did not prove successful. During 1891, while he was engaged in scholastic duties, his wife died, and he left for Broken Hill. It is believed that he married again in Victoria. From the descriptions telegraphed, many residents are certain that the men are one and the same person.

Sydney, January 11.

    A telegram from Broken Hill states that a man who is supposed to be identical with Wilson, while a resident of the Barrier, was regarded as a shy man, and was passionately fond of his two children, a crippled boy especially. He came to Broken Hill at the end of 1893, and introduced himself to the Rev Mr Wheeler as wishing to assist in work in the Church of England, and he occasionally assisted in mission work. About three months later Mr Wheeler became acquainted with certain matters through the visit of a clergyman from Melbourne, and Wilson’s zeal on behalf of Church work was thereupon discouraged.

Melbourne, January 10.

    Wilson, who has been arrested at Albany, is believed to be identical with EC Wilson, who was in Numurkah under engagement as tutor to Mr C Chamberlain, of the Globe Hotel. He had credentials from Lord Kintore, Governor of South Australia, Chief Justice Way, and others, and he undertook work as a lay reader in connection with the Church of England. Wilson conducted himself well, and left on the expiry of his engagement in 1896. He stated that he had resided at Broken Hill, and that he had a crippled son and a daughter dependent on him. He represented himself as a recent arrival in the colonies, but on one occasion he was recognised by a lady who had known him in the Terricks Terricks district sixteen years previously.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Mercury, Wed 11 Jan 1899 14

INTERCOLONIAL TELEGRAMS
————————————
By Submarine Cable—Copyright
———
(Tasmanian Press Association.)
———

VICTORIA.

Melbourne, Tuesday.


    A man named Wilson, who is wanted in connection with the murder of the boy Hill at Oxley, Queensland, is supposed to be identical with a school teach of that name who held teaching positions in Adelaide, Broken Hill, Ipswich, Queensland, and other places.

QUEENSLAND.

Brisbane, Tuesday.

    No further development in connection with the murder of the lad Alfred Hill, but a warrant is out for arrest of a man named Edward Lytton Caras Wilson on suspicion of being concerned in the outrage.

    It is believed Wilson left Melbourne by mail steamer, and may be intercepted at Albany.

    News has been received that the Bundaberg police have arrested near that town a man dressed as a swagman, whom they had been shadowing for several days. It is believed that the man is disguised. A number of cartridges were found in his possession which fitted a revolver which was subsequently found under a tank. The man afterwards admitted the revolver was his and gave his name as Lee.

    When arrested he asked the police to take precautions so he might not be robbed.

WEST AUSTRALIAN.

Perth, Tuesday.

    At Albany Police Court, Edward Wilson, charged with grievously assaulting at Queensland, on October 20 last, a boy named Henry Bates, was remanded for a week. Wilson was arrested on arrival of the steamer Yarrawonga from Melbourne last night on information that a warrant had been issued at Ipswich, Queensland. Wilson is about 50 years of age, and a Master of Arts, Oxford. The information says he is suspected of murder. He is accompanied by an invalid boy supposed to be his son.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Wed 11 Jan 1899 5

QUEENSLAND TRAGEDIES.
———◦———
ARRIVAL OF THE YARRAWONGA
AT ALBANY.
———
ARREST OF WILSON.
———

    In the telegrams appearing in yesterday’s WEST AUSTRALIAN it was stated that the Queensland police had taken out a warrant for the arrest of man named EC Wilson, who was suspected of the outrage and murder of the boy Hill at Oxley. Wilson appears to have followed the calling of a schoolmaster in several of the Eastern colonies, and it is stated that a warrant was out against him in Queensland upon the charge of unnatural practices with boys in his school. On the evening of the 10th of last month, about two hours after the lad Hill was last seen alive, a man, supposed to have come from Ipswich, or else to belong to that place, went to the Oxley Hotel and had tea. He had with him a boy, whom he was wheeling in an invalid’s cart. The manner of the man was excited and uneasy, so much so that a servant girl became quite alarmed. In answer to the landlady, the man said he came from Redbank, but the invalid lad said, “No, father, from Ipswich.” He told the boy to hold his tongue. It was subsequently ascertained that the man and boy were seen to leave the train at Riverview. The man spent the night of December 10 at the Oxley Hotel, and it is said he was afterwards seen in Brisbane. The description of the man was telegraphed about the country, and from Broken Hill came the announcement that the description tallied in an extraordinary manner with that of an old Barrier resident named EC Wilson, who used to keep a school, and was in the habit of wheeling his crippled son in an invalid’s chair. Later on it was learned that Wilson had been in Melbourne and had left for London [sic] in the Yarrawonga, one of the Blue Anchor line of steamers, on the 27th of last month. The police authorities at each port the Yarrawonga would touch were communicated with, and at Albany the police were in readiness to arrest Wilson on a provisional warrant issued in Brisbane, charging him with committing an unnatural offence upon a boy on the 25th of October, last year.

    Our Albany correspondent, telegraphing yesterday, states that the Yarrawonga reached Albany at a quarter to nine on Monday night. Upon its arrival, the steamer was boarded by Sergeant Stokes, Detective Renfrey, and Constable Lynch. From inquiries made, they ascertained that a passenger named Edward Wilson, having with him a crippled boy, about 10 years of age, supposed to be his son, was on the steamer. Thereupon, the police officers arrested Wilson on the provisional warrant, and conveyed him to the station.

    Yesterday morning he was brought before Mr JA Wright, RM, in the Police Court, and upon the application of Sergeant Stokes remanded back into custody. There he will remain until the arrival of a constable from Brisbane, with the original warrant.

    Neither when he was arrested nor when placed in the dock did Wilson make any statement. On the contrary, he preserved strict silence about his movements. The lad who is supposed to be his son has also been detained, but he is not in custody.

    One of the reasons why he is suspected of the Oxley murder is that, prior to his life being taken, Hill stated that he had been criminally assaulted. How long before the murder this statement was made is not mentioned in the telegrams, but the appearance of the murdered lad when found on the Ipswich-road indicated the perpetration of an outrage of the kind, followed by his death from a bullet, fired into his skull apparently at close quarters.

Adelaide, January 10.

    Wilson, while in Adelaide some years ago, took a lease of the Black Bull Hotel in Hindley-street. Before his wife died accused went to the Barrier and opened a school there as previously stated.

    Wilson’s stay at Broken Hill was chiefly remarkable for the fact, it is stated, that during it his first wife went to Adelaide, and shortly after Wilson spread the story that his wife was dead, and that he was left with two young children on his hands. He was helped financially by the people of Broken Hill, and then it leaked out that his wife was not dead. The man had assisted in the Church of England work, until the clergyman became acquainted with a part of his past life. When Wilson was told that he was not wanted he became insolent, and wrote several impudently denunciating letters to the minister.

Melbourne, January 10.

    It is believed that Wilson, who has been arrested at Albany, resided in Numurkah during August, 1896, under an engagement to Mr C Chamberlain, of the Globe Hotel, as tutor to his family. His credentials were of the very highest. He had special recommendations from the then Governor of South Australia (the Earl of Kintore), Chief Justice Way and other well-known people of that colony. His conduct seemed immaculate while in Numurkah. He mentioned that he had been a resident of the Barrier.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Thu 12 Jan 1899 16

THE “QUEENSLANDER.”

    The later horrors that have shocked the community since the Gatton tragedy became known are the subject of several illustrations in the “Queenslander” this week. A view is given of the spot at Oxley where the body of poor young Hill was discovered, as well as a portrait of the victim as he stood outside his father’s shop at Nundah in his working-dress. A portrait is also given of Wilson, who is concerned in the Ipswich sensation, and another of Burgess, who was arrested at Dalby a few days ago, and whose movements are being inquired into by the police.

ARREST OF WILSON.
———○———
FURTHER PARTICULARS.
———
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondent.)
———

Adelaide, January 11.

    Further particulars with reference to the man Wilson, who was arrested at Albany on a warrant from Ipswich, show he came from a well-known good family in Westmoreland, and had letters of introduction from some of the best people in England, letters such as people of great influence only could have obtained.

————————

    Our Ipswich correspondent writes:—General satisfaction has been expressed here at news of the arrest, at Albany, of the man Wilson, who is wanted on a charge of having committed a criminal offence. Acting Sergeant Fay left here by the mail train this morning to escort Wilson back to Queensland, taking with him a warrant for Wilson’s arrest. The business man in Ipswich who received a letter from Wilson on Saturday last was Mr GJ Hudson, chemist, of Brisbane-street. Shortly before leaving here Hudson secured a verdict against Wilson for £2 15s, the debt having been contracted for a battery for the crippled boy. Enclosed in the letter received on Saturday was the receipt for this amount (but no money), and the summons that had been served upon Wilson. The latter had on the back of it an impertinent message. A third enclosure was a few lines of poetry in a humorous but not very dignified strain. The letter was dated from Melbourne, but had been posted in the travelling post office, South Australia, on 4th instant. Although the authorities here do not venture an opinion on the subject, it is thought that the receipt of this letter here (it was handed over to the police) may have furnished an important clue leading to Wilson’s arrest.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 14 Jan 1899 17

AN IPSWICH SENSATION.
CHARGE OF CORRUPTING YOUTHS.

    With the news of the discovery of the body of the lad Hill on Saturday there came information of a man having spent the night in the vicinity, who answered to the description of one who it was said had disappeared from Ipswich, and in connection with whom certain horrible rumours were afloat.

    A special reporter of this paper was at once despatched to that town to glean all information possible in connection with the matter, and upon arrival a strange state of affairs was found to exist. Among other things, it was noticed that there was a conspiracy of silence in some quarters, which, though it might at present have for its object the assistance of the cause of justice, appears to have had a different origin. A desire to avoid scandal in some quarters possibly may have exerted an influence at the outset, but however that may be, the fact remains that a man against whom most serious and horrible charges are being made, and who until recently occupied a position of a master in a leading scholastic institution of Ipswich, has been allowed to depart from the town, no one knows definitely where, and it is only since the discovery at Oxley that a few meagre details are made available. So far as can be gathered, the history of the man and the case from the beginning is as follows:—

    Somewhere about July last a second master was wanted for the Ipswich Boys’ Grammar School, and the successful applicant for the position appeared in the person of Mr Edward Liston Carns Wilson, then of Warrnambool, Victoria. Mr Wilson always signed himself MA. When the new master arrived he went to board with a certain family. He had with him a son of about 11 years of age, who was a cripple. From what could be gathered from the remarks of the lad, and one or two remarks dropped by Wilson himself, it appeared that he had a wife living in Sydney, and also a daughter, but his domestic life had been unhappy, and he was living apart from them. There had been another daughter, who had died. Wilson himself was a man of about 45 years of age, of medium build, and he wore a dark moustache and no whisker. He was a man of a peculiarly taciturn disposition and stern demeanour, and gave the impression of being possessed of a resolute character. He could scarcely ever be tempted into conversation with adults, but all his austerity vanished in the company of boys. To them he thawed immediately, and would do anything for them. He would take them anywhere or buy them anything, and he frequently treated the lads of the town, whose acquaintance he cultivated, to all manner of boyish luxuries, from gingerbeer and cake to cigarettes. After a short residence with the family referred to, Wilson took a small cottage nearer the school, where he removed with his boy to keep house for himself, he said, but after a few weeks he seems to have given up the idea, and he returned to those he originally boarded with. He then informed the lady of the house that he was desirous of securing a few pupils for an evening class, as he thought that this would assist his own studies, besides supplementing his income. The lady had no objections, and allowed him the use of the parlour on the top floor, where he and his pupils would be undisturbed by the family. Wilson was not long in securing the attendance of several of the town boys at his evening classes, and his next step appears to have been to get his own lad out of the house, ostensibly because he had no time to care for him.

    Arrangements were made to have the lad cared for in the home of another person, and the little cripple, seated in an invalid’s cart, drawn by a goat, and accompanied by a little son of the landlady, soon became a familiar spectacle and an object of pity in the streets of Ipswich.

    About two months ago, or a little more, Wilson had his attention attracted to a smart-looking lad of about 14, who resided near to Wilson’s lodgings. Wilson sent a message to this lade to the effect that he wanted to speak to him, and the outcome was that an arrangement was made whereby he was engaged by Wilson ostensibly to run a few messages in his spare time, and go to his room several evenings each week to do some copying, in return for which Wilson was to coach him up for a civil service examination. On his first visit the lad was provided with cakes, &c, but was given no exercise to do, a fact which struck the mother as peculiar. On a subsequent visit he was given a shilling and taken into town, where soft drinks were bought, and he was promised a trip to Brisbane to the theatre, returning next morning to Ipswich, provided the mother was willing. This the latter declined to permit. On the next time the lad went to Wilson he returned in a state of great excitement, but declined to say more than that “Mr Wilson was a bad, wicked man,” and he would not go near him again upon any consideration.

    The mother, tinking that this was an attempt to evade the lessons imposed by Wilson, tried to prevail upon the boy to go, but he remained obstinate, and would give no explanation of his conduct, merely saying that he had promised solemnly not to tell. About a month later, the boy’s mother heard that Wilson was resigning his position at the school, and going away.

    Her brother, a gentleman in business in Ipswich, then impressed upon her the necessity of trying to force the boy’s secret from him before Wilson left, and the lad at length confessed that Wilson had made improper overtures to him, offering to give him a “lot of money and a silver watch” if he assented. This confession appears to have been elicited on or about 12th December last, and the mother went at once with the intention of charging Wilson with his misconduct, but on arrival there she found he had left on the Saturday previous, the 10th December.

    For some weeks Wilson talked of going to Southport, there to open a preparatory school, at the conclusion of the term at the Ipswich Grammar School. He went to Southport, and returning, informed those he had lived with that he had made arrangements for opening the establishment. During the week preceding the 10th he paid up what ho owed at his place of residence. He also sent his luggage to the railway station by a vanman, with instructions to book it for Brisbane in the name of “Betts.” The vanman, not knowing him, was not, of course, suspicious. On the morning of Saturday , the 10th December, he left those he boarded with, giving them to understand that he intended taking the crippled son for a walk. He took the lad in the goat-cart, accompanied by another boy, whose family were also ignorant, like everyone else, of the intended abrupt departure, and they proceeded in the direction of Bundamba. Arrived at the Racecourse Hotel, Wilson took the goat from the cart, and sent the last-named lad back with it and the harness to his home, telling him that he was going to Southport, and that he would send for him to come down there to him, and bring the goat and harness. It is said that Wilson afterwards purchased a bottle of beer at the Racecourse Hotel, and late in the day another bottle at the hotel at Redbank, where he appears to have gone by road. The next trace of him is picked up at Goodna, where he inquired at the hotel how far it was to Carinda, saying that he wanted to take the train from there to Southport. The appears then to have spent the night at the Oxley Hotel with his boy. A pair of crutches, which had been used by the crippled lad, and the goat and harness, are still in the possession of the families at Ipswich with whom Wilson was intimate. The complaint made by the mother of the boy whom Wilson engaged to attend his classes seems to have caused further inquiry, as an outcome of which a number of the lads who had attended the classes were examined, and to his horror the father of one of the lads found that some of them had fallen victims to the man. The lads were subsequently examined by the police, and it is said that the details elicited were of so revolting a nature that the father of one of the boys, who was present, had to leave the room. This took place on the 13th December, and on the 14th a warrant was issued for Wilson’s arrest.

    The masters of the Ipswich Grammar School are all absent from Ipswich at the present time, and the school is closed for the holidays, so that any information they may be able to throw on the matter is at present unavailable; but whatever outside influence might have been brought to bear in the case, it is said the [sic] Mr Cameron, the principal, has not attempted to in any way shield Wilson. It is understood, in fact, that the boys attending the Grammar School are not concerned in the matter at all. The parents of the lads too, whom our reporter conversed with, declare that, regrettable as it would be to have their names bandied about, they have not desired to protect the offender to save their names from being published. the police, however, are perfectly dumb on the matter, and advance as an excuse that their confidence has been abused in connection with the Gatton tragedy, and as a consequence their instructions are to say nothing. The opinion of Wilson held by those he resided with may be readily imagined. They spoke earnestly, and expressed a deep hope for the early capture of the man. The gentleman of the house admitted to our reporter that the police had just left him, and they had sealed his lips. That he could say a lot, he admitted.

    Wilson was well known to many of the prominent citizens of Ipswich, who all seem to have regarded him as a peculiar man.

    A prominent and representative citizen of Ipswich declared that to his knowledge a letter was received in Ipswich on Saturday from Wilson, and this revealed the fact that though hundreds of miles from that town, he was still in Queensland territory. Nothing more would he say on the subject, and as to whether the police were aware of the existence of the letter he did not know. He had not doubt, however, that they could obtain full information regarding it. There are numbers in Ipswich who will see recorded in these statements much that they had already heard by rumour. The question that has at once presented itself, and is asked everywhere, is how the man could have been allowed to depart in the manner he has, and why such a length of time has been allowed to elapse and actually nothing done towards bringing Wilson forward to answer the charges made.

    Other information collected is to the effect that on Sunday, 11th December, at midday, two cyclists were riding to Oxley, and they met Wilson, wheeling his boy in the cart or perambulator, near Indooroopilly Bridge. He had previously called at a house in Chelmer to ask the way to Brisbane, and was directed over the Indooroopilly Railway Bridge. The man came on to Brisbane, and, strangely enough, put up at a hotel where one of the cyclists resided. On reaching home in the afternoon one of them remarked to his father, “Why, that is tm we met near Indooroopilly Bridge.” Wilson stayed at the hotel on Sunday afternoon and night, and left on Monday at 1pm on foot, wheeling his boy as before. In the afternoon he sent a cab for his luggage. The police are understood to have the name of the cabman, and have interrogated him, but he could remember nothing definite about the business. On leaving the hotel Wilson said he was going to Southport, but on inquiry in Melbourne-street the police found that no such man travelled from there on Monday, 12th December. That is the last definite information available, but it is said that there is a warrant out for the arrest of a man for indecent exposure at Murwillumbah. His name is Wilson, and his description corresponds with that of the Ipswich man. When he left here he still had the crippled boy with him. Wilson has exhibited a gold watch, which he said he had bought for £40 at Mr John Bennett’s, in Cheapside, when in England in the jubilee year. He said he could get £60 for it any day now if he were hard up. The watch was one of those with a plain dial and a square opening in the centre, in which the figures representing the time appear.

    Further information again is to the effect that Wilson’s luggage was not booked in the name of “Betts” by the vanman right through to Brisbane, but only as far as Oxley, where he booked it again under a second name to Brisbane.

A MYSTERIOUS MURDER.
A BOY AND HIS HORSE SHOT.
———
A SHOCKING DISCOVERY.
———
A REVOLTING CRIME.

    The metropolitan as well as the provincial police have had their hands pretty full in their endeavours to unravel one of the greatest outrages that has been recorded in the Australian annals of crime for some years past; but from facts which came to our knowledge on Friday evening, it would appear that they are now face to face with another horrible crime just as mysterious as the terrible Gatton tragedy. Our readers will probably remember reading the following advertisement which appeared about Christmas time:—“Public notice. Lost in bush, between Oxley and Ipswich, last seen near Goodna, a boy, 16 years of age, dressed fawn serge pants, gray coat, and black straw hat; was riding a piebald pony branded J7H. Anyone knowing whereabouts communicate station-master, Goodna, or Fred Hill, Nundah.”

The boy, Alfred Stephen Hill, centre, in front of his father’s saddlery at Nundah. Image: <em>The Queenslander</em>, Sat 14 Jan 1899, p. 75. Reproduction: SLQ
The boy, Alfred Stephen Hill, centre, in front of his father’s saddlery
at Nundah. Image: The Queenslander, Sat 14 Jan 1899, p. 75.
Reproduction: SLQ

    The boy’s father, who carries on business at Nundah as a saddler, states that his son left his home shortly after 2 o’clock on Saturday afternoon, 10th December, riding a piebald pony, and with the intention of going to his aunt’s at Redbank Plains. He was also to deliver a letter to a Mrs Catchpole, who was a friend of the family, and resided at Oxley. It appears that he reached Oxley that evening, delivered the letter, and went on his way in the direction of Redbank Plains. The boy was never seen again. He was to have returned home on the following Monday; but his parents, when they found he did not, consoled themselves with the thought that he had prolonged his stay at his aunt’s residence. As he did not arrive home on Tuesday, however, his father drove over to Redbank Plains, and to his amazement discovered that the boy had never reached there. That night the father came on to Brisbane, and on Wednesday reported the matter at the Criminal Investigation Branch, but was advised to advertise it in the “Police Gazette,” which, by the way, was not to appear until a week later. He was naturally exceedingly anxious, and not at all satisfied with this advice, and, subsequently meeting a detective whom he knew, succeeded in getting inquiries instituted. No trace, however, could be found of the missing boy. Sergeant Small, at Goodna, who was communicated with, considered it probable that the boy had gone away somewhere on his own account. The father, however, held a different opinion, as the boy had never shown any disposition to leave his home, for which, it appears, he had a great love. In fact, the little pocket money he had, together with his watch, he left under his pillow when he departed, a circumstance which points unmistakeably to the conclusion that he intended to return. The search was continued, but without avail until Thursday, when a discovery was made which left little doubt of foul play.

    It appears, from information we have obtained from a reliable source, that on Thursday a man and a boy went out into the bush from Indooroopilly to look for gum for tanning purposes when the boy found the dead carcass of the horse which was ridden by the missing lad, about a mile beyond Oxley, on the way to Goodna, to which place, as already pointed out, he was going. Very little notice would probably have been taken of the horse but for the fact that it still had on the saddle and bridle. It was lying about a quarter of a mile off the Goodna road, and in a thick patch of scrub. The man and boy took off the saddle and bridle and conveyed them to the sergeant at Indooroopilly, and reported the discovery. The father of the missing lad was communicated with, and on Friday morning went with Mr Bridges, MLA, a mounted constable, and the sergeant from Goodna, to the place where the horse was lying. Mr Hill at once identified the horse, and on the animal being examined it was found that it had been shot through the forehead. The hair around the wound was singed, indicating thereby that the weapon used was fired at a very close range. The vicinity was then searched, and the remains of a fire were found a few chains from the horse, and also portions of what appeared to be burnt flesh. The horse’s head was taken possession of by the constable, and was placed in the stable at the police depot at Petrie-terrace. The pieces of burnt flesh were also secured, and have been submitted to examination by experts; but up to the present they have been unable to tell whether it is human flesh or not. It is surmised the horse was led into the place where it was found and then shot.

    All doubt as to the fate of the unfortunate lad was removed on Saturday morning, and it is now quite clear that the boy was most brutally murdered, and if the theory held by people in the district and by the police be correct, the circumstances connected with the crime are of the most revolting nature.

    According to arrangement, a large search party, including the father, Mr F Hill, an uncle, Mr Herbert Hill, and a brother, Mr Henry Hill, Mr Bridges, MLA, and his son, started out from Nundah at an early hour on Saturday morning, and proceeded to Oxley with the intention of making a thorough search through the paddock in which the carcass of the horse had been discovered the day before. Mr Whiting was engaged by the father to assist in the search, and the party were subsequently joined by a special reporter from the office of this journal. On arriving at Oxley they proceeded to a paddock about a mile from Oxley, and midway between Oxley and Darra, and known as Brown and Walsh’s paddock.

The place where the lad, Alfred Stephen Hill’s body was found. Image: <em>The Queenslander</em>, Sat 14 Jan 1899, p. 75. Reproduction: SLQ
The place where the lad, Alfred Stephen Hill’s body was found.
Image: The Queenslander, Sat 14 Jan 1899, p. 75. Reproduction: SLQ

    Mr Bridge’s son Thomas, who is a capital bushman, and able, as sone of the police admit, to track almost anything in the bush, left the party after a while, and struck across the paddock on his own account, and had not proceeded far when he came across the remains of the boy. The discovery, which was made shortly before 10 o’clock, was at once reported. The boy was found about 250 yards from the carcass of the horse, on the surface of the ground, in a clump of bushes. Immediately the boy was found the police, profiting no doubt by their experience at Gatton, formed a guard around the body, and would not let anyone approach; but the father, Mr Hill, went up and had a look at it. The body was not uncovered at all. The remains, which were supposed at first to be lying face upwards, were very decomposed. A large sapling or bough had been drawn over them by the murderer, and nothing was visible but the boots and the bone of one leg, from which all the flesh had disappeared.

    The name of a man who appears to have gained an unenviable notoriety was freely spoken of at Oxley. He left Goodna the same day as the boy left Oxley, and they should have met at about the locality where the body was found. The man stayed at the Oxley Hotel that night, and was last seen in Brisbane.

    An extra pair of the boy’s pants and a riding whip were lying near the body, and a copy of the “Evening Observer,” dated 31st December, was found some distance away. As soon as the remains were uncovered it was found that the boy was lying on his stomach. The skull was evidently detached, for it was turned partly face upwards, and it was this fact that gave the impression before the boy was uncovered that he was lying on his back. He was, as stated, however, lying on his stomach. The legs were wide apart, so wide, in fact, as to give the impression that they had been pulled apart. Both feet were turned outward. The clothes were intact, and properly adjusted in every particular. The boy was wearing a white shirt, collar, tie, coat and trousers, the latter being suspended by braces. A minute examination having been made of the body as it now appeared by Sergeant Shanahan, further photographs were taken, and after Dr Wray the accused made a superficial examination, the body was placed in a coffin, and taken to the Brisbane morgue, where a post-mortem examination was made by Dr Wray, who stated that the boy was shot with either a revolver or pistol, and that the weapon was placed close to the head. The boy was shot from behind, the bullet entering the base of the skull and coming out just over the left eye. The body was so decomposed that it was impossible for the doctor to tell whether an unnatural offence had been committed. There was scarcely any flesh on the body; both hands were gone. On the clothes being searched, a purse containing a watch-key and three old nails were found in one of the pockets. As soon as the post-mortem was over, the father was allowed to have the remains, and they were subsequently encoffined by the undertakers, Messrs Cannon and Cripps, and removed to the poor boy’s parents’ home at Nundah.

    The funeral took place at half-past 4 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, and, as may be imagined, created a great deal of agitation at Nundah and at Lutwyche, where the remains were interred. A considerable amount of feeling was displayed, and on every side there were heartfelt expressions of sympathy with the bereaved parents.

MRS CATCHPOLE'S STATEMENT.

    Mrs Catchpole, a friend of the bereaved family, and the last person, as far as is known at present, who saw the boy before he fell into the hands of the person or persons who so brutally murdered him, was interviewed by our representative on Saturday at Oxley. She lives in a small wooden cottage there, exactly opposite the Oxley Hotel, and facing the main road. The crime was committed about a mile from her house, and almost in sight, so to speak, of the Oxley Hotel. At the time our representative called Mrs Catchpole was busy at her sewing machine. She is an elderly lady, and as soon as she knew the mission our representative was on, frankly consented to tell all she knew. “It’s a terrible thing,” she said. “It’s four weeks to-day since the poor boy was here. I was sitting at the door sewing with the machine just like this, when I saw him come. He got off his horse and hung it up at the fence, and came up the steps. He says ‘Does Mrs Catchpole live here?’ and I said, ‘Yes, that’s my name.’”

    You didn’t know him, then?

    “No, I didn’t know him at all. He brought a letter for me from my grandson, George Crompton. I said I thought George was coming up to-day, and he said, ‘No, he is not coming up to-day.’ I said, ‘Where are you from, Zillmere or Geebung?’ and he said, ‘No; I come from Nundah, name is Hill.’ I said, ‘Oh, is it?’ and he said, ‘Yes, George works for my father.’ My grandson is learning the saddlery. In the meantime I opened the letter, and having looked into it I said to him, ‘Are you going back again.’ He said, ‘No, I am going back either to-morrow or Monday; I am going to Goodna.’ I said, ‘When you go back again tell George his mare and foal will be all right when he comes up at Christmas. He was to come up during the holidays to brand it, but he sent the letter instead.’

    “As far as I can remember,” said Mrs Catchpole, “that is all I said to the child. He stood at the door a little bit, and then he said, ‘I’ll be going, Mrs Catchpole,’ and I said, ‘All right; good evening,’ and he got on his horse and went away up the road there towards Goodna.”

    You didn’t ask him inside?

    “No, I did not.”

    What time did he leave here?

    “Well, it was about 5 o’clock on Saturday evening 10th December. I never saw him afterwards.”

    Was there anything peculiar about the boy?

    “No, nothing. He looked a nice, quiet boy. He was rather slim.”

    As far as we could learn from headquarters, there have been no fresh developments in connection with the Oxley tragedy. The Chief Inspector, on being seen by a representative of this journal, stated that he had no information whatever to give. We understand that Sergeant Shanahan and several of the police are continuing the search at Oxley for the missing bullet and any evidence which may tend to sheet home the crime.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Tue 17 Jan 1899 18

The Brisbane Courier.
———○———


    Three Queensland police have left Melbourne for Albany in connection with the arrest of the man Wilson.

VICTORIA
———◦———
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondent.)
———
MELBOURNE, January 16.
———
ARREST OF WILSON.

    Three members of the Queensland Police Force left for Albany this afternoon in connection with the arrest there of the man Wilson on a warrant from Ipswich.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Wed 18 Jan 1899 19

THE QUEENSLAND TRAGEDIES.
———◦———
THE OXLEY MURDER.
———

Albany, January 17.

    Edward Wilson, whose name has been mentioned in connection with the Oxley murder, was brought up at the police court this morning and further remanded on a charge of committing an unnatural offence on a boy at Ipswich, Queensland.

    Sergeant Stokes has received a telegram stating that three Brisbane constables left Adelaide yesterday by the steamer Gabo, to escort Wilson back to Brisbane.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Thu 19 Jan 1899 20

WESTERN AUSTRALIA.
———

Perth, Wednesday.

    The Minister of Lands estimates the value of all the soil products of the colony, including fruit, for the past year at £1,000,000.

    At the City Police Court to-day, the case against Charles Peart, who was arrested for extradition to Tasmania, again came on for hearing. The magistrate found that, as the local provisional warrant had been issued at a time antecedent to the date of the original warrant issued in Tasmania, the provisional warrant was informal, and the prisoner was therefore discharged.

    It is proposed to institute telegraphic communications between Rottnest Island and Fremantle, a distance of 14 miles, by the wireless system.

———
THE ACCUSED MAN WILSON.
———
A FURTHER REMAND.
———

Albany, Wednesday.

    LEC Wilson, who is charged with committing a serious offence at Ipswich, Queensland, was brought up this morning at the police court on remand.

    Sergeant Stokes asked for a further remand of seven days. He stated that three members of the Queensland police had left Adelaide yesterday in the steamer Gabo for the purpose of taking the accused to Brisbane.

    The Bench granted the remand.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Mercury, Thu 19 Jan 1899 21

INTERCOLONIAL TELEGRAMS
————————————
By Submarine Cable—Copyright
———
(Tasmanian Press Association.)
———

WEST AUSTRALIA.

Albany, Wednesday.

    LEC Wilson, who was charged with committing a serious offence at Ipswich, Queensland, was brought up this morning at the Police Court, on remand. Sergeant Stokes asked for a further remand of seven days. He stated that three members of the Queensland police had left Adelaide yesterday in the steamer Gabo for the purpose of taking accused to Brisbane. The Bench granted the remand.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Tue 24 Jan 1899 22

WESTERN AUSTRALIA.
———

Albany, Monday.

    At the Police Court this morning, C Wilson appeared upon remand charged with having committed a serious offence at Ipswich, Queensland. Acting-Sergeant Fay, stationed at Ipswich, Queensland, produced the original warrant for the arrest of Wilson, and identified the accused as the person named in the warrant. Wilson was then remanded to Queensland, in custody of the police. He was removed to the police station, pending the steamer leaving for the eastern colonies.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Tue 24 Jan 1899 3

THE OXLEY AFFAIR.
————

Albany, January 23.

    Edward Wilson was again brought before the Court this morning, and remanded to the custody of the Queensland police. Sergeant Fay, of Ipswich, produced the original warrant, and identified the accused as Wilson. The crippled boy, who is supposed to be a son of Wilson’s was also brought forward and remanded. The charges were laid in camera. It is understood that the boy is merely charged so as to secure his attendance as a witness in the case against his father.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Tue 31 Jan 1899 24

THE QUEENSLAND TRAGEDIES.
———◦———

Albany, January 30.

    The two Queensland constables left for Brisbane to-day, in the steamer Gabo, having in their charge Wilson, whose name has been mention in connection with the Oxley tragedy, and his crippled son.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Wed 8 Feb 1899 25

NEWS IN BRIEF.
———◦———

    Edward Lytton [or Liton] Carns Wilson, the man who was arrested at Albany for a serious offence at Ipswich, Queensland, reached Melbourne yesterday by the steamer Gabo. Wilson, it will be remembered, was arrested in Albany, and kept in gaol until a Queensland detective arrived to secure his extradition. He will be escorted to Brisbane on the steamer Peregrine, which leaves to-day, and with him will be taken to the Queensland authorities several reports regarding the man which have been collected by Superintendent Brown, of the Melbourne detective office.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Wed 8 Feb 1899 26

VICTORIA.
———○———
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondence.)
———
MELBOURNE, February 7.
———

THE IPSWICH SENSATION.

    The man Wilson, who was arrested at Albany in connection with an alleged offence at Ipswich, arrived here to-day by the steamer Gabo.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Sat 11 Feb 1899 27

The Brisbane Courier.
———○———


    Generally fine weather is anticipated in Queensland, except for scattered showers, followed by local disturbances and more rain of a showery nature.

    Wilson, the man who was arrested at Albany in connection with certain alleged offences at Ipswich, is being brought to Brisbane by the steamer Peregrine.

NEW SOUTH WALES.
———○———
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondence.)
———
STDNEY, February 10.
———
THE IPSWICH SENSATION.

    It was expected that ELC Wilson, who was recently arrested at Albany in connection with certain alleged offences at Ipswich, would have been on board the steamer Gabo, which arrived from Melbourne to-day. It was found, however, that the man and the officers accompanying him had been transhipped on to the steamer Peregrine, owing to the fact that the latter vessel will leave for Brisbane tomorrow afternoon.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Mon 13 Feb 1899 28

The Brisbane Courier.
———○———


    Fine weather, with patches of cloud, was general in Queensland yesterday morning. Last evening a shower fell in Brisbane, but the sky cleared immediately afterwards.

    The man Wilson, who was arrested at Albany in connection with certain alleged offences at Ipswich, left Sydney for Brisbane on Saturday by the steamer Peregrine.

NEW SOUTH WALES.
———○———
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondent.)
———
SYDNEY, February 11.
———
THE IPSWICH CASE.

    The man ELC Wilson, who was arrested at Albany, charged with an offence alleged to have been committed at Ipswich, left Sydney this afternoon by the steamer Peregrine. He is in good health, and, considering the nature of the offence with which he is charged, his spirits are fairly good. His crippled son is also on the steamer.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police telegram, Tue 14 Feb 1899

Rule 6
From:            Ipswich

Message for:    Chief Inspector of Police Brisbane.

    [Telegram partly in code] Re case of Wilson By dorgese to tqmdomeq against ftgnak bduhinfqxm says ygif nq tqmdp aboz oagdt please instruct

[signed] Denis Shanahan Sergt

    [Hand written notes]   PM refuses to hear case against the boy privately says must be heard in open Court.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Tue 14 Feb 1899 29

THE CHARGE AGAINST
A SCHOOLMASTER.

    ELC Wilson, who was arrested at Albany on warrant, charging him with a capital offence committed at Ipswich, arrived to-day by the steamer Peregrine. A large crowd assembled at the wharf, and the police had difficulty in forcing a way through with the prisoner, who was driven away amid the hooting and yelling of the crowd.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Tue 14 Feb 1899 30

CRIMINAL REFORM.


    The man, EL Cairns Wilson, who was arrested at Albany some time back for alleged offences at Ipswich, arrived yesterday from the South by the steamer Peregrine. A large crowd assembled on Messrs WH Smith and Sons’ wharf, Petrie’s Bight, to catch a glimpse of Wilson as he landed. The prisoner was escorted from the steamer to the cab, by Sergeant Shanahan and Detective Auld, and, although quite a number of police were in attendance, it was only with the greatest difficulty that Wilson was taken through the throng to the cab. Wilson, who was dressed in a dark suit, seemed dejected, and hung his head to avoid the gaze of the crowd.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Tue 14 Feb 1899 31

THE IPSWICH OUTRAGE.
———◦———

Brisbane, February 13.

    The man ELC Wilson, who was arrested at Albany (WA) for an alleged criminal offence, committed at Ipswich, arrived to-day by the steamer Peregrine. A large crowd assembled at the wharf, and the police had difficulty in forcing their way through with the prisoner, who was driven away amid the hooting and yelling of the crowd.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Wed 15 Feb 1899 32

WILSON BEFORE THE COURT.
——○——
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondent.)
———

Ipswich, February 14.

    EL Cairns Wilson and his crippled son arrived here by train from Brisbane about 2 pm to-day. Everything was kept very quiet and there was no demonstration.

Later.

    Wilson was brought up at the Police Court this afternoon, before the Police Magistrate. Acting Sergeant Fay have formal evidence of having escorted the prisoner from Albany to Ipswich, and Sergeant Johnson then asked for a remand for eight days, for the production of further evidence. The remand was granted, and the prisoner was removed. The prisoner looked very dejected.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Wed 15 Feb 1899 33

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———◦———

Brisbane, February 14.

    EC Wilson, who arrived yesterday from Albany, charged with a criminal offence alleged to have been committed at Ipswich, was brought up at the Ipswich Police Court to-day, and remanded for a week.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Thu 16 Feb 1899 334

THE OXLEY MURDER.

    It is understood that a magisterial inquiry into the circumstances of the death of the lad Hill, the victim of the Oxley tragedy on the 10th December, will be opened at an early date. The man Wilson, who was arrested at Albany, and conveyed to Brisbane charged with offences said to have been committed at Ipswich, and who passed through Oxley on the day of young Hill’s murder, will probably be called as a witness. Richard Burgess, who is said to have been at Oxley on the day of the crime there, will most likely be also examined.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Northern Territory Times and Gazette, Fri 17 Feb 1899 35

LATEST TELEGMRAS. [sic]
———
(From Our Own Correspondent)
———
(By Telegram.)
———


    In reference to the Oxley tragedy, the man Wilson, who was arrested at Albany, has arrived at Ipswich in custody. When the prisoner arrived at Brisbane there was an immense crowd on the wharf, and the excitement amongst them was intense.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Advertiser, Sat 18 Feb 1899 36

THE OXLEY TRAGEDY.
———◦———
THE INQUEST.
———
IMPORTANT EVIDENCE BY
WILSON’S SON.
———
CONTRADICTS HIS FATHER.

Brisbane, February 17.

    The magisterial enquiry into the death of the boy Hill, who was found murdered near Oxley, was held at the Police Court, South Brisbane, to-day before Messrs Harris and Austin, justices. The utmost secrecy was observed, the only persons present being the police, the press, and the lad Hill’s father.

    Dr Wray deposed to making an examination of the body, and finding a bullet wound, showing that the shot was fired from behind, and that the bullet emerged from the front of the head.

    The deceased’s father also gave evidence of identification of the remains.

    Edward Carus Wilson, who was guarded by three constables, was then placed in the witness-box. He deposed that up to December 9 he was a teacher at the Ipswich Grammar School. He left the following day with his cripple boy in a cart for Brisbane. He then described all his movements along the road, and denied that he carried a revolver. He also denied that he left the lad on the road while he went into the bush for any length of time, but afterwards admitted that he left the lad a few minutes near Oxley while he went to enquire the distance to Oxley. After the depositions were read over to him he corrected this statement by saying that it was at Corinda that he left the lad for the purpose of getting a drink of water. He denied having seen a boy on a piebald pony.

    Claud [sic] Wilson, son of the last witness, an intelligent lad, was then sworn. He said he was 11 years of age in December last. He corroborated his father’s statements as to his movements until they reached Oxley. He said his father called a each hotel on the road and had a glass of beer.

    Continuing his evidence, the lad Wilson said:—“Before coming to Oxley we met a boy riding a piebald horse, then we met a swagman, then a lady and gentleman in a cart. The boy passed us walking up a hill. He met us close to the place where the road branches off. Then my father turned round and wheeled me back a few yards towards Ipswich, and went into the bush. When my father left me in the road and went into the bush he went in the direction of Ipswich. He left me in the cart at the side of the road on the right hand side looking towards Ipswich. My father did not turn the cart round, but just left it standing as it was. When my father started taking me towards Ipswich I asked him where he was going. He said he was going into the bush and would be back soon. My father left me on the road, and went into the bush at a place where the fence was broken down. I could only see him for a short distance, and then the trees were in the way, and I lost sight of him. I remained there some time, and I heard the report of a revolver. Some time after my father returned. He came out of the trees a little higher up towards Ipswich than where my cart was standing. He said he had shot a hawk and asked me if I was all right. I said, ‘Yes.’ I then asked ‘Where have you been?’ He replied, ‘I have just shot a hawk in the bush.’ My father said that he had hit the hawk in the wing. He asked me if I thought he had been away a long time. He did not tell me any more about the hawk, but asked me not to say anything at all about it. My father then wheeled me to the road. The swagman we met came from the road on the right hand side of the Ipswich-road, looking towards Brisbane. When we met him my father spoke to him, but I could not hear what he said, because they were talking in a low tone. They only spoke together for a short time. After they ceased talking we came on, my father dragging my cart. After that he went on to the Oxley Hotel. When we arrived my father had some ale, and then we both had our tea. After tea father sent me to bed in a room, the door of which opens into the road at one end of the hotel. There were two beds in the room. The beds being small ones I slept alone that night, and did not see my father going to bed at all. I was awakened in the morning by my father. We had breakfast, and then left the hotel, my father again dragging my cart. We came on to Brisbane. At Brisbane we went to the Exchange Hotel at first, but afterwards we went to the Metropolitan Hotel, where we stayed that night. Next morning my father took his shirt away to be washed. He told me about this afterwards, and also said ‘I have sold my revolver at the nearest shop to the hotel.’ He did not tell me which shop. I know what a revolver is. The first time I saw a revolver was when my father showed me one. He showed me his revolver at Ipswich, and taught me how to load it. The day before my father left Ipswich, I saw only five cartridges in the box. My father took the revolver from his black trunk before proceeding to teach me how to load it. At that time it was in a leather case. When we were leaving Ipswich that morning I did not see my father put anything in his pocket, coming along the road. My father had other clothes than those he was previously wearing.” The witness, who had throughout given most intelligent answers, was then carried out of court.

    Sergeant Shanahan—At this stage I would ask your worship to adjourn the case.

    The Bench—This enquiry stands adjourned sine die.

Brisbane, February 17, 11.40 pm.

    The enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of the boy Hill was kept exceedingly secret by the police, so as not to pander to the sensational tastes of the people. Consequently only the persons immediately concerned were present. Even the press was not directly informed until a very short time before the opening of the enquiry. The evidence of Dr Wray, who was the first witness, did not take very long. The principal feature of it was the production of the skull of the unfortunate boy, which the medical officer carried in a small box covered with a kind of cloth. When the gruesome exhibition was exposed the condition of Hill’s father, who was present, was most pitiable. He appeared as if he would give way several times. Everybody was glad when the skull was removed, as the smell was very unpleasant. Most interest centred around Wilson, but his evidence was given without much incident. The crippled son several times showed signs of collapse, but he was shown the greatest consideration. The public generally were unaware that the inquest was being held till the evening papers were issued.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Sat 18 Feb 1899 37

THE OXLEY TRAGEDY.
———◦———
INQUEST ON THE BOY HILL.
———
CARUS [sic] WILSON GIVES EVIDENCE.
———
THE CRIPPLED BOY'S STORY.
———

Brisbane, Friday.

    The inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of the boy Alfred Stephen Hill, murdered at Oxley on the 10th December last, was held to-day at the South Brisbane Police Court. Only the officials, press representatives, and other directly interested were present. The examination was conducted by Sergeant Shanahan, the commissioner of police and the father of the lad being also in attendance.

    Dr Wray, the Government medical officer, was the first witness. He stated that on 8th January he held a post-mortem examination on the body at the Hospital morgue, and found a bullet wound in the skull. The body was very much decomposed. His opinion was that the shot was fired from behind, and that the bullet passed right through the head, there being evidence of the entrance and exit of the bullet.

    Frederick John Hill, the father of the deceased, described how he found the body.

WILSON'S STATEMENT.

    The next witness was Edward Litton Carus Wilson. When the police brought him in they were about to place him in the dock, but were sternly told to place him in the witness-box. He said he was a teacher, recently employed at the Ipswich Grammar School. He had been in Queensland since last July. He was employed at Ipswich till 9th December, and left it on Saturday morning, December 10, at about 11 o’clock. He left alone, but met his boy, Claude Wilson, and a boy who was minding his goat, named Guy Betts, met them on the Bundamba-road. All walked on towards Brisbane, not quite towards Bundamba township. Guy Betts went to get fruit cakes at a shop. Witness and his son walked until he came back. Witness then unharnessed the goat from the cart, and gave it to Guy Betts to lead back to Ipswich. Witness led the cart through Bundamba, with his son in it. He meant to take the train a portion of the way, but met Mr Makepeace, whom he knew, and asked for a lift in his cart. Mr Makepeace gave them a lift as far as Redbank railway crossing.

    At this point Wilson asked that two boys at the window facing him might be sent away, which was done.

    Wilson (continuing) said he took the cart with the boy from Makepeace’s cart and drew it after him towards Goodna. He rested at the Royal Mail Hotel for half an hour, and then came on in the direction of Brisbane. He was still drawing the cart with his son in it. After leaving Goodna he went in the direction of Oxley, where he intended to stay the night. He went right on to the Oxley Hotel, though he had trouble in finding the place. It was after sundown when he arrived at the hotel. He ordered tea and a bedroom, and had tea there. Before coming to the Oxley Hotel he met a man who was riding what appeared to be a dark horse, but the light was very imperfect. He asked the man how far it was to Oxley, and understood the man to say either three or four miles. He fancied the man had a beard and a long coat, but did not take particular notice. He believed he met a swagman, but was not certain. He thought the man asked him what was the matter with the child, and that he told him, and, further he gave the man 6d. He believed it was near where he met the horseman, but was not sure, because he did not take much notice. But he believed it was not far from where he met him. He met no other person, not that he recollected. He did not meet a boy riding a piebald pony 38 on the Goodna side of the Oxley Hotel. He did not either meet a boy riding a skewbald pony. 39 He did not at any time turn the perambulator back round and wheel the boy back in the direction of Ipswich. He did not go off the road into the bush. He did not leave the boy about a mile on the Ipswich side of the Oxley Hotel and go away into the bush. He did not at any time go into the bush on his way. He had no occasion to do so.

    Wilson.—Perhaps you will allow me to explain where I did leave the boy.

    Sergeant Shanahan.—Yes.

    Wilson said he left the boy on the outskirts of Oxley. He went to a house to ask his way to the Oxley Hotel. It was about five minutes’ walk from the Oxley Hotel, on the Goodna side. He did not have a revolver at Ipswich. He did not put a revolver in his pocket at Ipswich when coming away; he had not one to put in. He had no sort of firearms; never during the last 13 or 14 years had he a revolver, pistol, or other small firearm. He did not fire a shot at any place between Ipswich and Oxley on the 10th December. He did not tell anyone he shot a hawk on the wing in the bush between those places. He never spoke to anyone about such a thing. After coming from Ipswich he did not tell anyone he had sold a revolver in Brisbane. He stayed at the Oxley Hotel on Saturday night, 10th December, and had tea there. He occupied a room on the ground floor, opening out on the road. Witness got up first in the morning on Sunday, 11th December, and walked up and down in front of the hotel while his boy was dressing. After breakfast, he drew the boy in the cart towards Corinda, the landlord directing him. They crossed Indooroopilly-bridge, and on arrival in Brisbane went to the Metropolitan Hotel, where they stayed till Monday, the 12th December. On the Monday he did not tell anyone he had a revolver in Brisbane. He left that day for Melbourne in the steamer Rockton.

    After the evidence was read over Wilson said, “I should like to say where I left my son. It was at Corinda. He may have thought it was somewhere else. There were a few bushes about. He may have thought I went into the bush. I went into the Corinda railway station to get a drink. I left him just off the man road. The cart was propped up on a stump. I was away about 10 or 15 minutes, not more.”

    Wilson was then removed from the court.

HIS SON'S EVIDENCE.

    His crippled son was then carried in and placed on a chair. He said his name was Claude Wilson, and his age 11 years. He had been living at Ipswich with his father. He came away in his cart drawn by his father. It was drawn by a goat to Bundamba. Guy Betts was with him. They met Wilson at Limestone Hill, and came on towards Brisbane. They met Makepeace, who gave them a lift as far as Redbank. There were two hotels on the way. His father had ale at both of these places. This was before meeting Makepeace. When they came to Redbank crossing they got out of Makepeace’s cart and came towards Brisbane. Makepeace went away. Witness was placed in his little cart, his father dragging the cart after him as far as the next hotel. His father went into the hotel, where he saw him asking for some ale. On leaving there, they went on to Goodna, his father still dragging the cart. Mrs Coleman kept the hotel at Goodna. They did not stop long. His father took him into the hotel, where the former again had ale. When they left they moved on to Oxley. His father dragged the cart, except at the hills, when he pushed it up. On the way to the Oxley Hotel they met a boy riding a piebald horse, then a swagman, and a lady and gentleman in a cart in that order. They noticed there was a sewing machine in the cart. The boy, he thought, was older than witness. The pony was red and white. The animal was going at a walking pace uphill. When they met it was not far from where another road branches off. His father was wheeling him back a few yards towards Ipswich. Then he went into the bush. As he was being wheeled back he could see the piebald pony just by the fence, which surrounds a hollow, with some stones. His father, when he went into the bush went towards Ipswich. Witness was left on the left-hand side of the road. His father went into the bush on the same side, witness facing towards Oxley. His father had pushed the cart back up the hill, and left it in that way. When his father commenced to push him back in the same direction in which the boy with the pony was going, witness asked his father where he was going. He answered, “Into the bush, but I will be back soon.” The fence was broken down a bit where his father went through the opening. He turned round to look where his father was going, but could only see him for a short distance. Then he lost sight of him, as there were some trees. He wasted some time. He heard the report of a revolver. He then waited some time, and his father came back. He had gone in the bush in the direction of Ipswich. He said he had shot a hawk. His father, when he arrived, first asked him if he was all right, and witness told him “Yes.” Witness asked where he had been, and he said he had shot a hawk in the bush, and hit it in the wing. His father asked him if he thought he had been a long time. With regard to the hawk, his father also said he must not say anything about it. His father then wheeled him on to Oxley. A swagman they met came out of the road on the right hand side of the Ipswich-road, going to Brisbane. His father talked to the swagman, but witness could not hear what was said, as they spoke in low tones. They were only talking a short while. Then witness and his father came on. Nothing occurred till they got to the Oxley Hotel, other than that they met a lady and gentleman in a cart, and that his father called at a house on the left hand going to Ipswich. He did not stay long. Witness heard him speaking to some one whom he thought was a man. It was just dusk. His father then drew the cart to the Oxley Hotel, where his father had some ale. Then they had tea. After tea his father put him into bed in a room with a door opening outside on to the road at the end of the hotel. There were two beds in the room. The beds were small. Witness slept alone. The did not see his father going to bed. Witness was asleep and did not see his father getting up the following morning. His father woke him. They had breakfast, and came away in the same style as before. They came towards Brisbane, and passed Corinda station. That was the only place he remembered. When he came to the station his father went in and asked if there was any train to Southport. The witness was left on the grass outside, the cart resting on the stump of a tree. His father came back, and witness asked if there was any train to Southport. He said no, and that he could walk to Brisbane; it was only seven miles more. They crossed the river by the bridge. It was five miles from Brisbane. On arrival in Brisbane they went to the Exchange Hotel, and then to the Metropolitan Hotel, where they stayed the night. Next morning his father took his shirt away to be washed. He told him he had taken the shirt to be washed, and he had sold a revolver at the nearest shop to the hotel. Witness knew what a revolver was. His father showed him one. He first saw it at Ipswich. He also showed him how to load it. A piece of iron had to be pulled back. He showed a round piece with holes. Into this the cartridges were put. When his father was teaching him to load the revolver he took it from a black trunk. It was in a leather case. When they were leaving Betts’s he did not see his father put the leather case in his pocket, nor did he see it on the way. His father on leaving Ipswich had a parcel of clothes, which witness held in the cart. The time he saw the cartridges was the day before he left Ipswich, when he went up to the house where his father was staying.

    The inquiry was adjourned sine die, at the request of Sergeant Shanahan.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Sat 18 Feb 1899 40

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———○———
AN INQUIRY HELD.
———
ELC WILSON EXAMINED.
———
EVIDENCE OF WILSON'S SON.
———
SOME SENSATIONAL TESTIMONY.
———

    The inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of the boy Alfred Stephen Hill, who was murdered at Oxley on 10th December last, was held yesterday at the South Brisbane Police Court. Only the officials, Press representatives, and others directly interested were present. The examination was conducted by Sergeant Shanahan. The Commissioner of Police and the father of the lad were also in attendance. The bench was occupied by Messrs Harris and T Austin, JJP.

    Dr Wray, Government Medical Officer, gave evidence that on 7th January he went to a place in the bush near the Ipswich-road, about an hour’s drive from Brisbane. It was on the right-hand side of the road. He saw there a dead body, of which he made a superficial examination. The body was then put in a coffin and removed to the hospital morgue. At the paddock he saw Acting Sergeant JW Small. On the 8th January he held a post-mortem examination of the body at the hospital morgue. He found a bullet wound in the skull. The body otherwise was very much decomposed. His opinion was that the shot was fired from behind. Besides, the bullet had passed right through the head, there being evidence of entrance and exit. The bullet that caused the wounds would certainly have caused death if fired at a living person. He saw the clothes taken from body, which were handed to Constable Jas Proud. (The skull was produced, and Dr Wray showed that the bullet had entered the back and come out at the forehead.) The body he examined was that of a male.

    Frederick John Hill, father of the deceased, said he was a saddler, residing at Nundah. On 10th December his son, Alfred Stephen, left home at Nundah to go to Redbank Plains, between Oxley and Ipswich. He left on a red and white skewbald pony. Witness never saw the boy alive again. He first saw a sign of him on 7th January the other side of Oxley, about a mile on the Ipswich side of the Oxley Hotel, and about 250 yards off the Ipswich-road. It was in bush country. He saw the remains of his boy, the body being very much decomposed. Some time afterwards he saw Dr Wray on the scene, and the body taken away in a shell. He identified the body by the clothes and the loss of one tooth in the upper jaw in front. Besides the clothing on the body there was an extra pair of tweed trousers, which were lying on the left hand side of the body, which was lying face downwards. The trousers were about a yard away. The boy’s riding whip was also there. This was lying close to the extra trousers. He identified the trousers and whip as belonging to the boy, and he believed also that the boots produced were those he wore on leaving home. He also saw the body of the pony which the boy had been riding, which he also identified. The body of the pony was also very much decomposed. His deceased son had been 15½ years old, and a saddler; he was born in Townsville.

    Mr Hill was much affected while giving his evidence, and had to be accommodated with a chair.

    Constable James Proud, stationed at Brisbane, deposed than on 7th January he went to a paddock between Oxley and Ipswich, and a little distance from the Oxley Hotel. In that paddock he saw a dead body, dressed in male attire. He saw beside the body a pair of tweed trousers and a riding whip. There were also present Chief Inspector Stuart, Sergeant Shannon, and Acting Sergeant Small. The body was placed in a shell, but previous to that Dr Wray made an examination of it. It was taken to the Brisbane Hospital morgue. He was present at the morgue the next day, and saw Dr Wray make a post-mortem examination. Witness took charge of all the clothing, hat, and boots, which he produced.

    The next witness was Edward Litton Carns Wilson. When the police brought him in, they were about to place him in the dock, but were sternly told to put him in the witness-box. He said he was a teacher, and had been recently employed at the Ipswich Grammar School. He had been in Queensland since last July. He was employed at the Ipswich school till 9th December, and left Ipswich on Saturday morning, 10th of that month, about 11 o’clock, as near as he could say. He left alone, but met his boy, Claude Wilson, and the boy who was minding his goat, Guy Betts. He met them opposite the Girls’ Grammar School, on the Bundamba-road. They all walked on towards Brisbane, not quite to Bundamba township. Guy Betts went on to get some fruit and cakes at a shop, and witness and his son waited for him until he came back. Witness unharnessed the goat from its cart, and gave it to Guy Betts to lead back to Ipswich. Witness’s son had been in a cart drawn by a goat. Witness led the cart through Bundamba, the son being in the cart. He meant to take the train a portion of the way; but he met a Mr Makepeace, whom he knew, and asked for a lift in his cart. He gave them a lift as far as the Redbank railway crossing.

    At this point Wilson asked that two boys at a window facing him should be sent away, which was done.

    Wilson, continuing, said he took the cart with the boy from Mr Makepeace’s cart, and drew it after him toward Goodna. He rested at the Royal Mail Hotel for half-an-hour, and came on in the direction of Brisbane, still drawing the cart with his son in it. After leaving Goodna he went in the direction of Oxley, where he intended to stay that night. He went right on to the Oxley Hotel, though he had some trouble in finding the place. It was after sundown when he arrived at the hotel. He ordered tea and a bedroom. He had tea there. Before coming to Oxley Hotel he met a man riding on what appeared to him to be a dark horse; but the light was very imperfect. He asked the man how far it was to Oxley, and he understood him to say it was either three or four miles. He fancied the man had a beard, and a long coat, but he did not take particular notice. He believed he met a swagman, but he was not certain. He believe he asked him what was the matter with the child, and that he (witness) told him, and, further, that he gave the man sixpence. He believed it was near where he met the horseman. He was not sure, because he did not take much notice; but he believed it was not far from where he met him. He met no other person, not that he recollected. He did not meet a boy riding a piebald or skewbald pony on the Goodna side of the Oxley Hotel. He did not at any time turn the perambulator round and wheel the boy back in the direction of Ipswich. He did not go off the road into the bush on the right side going to Ipswich. He did not leave the boy about a mile on the Ipswich side of the Oxley Hotel and go away into the bush. He did not at any time go into the bush on the way. He had no occasion to.

    Wilson: Perhaps you may allow me to explain where I did leave the boy.

    Sergeant Shanahan: Yes.

    Wilson said he left the boy on the outskirts of Oxley, and went to a house to ask the way to the Oxley Hotel. It was about five minutes’ walk from the Oxley Hotel on the Goodna side. He did not have a revolver in his pocket at Ipswich. He did not put a revolver in his pocket at Ipswich when coming away—he hadn’t one to put in. He had no sort of firearms. He had never for the last thirteen or fourteen years had a revolver, pistol, or other small firearm. He did not fire a shot at any place between Ipswich and Oxley on the 10th December. He did not tell any one he had fired a shot. He did not tell any one he had shot a hawk on the wing in the bush between those places. He never spoke to any one about such a thing. After coming from Ipswich he did not tell any one he had sold a revolver in Brisbane. He stayed at the Oxley Hotel on Saturday night, 10th December, and had tea there. He occupied the room on the ground floor opening out on to the road and on the Ipswich side. There were two single beds in the room. He slept in the bed with his son that night. He slept with the boy because the boy usually asked for that when they were together. They often did on board ship, as his son preferred it. He did not know what time he went to bed. He never went off the premises; but may have gone in for a glass of beer. It may have been an hour after they arrived at the hotel that they went to bed—it was not more. He put the boy into bed first. Witness got up first in the morning. On Sunday 11th December, he walked up and down in front of the hotel while the boy dressed. After breakfast he drew the boy in the cart towards Corinda, the landlord directing him. They crossed the Indooroopilly Bridge, and on arrival at Brisbane went to the Metropolitan Hotel, where they stayed till Monday, 12th December. On the Monday he did not tell any one that he had sold a revolver in Brisbane. He left that day for Melbourne, in the steamer Rockton.

    After the evidence had been read over, Wilson said: I should like to say where I left my son. It was Corinda. He may have thought it was somewhere else. There were a few bushes about, and he may have thought I went into the bush; I went into the Corinda Railway Station to get a drink. I left him just off the main road, the cart propped up on a stump. I was away for about ten or fifteen minutes, but not more.

    Wilson was then removed from the court. His crippled son was then carried in and placed on a chair. Questioned, he said his name was Claude Wilson, and his age 11 years. He knew what happened to boys when they told a lie. He knew the book shown him was a Bible.

    The boy was then sworn, Mr Harris explaining to him the effect of the oath.

    The boy, examined, said he was 11 years of age on 23rd December last. He was living at Ipswich with his father, and came away in his (the boy’s) cart, drawn by his father. It was drawn by a goat to Bundamba. Guy Betts was with them on leaving Ipswich, and as far as Bundamba. They met Wilson at Limestone Hill, and came on towards Brisbane. They met Mr Makepeace, who gave them a lift as far as Redbank. His father only called at a church before meeting Makepeace. There were the Racehorse and the Prince Alfred hotels on the way. His father had some ale at both of these places. This was before meeting Mr Makepeace. When they came to the Redbank Crossing they got out of the cart and came towards Brisbane. Makepeace went away, and witness was placed in the little cart, Wilson dragging the cart after him as far as the next hotel, kept by Janet Simpson. His father went into the hotel, where he saw him asking for some ale. On leaving there they went on to Goodna, the father still dragging the cart. Mrs Coleman kept the hotel at Goodna. They didn’t stop long; his father took him into the hotel, where the former again had some ale. When they left they moved on to Oxley. His father dragged the cart, except at the hills, when he pushed it up. On the way to the Oxley Hotel they met a boy riding a piebald horse, then a swagman, and a lady and gentleman in a cart—in that order. He noticed there was a sewing machine in the cart. The boy was on the right-hand side of the road of any one coming to Brisbane, and the left-hand side to Ipswich. The boy, he thought, was older than he (witness). The pony was red and white. The animal was going at a walking pace up the hill when they met. It was not far from where another road branches off. His father wheeled him back a few yards towards Ipswich, and then went into the bush. It was about the length of the courtroom. As he was being wheeled back he could see the boy on the piebald pony just by the fence which surrounds a hollow with some stones. His father, when he went into the bush, went towards Ipswich. He (witness) was left on the left-hand side of the road going to Brisbane. His father went into the bush on the same side—the right-hand side going to Ipswich. Witness was facing towards Oxley. He had pushed the cart back up the hill, and left it in that way. When his father commenced to push him back in the same direction in which the boy with the piebald pony was going, witness asked his father where he was going. He answered, “Into the bush, but I will be back soon.” The fence was broken down a bit, and his father went through the opening. He turned round to look where his father was going. He could only see him a short distance, and then he lost sight of him, as there were some trees. He waited for some time, and heard the report of a revolver. Then he waited for some time, and his father came back. He had gone in the bush in the direction of Ipswich. He came out a little higher up than where he was. He said he had shot a hawk. His father, when he arrived, at first asked him if he was all right, and witness told him yes. Witness also asked him where he had been, and he said he had shot a hawk in the bush, and hit it on the wing. His father also asked him if he thought he had been a long time. With regard to the hawk, his father also said he must not say anything about it. His father then wheeled him on to Oxley. The swagman they met came out of a road on the right hand side of the Ipswich-road going to Brisbane. His father talked to the swagman, but he could not hear what was said, as they spoke in low tones. They were only talking a short while, then witness and his father came on. Nothing occurred till they got to the Oxley Hotel other than they met the lady and gentleman in the cart, and this his father called at a house on the left hand going to Ipswich. He did not stay long. Witness heard him speaking to someone whom he thought was a man. It was just dusk. His father then drew him in the cart to the Oxley Hotel, where his father had some ale. Then they had tea. After tea, his father put him into bed in a room with the door opening outside on to the road, at the end of the hotel. There were two beds in the room, the beds being small. Witness slept alone. He did not see his father going to bed; he (witness) was asleep. He did not see his father getting up on the following morning. His father woke him up. They had breakfast, and came away in the same style as before—witness in the cart dragged by his father. They came towards Brisbane. They passed Corinda Station; that was the only place he remembered. When they came to the station his father went in and asked if there was any train to Southport. Witness was left on the grass outside, the cart resting on the stump of a tree. His father came back, and he (witness) asked him if there was any train to Southport, and he said no, also that he could walk to Brisbane, as it was only seven or eight miles more. They crossed the river by a bridge five miles from Brisbane, his father said. On arrival at Brisbane they went to the Exchange Hotel, and then to the Metropolitan Hotel, where they stayed that night. The next morning his father took a shirt away to be washed. He told him that he had taken the shirt to be washed, and that he had sold the revolver at the nearest shop to the hotel. He (witness) knew what a revolver was. His father showed him the one he first saw at Ipswich. He also showed him how to load it. A piece of iron had to be puled back, and showed a round piece with holes in it. Into this cartridges were put. He knew these were cartridges because it was on the cardboard box. He saw the cover off the box, and notices that it contained cartridges. When he saw the box five cartridges were in it. When his father was teaching him how to load the revolver he took it from his black trunk. It was in a leather case. When they were leaving Betts’s he did not see his father put the leather case in his pocket, nor did he see it all the way. His father on leaving Ipswich had a parcel of clothes, which witness held in the cart. The time he saw the cartridges was the day before they left Ipswich, when he went up to the house where his father was staying.

    This inquiry was adjourned sine die, at the request of Sergeant Shanahan.

=====
DEMEANOUR OF THE WITNESSES.

    The inquiry held yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of the boy Hill, who was murdered at Oxley on the 10th December, was kept exceedingly secret by the police, so as not to pander to sensational hunters’ tastes. Consequently there were only the persons immediately concerned present. Even the Press were not directly informed until a very short time before the opening of the inquiry. It was at first decided to take the evidence in the room of the clerk of petty sessions at South Brisbane, but the place was afterwards altered to the court-room. He evidence of Dr Wray, who was the first witness, did not take very long. The principal feature was the production of the skull of the unfortunate boy, which the medical officer carried in a small box, covered with a kind of cloth. When the gruesome exhibit was exposed, the condition of Hill’s father, who was present, was most pitiable. He appeared as if he would give way. The police, if possible, would have been glad to have spared him the pain of witnessing the occurrence if he could have been induced to leave the room. The skull gave off an unpleasant smell, and those present were glad when it was removed. The father’s evidence did not take long. Mr Hill, considering all the unfortunate circumstances, bore up well, though rather tearful and distressed, especially when describing the positioning of the body and the clothes. Constable Proud also had an unpleasant exhibit in the clothes, hat, whip, &c. these also gave off a bad odour, and as they were allowed to remain on the floor of the courtroom the position was anything but pleasant. It was with relief that the Pressmen heard the order for their removal.

    The principal interest was centred round the appearance of Wilson. He was brought in by two police-officers from the back of the court. One of them opened the door of the prisoner’s dock with a view to putting Wilson in there, and the man was in the act of stepping into it as the mistake was noticed by Sergeant Shanahan and Mr Parry-Okeden, the Commissioner of Police, who ordered Wilson to be placed in the witness-box. Wilson wore a dark suit, with a sac coat slightly the worse for wear. He had on a white shirt, with a speckled neck-tie and collar standing up all round. A white pocket handkerchief showed out of his top coat-pocket. He had a dark scrubby beard, heavy moustache and eyebrows, and hair beginning to thin out. As he stood in the witness-box most of the time he rested his head on two fingers of his left hand, the elbow resting on the top of the box. His evidence was given without much incident, except on one occasion, when he asked that a couple of boys who had come to the window of the courtroom, and were peeping in, should be removed. Before an officer could move the lads had disappeared. The crippled boy, his son, was carried into the room and placed on a chair; but as it was rather low, he was put on an office stool. He was very neatly dressed. The lad was rather tearful at first; but soon recovered, though once or twice afterwards he exhibited slight signs of a relapse into his first condition. In speaking he stutters somewhat, but he was treated very kindly and considerately, and gave his evidence in a manner that met with general approval. He appeared to have a remarkable memory for detail, and proved himself one of the finest boy witnesses that many experienced officers had seen. His undoubted intelligence was patent. He has a nice, pleasant face, with an expression common to lads in a crippled or invalid condition, and many people present were quite taken with his manner. Sympathy with the poor boy was manifest.

    The bench was occupied by the clerk of petty sessions, Mr Wm Harris, and Mr T Austin, JJP.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 18 Feb 1899 41

CURRENT NEWS.
———


    The man Wilson, who was arrested at Albany, was brought up at Ipswich on Tuesday, and remanded for eight days after formal evidence had been taken.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 18 Feb 1899 42

DASTARDLY CRIME.
———◦———
THE OXLEY MURDER UNDER
INVESTIGATION.
———
WHO KILLED ALFRED STEPHEN HILL?
———
INQUIRY BY A JUDICIAL TRIBUNAL.
———

Brisbane, Friday.

    An inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of the boy Alfred Stephen Hill, who was murdered at Oxley on December 10 last, was commenced to-day at the South Brisbane Police Court. Only the officials, press representatives, and others directly interested were present. The examination was conducted by Sergeant Shannon. [sic] the Commissioner of Police and the father of the lad were also in attendance.

    Dr Wray, Government Medical Officer, stated that on January 3 he held a post mortem examination on the body at the hospital morgue. He found a bullet wound in the skull. The body otherwise was very much decomposed. His opinion was that the shot was fired from behind. The bullet passed right through the head, there being evidence of its entrance and exit. The bullet that caused the wound would certainly have caused death if fired at a living person. The skull was produced, and Dr Wray showed where the bullet entered at the back of the head and came out at the forehead.

    Frederick John Hill, father of the deceased, said that on December 10 his son, Alfred Stephen, left his home at Nundah to go to Redbank Plains, between Oxley and Ipswich. He rode a red-and-white skewbald pony. Witness never saw the boy alive again. He first saw signs of him on January 7 on the other side of Oxley, about a mile on the Ipswich side of the Oxley Hotel, about 250 yards off the Ipswich-road. It was in bush country, and he saw the remains of his son. The body was very much decomposed. He identified the body by the clothes and the loss of one tooth in the upper jaw. Besides the clothing on the body there was an extra pair of tweed trousers lying on the left-hand side of the body, which was lying face downwards. The trousers were about a yard away. The boy’s riding whip was also there.

    Constable Proud gave evidence relative to the finding of the body and the post mortem held.

    The next witness was Edward Litton Carus Wilson. When the police brought him into the court they were about to place him in the dock, but were sternly told to put him in the witness box. Wilson said he was a teacher recently employed at the Ipswich Grammar School. He had been in Queensland since last July, and was employed at Ipswich till the 9th December. He left Ipswich on Saturday December 10, about 11 o’clock. He left with his boy, Claude Wilson; but a boy who was minding his goat, Guy Betts, met them on the Bundamba-road. They walked on towards Brisbane. At the Bundamba township Guy Betts went to get fruit cakes at a shop. Witness and his son walked on until Betts came back. Witness unharnessed the goat from the cart, and gave it to Guy Betts to lead back to Ipswich. Witness wheeled the cart through Bundamba, his son being in it. He meant to take train portion of the way, but met Mr Makepeace, whom he knew, and asked for a lift in his cart. He gave them a lift as far as the Redbank railway crossing.

    (At this point Wilson asked that two boys at the window facing him be sent away, which was done.) Wilson, continuing, said he took the cart with the boy from Makepeace’s cart, drew it after him towards Goodna, rested at the Royal Mail Hotel half an hour, and then went on in the direction of Brisbane, still drawing the cart with his son in it. After leaving Goodna he went in the direction of Oxley, where he intended to stay the night. He went right on to the Oxley Hotel, though he had trouble in finding the place, as it was after sundown. When he arrived at the hotel he ordered tea and a bedroom. He had before coming to the Oxley Hotel met a man riding what appeared to be a dark horse, but the light was very imperfect. He asked the man how far it was to Oxley, and understood him to say either three or four miles. He fancied the man had a beard and a long coat, but did not take particular notice. He believed he met a swagman, but was not certain. He believed the swagman asked him what was the matter with the child, and that he (witness) told him. Further he gave the man 6d. He believed this was near where he met the horseman. He was not sure, because he did not take much notice, but believed it was not far from where he met him. He met no other persons, so far as he recollected. He did not meet a boy riding a piebald or skewbald pony on the Goodna side of the Oxley Hotel. He did not any time turn the perambulator round and wheel his son back in the direction of Ipswich. He did not go off the road into the bush. He did not leave the boy about a mile on the Ipswich side of the Oxley Hotel to go away into the bush. He did not at any time go into the bush on the way. He had no occasion to do so. “Perhaps you may allow me to explain where I did leave the boy?”

    Sergeant Shanahan: Yes.

    Wilson: I left the boy on the outskirts of Oxley, and went to a house to ask the way to the Oxley Hotel. It was about five minutes’ walk from the Oxley Hotel on the Goodna side. He did not have a revolver at Ipswich. He did not put a revolver into his pocket at Ipswich when coming away. He had not one to put in. He never had any sort of firearms for the last 13 or 14 years. He did not fire a shot at any place between Ipswich and Oxley on December 10. He did not tell anyone he had fired a shot. He did not tell anyone he shot a hawk on the wing in the bush between those places. He never spoke to anyone about such a thing after coming from Ipswich. He did not tell anyone that he sold a revolver in Brisbane. He stayed at the Oxley Hotel on Saturday night, 10th December. He had tea there and occupied the same room and bed with his son. Witness got up first on Sunday morning, December 11. He walked up and down the front of the hotel while the boy dressed. After breakfast he drew the boy in the cart towards Corinda. They crossed the Indooroopilly bridge, and on arriving at Brisbane went to the Metropolitan Hotel, where he stayed till Monday, December 12. On that day he did not tell anyone he sold a revolver in Brisbane. He left that day for Melbourne in the steamer Rockton.

    After the evidence was read off Wilson said: I should like to say where I left my son. It was at Corinda. He may have thought it was somewhere else. There were a few bushes about, and he may have thought I went into the bush. I wen into the Corinda railway station to get a drink, and left him just off the main road, the cart propped up on a stump. I was away about 10 to 15 minutes, not more.

    Wilson was then removed from the court.

    The crippled son was carried in and placed on a chair. He said his name was Claude Wilson, aged 11 years and described the journey in the cart in which he was drawn by his father as far as Goodna. At that place, said witness, his father had some ale. When they left they moved on to Oxley. On the way they met a boy riding a piebald horse, then a swagman, and a lady and gentleman in a cart in that order. He noticed a sewing machine in the cart. The boy, he thought, was older than witness. The pony was a red and white animal, and was going at a walking pace uphill. When they met it, it was not far from where another road branched off. His father wheeled him back a few yards towards Ipswich, then went into the bush. As he was being wheeled back he could see the boy on the piebald pony just by the fence which surrounds a hollow with some stones. When his father commenced to push him back in the same direction as the boy with the pony was going witness asked him where he as going. He answered, “Into the bush; but I will be back soon.” The fence was broken down a bit. As his father went through the opening witness turned round to look where he was going. He could only see him a short distance, and then lost sight of him, as there were some trees. He waited some time, during which he heard the report of a revolver. It was some time after the report before his father came back. He said he had shot a hawk. His father when he arrived first asked him if he was all right, and witness told him “Yes.” Witness asked him where he had been, and he said, “I shot a hawk in the bush; hit it in the wing.” His father asked him if he thought he had been a long time. With regard to the hawk, his father also said, “You must not say anything about it.” His father then wheeled him on to Oxley. The swagman they met came out of the road on the right-hand side of the Ipswich-road going to Brisbane. His father talked with the swagman, but witness could not hear what they said, as they spoke in low tones. They only talked a short while. Witness and his father then came to the Oxley Hotel. Witness heard him speaking to someone whom he thought was a man. It was just dusk. His father then drew him in the cart to the Oxley Hotel, where his father had some ale. After tea his father put him in bed in a room with a door opening outside on to the road and at the end of the hotel. There were two beds in the room. Witness slept alone. The following morning his father woke him. They came away in the same style as before. They came towards Brisbane and passed Corinda station. That was the only place he remembered. When they came to the station his father went in and asked if there was any train to Southport. They crossed the river by a bridge five miles from Brisbane, and came to the city.

    The inquiry was adjourned sine die at the request of Constable Shanahan.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Sat 18 Feb 1899 43

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———◦———
THE INQUEST.
———
PUBLIC EXCLUDED.
———
WILSON IN THE WITNESS-BOX.
———

Brisbane, February 17.

    An inquiry into the death of the boy Alfred S Hill, at Oxley, on December 10, was held to-day at South Brisbane. Only officials and representatives of the Press were allowed to be present.

    Dr Wray, Government medical officer, stated that on January 8 he made a post mortem of the body. He found a bullet wound in the skull. The shot, in his opinion, was fired from behind. A bullet had passed through the head, and was the cause of death.

    Frederick John Hill deposed that his son, the deceased, left his home at Nundah to go to his aunt’s residence at Redbank Plains. The boy was then riding a pony, and witness never saw him alive again.

    Edward Litton Carus Wilson was the next witness. When the police were about to place him in the dock, he sternly told them to put him in the witness-box. He said until recently he had been employed at the Ipswich Grammar School. He had been in Queensland since July last, and had been employed at Ipswich till December 9. He left on Saturday morning, the 10th of that month, about 11 o’clock. He left alone, and met his boy Claude Wilson and a boy who had been minding his goat, Guy Betts, on Bundamba-road, and walked with them towards Brisbane. Betts went to get some fruit and cakes at a shop. Witness and his son walked about until he came back. Witness unharnessed the goat from the cart and gave it to Betts to lead back to Ipswich. Witness led the cart through Bundamba, his son being in it. He meant to take train for part of the way to Brisbane, but meeting a man he knew, he got a lift to Redbank railway crossing.

    At this stage Wilson asked that two boys at the window facing him be sent away.

    Continuing his evidence, witness said he took the cart from the vehicle in which he had been given the lift, and drew it after him towards Goodna. He rested at the Royal Mail Hotel for half an hour and then went in the direction of Brisbane. Still drawing his son in the cart, he proceeded to Oxley, though he had a difficulty in finding it as it was after sunset. When he arrived at the Oxley Hotel he ordered tea and a bedroom. Before reaching the hotel he met a man riding on a dark horse he asked him the distance to Oxley and fancied the man had a beard and a long coat. He also believed that he met a swagman, who asked him what was the matter with the child. He told the man, and gave him sixpence. He did not meet any other person. He did not go off the road into the bush. He did not have a revolver at Ipswich. He had had no sort of firearm for the last thirteen or fourteen years. He did not fire a shot in any place between Ipswich and Oxley. He did not tell anyone that he had fired a shot at a hawk on the wing in the bush between those places. He slept at the hotel in a bed with his son, because the boy, when they were together, preferred him to do so. He never left the place during the night. He was up first on Sunday morning, December 11th. After having breakfast he drove the boy in the cart towards Corinda. He got to Brisbane on December 12th, and stopped at the Metropolitan Hotel till the Monday following, when he left in the steamer Rockton for Melbourne.

    After his evidence had been read over to him, Wilson said, “I would like to say where I left my son. It was at Corinda. He may have thought it somewhere else. There were a few bushes about, and he may have thought I went into them, whereas I went into Corinda railway station to get a drink. I left him just off the main road propped on a stump. I was away ten or fifteen minutes.”

    Wilson’s son was then carried and placed on a chair. He said his name was Claude Wilson, and he was aged 11. He described the meeting with his father and the getting a lift to Redbank crossing. His father then placed him in the cart and dragged him as far as the next hotel. On the way to Oxley they met a boy riding a piebald horse, then a swagman, and next a lady and a gentleman in a cart. When they met the boy it was near where the road branched off. His father wheeled him back a few yards, and then went into the bush. When his father wheeled him in the same direction as the boy was going, witness asked where he was going. He said into the bush, and would be back soon. After his father had been gone some time he heard the report of a revolver. When his father came to him again, he said he had shot a hawk. He hit it on the wing. His father also said he must not say anything about it. Afterwards they went into the Oxley Hotel, where they stopped the night. His father slept in a separate bed. They reached Brisbane, where they stopped at the Metropolitan Hotel. The next morning his father told him that he had sold his revolver at the shop nearest the hotel.

    The inquiry was adjourned sine die.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Tue 21 Feb 1899 44

THE OXLEY AND GATTON
TRAGEDIES.
———○———
ACTION OF THE POLICE.
———
IMPORTANT DEVELOPMENTS PENDING.
———

    In connection with the recent tragedies as Oxley and Gatton important developments are pending. The evidence given by the lad Claude Wilson at the inquiry into the death of young Hill, near Oxley, on the 10th December last, is considered to have an important bearing on the mystery hitherto surrounding the murder; by the police were in possession of the information a few days after the arrest of Wilson, senior, in West Australia. As soon as young Wilson’s account of the trip from Ipswich to Brisbane and the statement as to the disposal by his father of a revolver in Brisbane were received the police made inquiries with the view of testing the story of the sale of the revolver. No person can be discovered who purchased such a weapon in Brisbane at that time. It will be remembered that in his evidence the lad Wilson said his father told him that he had taken a shirt to be washed, and that he had sold the revolver at the nearest shop to the hotel the morning after they came to Brisbane. If such a sale had taken place the police feel sure they would have been able to trace it.

Richard Burgess, murder suspect. Image: <em>The Queenslander</em>, Sat 14 Jan 1899, p. 75. Reproduction: SLQ
Richard Burgess, murder suspect.
Image: The Queenslander, Sat 14 Jan
1899, p. 75. Reproduction: SLQ

    The police are continuing inquiries in the Oxley district, and have been able to support a statement of the lad Wilson as to the people met near the scene of the murder of young Hill. The lady and gentleman described as having been seen driving and with a sewing machine in their cart were persons who were engaged in selling sewing machines. They had been interviewed by the police some weeks ago, but no mention was made of the sewing machine until Claude Wilson spoke of it. His sharp eyes had noticed it. The swagman to whom Wilson was speaking was seen later on by Mr and Mrs Cashing, of Oxley, who were also driving in the locality, and the police have a strong impression that they will be able to prove who the swagman was. It may be mentioned that some discoveries made at the scene of the Oxley tragedy have not yet been made public.

    In connection with the Gatton tragedy, the Commissioner of Police, Mr Parry-Okeden, left Brisbane yesterday afternoon for Gatton, and after a conference there with Inspector Urquhart will go to Ipswich, where a prosecution against Wilson, on a charge apart from the Oxley business will be opened. It is understood that the police are by no means satisfied that Burgess, who has been mentioned in connection with the Gatton case, has proved that he was in another part of the district at the time of the triple murder. The statements of Burgess are being thoroughly tested, and, as in the Ayrshire Downs cases, it is likely that men will be sent over the country between various places to see in what time the journeys can be made.

    We learn that the police are hopeful of being able to institute prosecutions both for the Gatton and Oxley murders at an early date, and that important developments may be looked for in the course of a few days.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Thu 23 Feb 1899 45

QUEENSLAND.
———

THE CHARGE AGAINST ELC WILSON.

    Edward Litton Carus Wilson, respecting whom sensational evidence was given last Friday in connection with the Oxley murder, was brought before the Ipswich Police Court to-day charged with committing a serious offence at Ipswich in November last. The hearing was adjourned for a week.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Thu 23 Feb 1899 46

THE IPSWICH SCANDALS.
———○———
The Man Wilson Before the Court.
———
(By Our Special Reporter.)
———

    The proceedings in connection with the Ipswich scandals, in which the man ELC Wilson, an ex-grammar school master, is dangerously involved, were carried a stage further yesterday. Wilson, who it will be remembered was flying the country when arrested in Western Australia, had a week ago been formally charged with corrupting youth, and the evidence taken yesterday was in continuation. It certainly was of a startling and revolting character, and under the circumstances the granting of the application of the senior sergeant by the Police Magistrate, that the case should be heard with closed doors, was a very wise course to adopt. Not that there was a very great amount of morbid curiosity evinced. Indeed, not more than a score of people assembled. This may have been attributable to some extent to the fact that it was not generally known that Wilson was to be brought up; but evil news flies fast, and there is no doubt that had there been any desire on the part of the public, the court might easily have been crowded. The few people who attended—the majority were young fellows—were not allowed into the court, but they crowded round the doorway, thus to catch a glimpse of Wilson in the dock. Not unnaturally, perhaps, the accused resented their rude stare, and indicated more than once by gestures that he would be pleased were it prevented. Having heard, prior to reaching the court, that the case would be heard in camera, I interviewed Mr McFarlane (the Police Magistrate), and Mr William] Edward] Parry-Okeden (Commissioner of Police), who was present throughout the proceedings, with the result that both gave a ready assent to the Press representatives being present.

    Immediately the court met, Senior-sergeant Johnson, who conducted the case, applied that the proceedings should be heard with closed doors, pleading that this was necessary in the interests of morality. The magistrate at once formally ordered the court to be cleared of strangers, which was done. Wilson, who wore a dejected appearance, and who up to now had kept his head below the level of the dock rail, raised his head at this, and as some of the public still loitered around the doorway, he looked anxiously towards it, and motioned to the police to clear the passages. He had an unkempt appearance, there being several weeks’ growth of hair on his face. Wilson was escorted in by Detective Shanahan and Acting Detective Weir.

    Mr R McGill announced that he appeared for Wilson, and in doing so made an application. He said Wilson had sent for him half-an-hour before the court met, but on his going to the lockup the police, acting under instructions, had refused to allow him to see the accused, except in the presence and within the hearing of the police. He submitted that this was against all the rules of British fair play, and would, if persisted in, have the effect of debarring the accused from making his defence. Under the circumstances, he asked for an adjournment for half-an-hour, and that he be permitted to interview the accused out of hearing of the police, though he had no objection to their being within sight.

    Mr [Parry-] Okeden said he had attended with no intention of taking part in the proceedings, but it would be as well, after Mr McGill’s remarks, to state what his instructions were. They were that if a professional gentleman made an application to see Wilson he must see him in the presence and within the hearing of the police, unless he gave a promise not to refer to matters other than were embodied in the present charge or charges. Certain things had appeared in the public Press about other matters which, if referred to, might be somewhat prejudicial in other directions. He denied that the authorities had any desire to do anything not in accord with British justice, and if Mr McGill was prepared to give the promise not to refer to anything except the present cases and other cases of a similar nature, there was not the least objection to his interviewing Wilson out of hearing but within sight of the police. There never had been any objection.

    After further discussion, Mr McGill gave the required promise, and the court adjourned, Wilson appealing to the magistrate not to restrict him to half-an-hour. The magistrate said if further time was required Wilson’s counsel had only to apply for it.

    The half-hour, however, appeared to have been ample, for on the court reassembling after the lapse of that period Mr McGill was ready to proceed. The first witness called was a builder and contractor (it is not necessary to give his name). This witness stated that he had a son 13 years of age. He first met Wilson in the middle of October, when witness’s wife introduced him. Wilson, after remarking that witness’s son was a good boy and would like him to take his son Claude to school, also suggested that witness’s wife should make clothes for his boy, which she agreed to do. On 1st November witness received a letter from Wilson, one half of which he produced. The other half had been torn off because it had no connection with the case.

    On the letter being shown to Wilson by Mr McGill he admitted it was in his writing, but requested that the other half should be produced.

    Witness said that as a result of that letter Wilson’s son Claude went to witness’s house to board, it being arranged that witness’s son should take Claude to school in the goat-cart. Apart from the payment of board, Wilson was to give witness’s son private lessons three nights a week in lieu of the special school lessons he would lose in taking the boy Claude to school. The lessons were to be given at a house in Limestone-street, [Ipswich], and were continued for about six weeks. On [Friday] 28th October witness’s son went to Brisbane with Wilson, and returned the following Sunday.

    By Mr McGill: The arrangements were made by his wife, and ratified by him. The letter of 1st November was written to his wife, and shown by her to witness. He did not know where the other half of the letter was, or what became of it. He never made inquiries, but told the police there was another half. The police did not ask him to look for it. His boy went to Brisbane with Wilson with witness’s approval. Wilson explained the reason why the boy had not returned earlier. This explanation witness accepted. The friendly relations between witness and Wilson were maintained up to the time Wilson left—namely, on the 10th December.

    By Sergeant Johnson: Wilson’s explanation for detaining the boy was in the nature of an apology. Had he thought there had been any improper relations between Wilson and the boy he certainly would not have remained on friendly terms with him.

    The last witness’s son was next called. He is bright, intelligent, and mannerly in appearance. The boy gave his evidence in an apparently straightforward way, though it took a considerable time to obtain the details of the alleged offences. This was not due so much to any hesitancy on the part of the lad as to the necessity for accurately fixing times and places. The boy said he first met Wilson at a house in Darling-street. He went there in consequence of something another boy had told him. The boy then told how Wilson had visited his mother’s house after this meeting, and there inspected his school books. A few days after this Wilson gave him sixpence for bringing the crippled boy to where Wilson was living in Darling-street. Wilson invited him to look round the house, which he did.

    At this stage Wilson complained of an infirmity in the left leg, and asked to be allowed to sit down. Permission was granted.

    Witness went on to relate how he had gone to Wilson for the lessons, which were given in a sitting-room for four evenings. After this Wilson taught him in his bedroom. It was after the second night that Wilson commenced teaching here that the first offence complained of was committed. The nature of this offence witness explained. After the committal of the offence Wilson and witness went down town, the former giving him money to buy pies and soft drinks. Before committing the offence Wilson locked the door and drew down the blinds, telling witness he wanted to examine a decent boy for some young men who were going for doctors at a university in Sydney; also that he was to get £10 for it, and would give witness a present. Witness continued to go for night lessons. On the third or fourth night afterwards Wilson repeated the offence. When visiting Brisbane with Wilson and his son, the three stayed at a hotel, where the offence was twice repeated. They returned to Ipswich at 1 o’clock on Sunday morning, going to Wilson’s house, the three sleeping there. Subsequently, Wilson further interfered with him at Ipswich, and almost immediately afterwards committed another kind of offence, which he described. The details were of a disgusting nature, and quite unfit for publication. Witness detailed other subsequent offences. Wilson, after their committal, giving the boy money with which to buy pies and soft drinks.

    By Mr McGill: Witness drove Wilson’s son in a goat-cart to and from a lady’s school in Thorn-street, and for this Wilson paid him. At the time he was in the sitting-room and bedroom where the offences were alleged to have been committed there were people in the other rooms; he could hear them talking. He did not know who locked the bedroom door, or whether there was a key to it; but there was a catch at the bottom of the lock. He knew this because he once unfastened it. All the time he received his lessons in the sitting-room he never saw anyone else there. He did not complain to his father or mother, and Wilson said when they went to Brisbane they were going to have mended the irons Claude wore on his legs. While in Brisbane, Wilson visited Savage’s shop for the purpose, Wilson said, of having the irons repaired. He went to Wilson’s place on his return to Ipswich at 1 am on Sunday, because Wilson said it was too late for him to go home, and that he had better go with him. He received 2s a week for wheeling Claude about, and the money he received with which he bought the pies and soft drinks was not part payment. He only asked him once for part of his wages to take home; he never asked him for money with which to buy sweets.

    The owner of the house in which Wilson lodged, and in which the majority of the alleged offences were said to have been committed, gave evidence of Wilson’s occupancy of the rooms. Wilson left his house for good on the 10th December, for he had on two separate occasions lodged at his (witness’s) house. He had several times seen the boy who had just given evidence at Wilson’s room. When Wilson was not using the sitting-room witness’s family sometimes occupied it. Sometimes his family would use the sitting-room when Wilson was in his bedroom. Witness had seen the boy who had just deposed in Wilson’s bedroom several times. He gave further evidence in amplification of these statements, after which the police asked for a remand for eight days for the production of further evidence. The application was granted, and the accused was removed from the dock.

    It did not transpire in court, but it is understood that apart from the case which was practically opened yesterday, there are at least four others of a similar nature against Wilson. With a view to facilitating the accused in the preparation of his defence, the Commissioner has ordered that Wilson shall remain at Ipswich to-day, when his counsel will have the same facilities for interviewing him as were accorded yesterday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 23 Feb 1899 47

QUEENSLAND.
———◦———

Brisbane, Wednesday.


    ELC Wilson, against whom evidence was given last Friday in connection with the Oxley murder, was brought up in the police court at Ipswich to-day, charged with assault on a boy at Ipswich last November. The case was adjourned for a week.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Thu 23 Feb 1899 48

A SERIOUS CHARGE.
———◦———
WILSON ON TRIAL AT IPSWICH.
———

Brisbane, February 22.

    C Wilson, against whom sensational evidence was given last Friday in connection with the Oxley murder, was brought up at the Ipswich Police Court to-day, charged with committing an unnatural offence on a boy at Ipswich last November. Evidence of a most revolting nature was given by accused’s son.

    The further hearing of the case was adjourned for a week.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 25 Feb 1899 49

MOTHER’S LETTER.

    Dear Boys and Girls,—I have had to write a great deal about our Mutual Help Club in the “Ladies’ Columns,” because when a project is first started it ought to be well discussed and as many particulars as possible made known to the members. I did not intend to introduce the subject into our “Children’s Corner,” but from the letters we publish to-day you will see that the objects of the club very nearly concern the young members of the family, perhaps more nearly than they concern the older members.

    At present the hearts of all Brisbane boys and girls are stirred at the sad life of the poor boy, Claude Wilson. He has lived eleven years of crippled existence, and his young life is now embittered by another severe trial. The dear little fellow is described in the “Courier” as “a boy of undoubted intelligence. He has a nice pleasant face, with an expression common to lads in a crippled or invalid condition, and many people present were quite taken with his manner.” It is an old saying, that all things happen for the best; let us hope when this dark cloud has lifted from the boy’s life there will be silver lining and a happier fate in store for him. I think if a few of my boy friends would send him some school magazines, nice cheery letters (not mentioning anything about the trial), it would show him that he has some one to sympathise with him in this terrible trial. If the letters are sent at once I can have them delivered to him.

    Keeping you in kind remembrance, not forgetting a little bundle of unanswered letters,—I am yours affectionately.

DELPHIA.

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———◦———
SOME SENSATIONAL TESTIMONY.
————
ELC WILSON EXAMINED.

    The inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of the boy Alfred Stephen Hill who was murdered at Oxley on 10th December last, was held on the 17th instant, at the South Brisbane Police Court. Only the officials, Press representatives, and others directly interested were present. The examination was conducted by Sergeant Shanahan. The Commissioner of Police and the father of the lad were also in attendance. The bench was occupied by Messrs Harris and T Austin, JJP.

    Dr Wray, Government Medical Officer, gave evidence that on the 7th January he went to a place in the bush near the Ipswich-road, about an hour’s drive from Brisbane. He saw there a dead body, of which he made a superficial examination. The body was then put into a coffin and removed to the hospital morgue. At the paddock he saw Acting Sergeant JW Small. On the 8th January he held a post-mortem examination of the body at the hospital morgue. He found a bullet wound in the skull. The body otherwise was very much decomposed. His opinion was that the shot was fired from behind. Besides, the bullet had passed right through the head, there being evidence of entrance and exit. The bullet that caused the wound would certainly have caused death if fired at a living person. He saw the clothes taken from the body, which were handed to Constable Jas Proud. (The skull was produced, and Dr Wray showed that the bullet had entered at the back and come out at the forehead.) The body he examined was that of a male.

    Frederick John Hill, father of the deceased, said he was a saddler, residing at Nundah. On 10th December his son, Alfred Stephen, left home at Nundah to go to Redbank Plains, between Oxley and Ipswich. He left on a red and white skewbald pony. Witness never saw the boy alive again. He first saw a sign of him on 7th January, the other side of Oxley, about a mile on the Ipswich side of the Oxley Hotel. It was in bush country. He saw the remains of his boy, the body being very much decomposed. Some time afterwards he saw Dr Wray on the scene, and the body taken away in a shell. He identified the body by the clothes and the loss of one tooth in the upper jaw in front. Besides the clothing on the body there was an extra pair of tweed trousers, which were lying on the left hand side of the body, which was lying face downwards. The trousers were about a yard away. The boy’s riding whip was also there. This was lying close to the extra trousers. He identified the trousers and whip as belonging to the boy, and he believed also that the boots produced were those he wore on leaving home. He also saw the body of the pony which the boy had been riding, which he also identified. The body of the pony was also very much decomposed. His deceased son had been 15½ years old, and a saddler; he was born at Townsville.

    Mr Hill was much affected while giving his evidence, and had to be accommodated with a chair.

    Constable James Proud, stationed at Brisbane, deposed that on 7th January he went to a paddock between Oxley and Ipswich, and a little distance from the Oxley Hotel. In that paddock he saw a dead body, dressed in male attire. He saw beside the body a pair of tweed trousers and a riding whip. There were also present Chief Inspector Stuart, Sergeant Shannon and Acting Sergeant Small. The body was placed in a shell, but previous to that Dr Wray made an examination of it. It was taken to the Brisbane Hospital morgue. He was present at the morgue the next day, and saw Dr Wray make a post-mortem examination.

    Witness took charge of all the clothing, hat, and boots, which he produced.

    The next witness was Edward Litton Carns Wilson. When the police brought him in, they were about to place him in the dock, but were sternly told to put him in the witness-box. He said he was a teacher, and had been recently employed at the Ipswich Grammar School. He had been in Queensland since last July. He was employed at the Ipswich school till 9th December, and left Ipswich on Saturday morning, 10th of that month, about 11 o’clock, as near as he could say. He left alone, but met his boy, Claude Wilson, and the boy who was minding his goat, Guy Betts. He met them opposite the Girls’ Grammar School, on the Bundamba-road. They all walked on towards Brisbane, not quite to Bundamba township. Guy Betts went on to get some fruit and cakes at a shop, and witness and his son waited for him until he came back. Witness unharnessed the goat from its cart, and gave it to Guy Betts to lead back to Ipswich. Witness’s son had been in a cart drawn by a goat. Witness led the cart through Bundamba, the son being in the cart. He meant to take the train a portion of the way; but he met a Mr Makepeace, whom he knew, and asked for a lift in his cart. He gave them a lift as far as the Redbank railway crossing.

    Wilson, continuing, said he took the cart with the boy from Mr Makepeace’s cart, and drew it after him towards Goodna. He rested at the Royal Mail Hotel for half-an-hour, and came on in the direction of Brisbane, still drawing the cart with his son in it. After leaving Goodna he went in the direction of Oxley, where he intended to stay that night. He went right on to the Oxley Hotel, though he had some trouble in finding the place.. It was after sundown when he arrived at the hotel. He ordered tea and a bedroom. He had tea there. Before coming to Oxley Hotel he met a man riding on that appeared to him to be a dark horse; but the light was very imperfect. He asked the man how far it was to Oxley, and he understood him to say it was either three or four miles. He fancied the man had a beard, and a long coat, but he did not take particular notice. He believed he met a swagman, but he was not certain. He believed he asked him what was the matter with the child, and that he (witness) told him, and further, that he gave the man sixpence. He believed it was near where he met the horseman. He was not sure, because he did not take much notice; but he believed it was not far from where he met him. He met no other person, not that he recollected. He did not meet a boy riding a piebald or skewbald pony on the Goodna side of the Oxley Hotel. He did not at any time turn the perambulator round and wheel the boy back in the direction of Ipswich. He did not go off the road into the bush on the right side going to Ipswich. He did not leave the boy about a mile on the Ipswich side of the Oxley Hotel and go away into the bush. He did not at any time go into the bush on the way. He had no occasion to.

    Wilson: Perhaps you may allow me explain where I did leave the boy.

    Sergeant Shanahan: Yes.

    Wilson said he left the boy on the outskirts of Oxley, and went to a house to ask the way to the Oxley Hotel. It was about five minutes’ walk form the Oxley Hotel, on the Goodna side. He did not have a revolver at Ipswich. He did not put a revolver in his pocket at Ipswich when coming away—he hadn’t one to put in. He had no sort of firearms. He had never for the last thirteen or fourteen years had a revolver, pistol, or other small firearm. He did not fire a shot at any place between Ipswich and Oxley on the 10th December. He did not tell any one he had fired a shot. He did not tell any one he had shot a hawk on the wing in the bush between those places. He never spoke to any one about such a thing. After coming from Ipswich he did not tell anyone he had sold a revolver in Brisbane. He stayed at the Oxley Hotel on Saturday night, 10th December, and had tea there. He occupied the room on the ground floor opening out on to the road and on the Ipswich side. There were two single beds in the room. He slept in the bed with his son that night. He slept with the boy because the boy usually asked for that when they were together. They often did on board ship, as his son preferred it. He did not know what time he went to bed. He never went off the premises; but may have gone in for a glass of beer. It may have been an hour after they arrived at the hotel that they went to bed—it was not more. He put the boy into bed first. Witness got up first in the morning. On Sunday, 11th December, he walked up and down in front of the hotel while the boy dressed. After breakfast he drew the boy in the cart towards Corinda, the landlord directing him. They crossed the Indooroopilly Bridge, and on arrival at Brisbane went to the Metropolitan Hotel, where they stayed till Monday, 12th December. On the Monday he did not tell any one that he had sold a revolver in Brisbane. He left that day for Melbourne, in the steamer Rockton.

    After the evidence had been read over, Wilson said: I should like to say where I left my son. It was Corinda. He may have thought it was somewhere else. There were a few bushes about, and he may have thought I went into the bush; I went into the Corinda Railway Station to get a drink. I left him just off the main road, the cart propped up on a stump. I was away for ten or fifteen minutes, but not more.

    Wilson was then removed from the court. His crippled son was then carried in and placed on a chair. Questioned, he said his name was Claude Wilson, and his age 11 years. He knew what happened [to] boys when they told a lie. He knew the book shown to him was a Bible.

    The boy was then sworn. Mr Harris explaining to him the effect of the oath.

    The boy, examined, said he was 11 years of age on 23rd December last. He was living at Ipswich with his father, and came away in his (the boy’s) cart, drawn by his father. It was drawn by a goat to Bundamba. Guy Betts was with them on leaving Ipswich, and as far as Bundamba. They met Wilson at Limestone Hill, and came on towards Brisbane. They met Mr Makepeace, who gave them a lift as far as Redbank. His father only called at a church before meeting Makepeace. There were the Racehorse and the Prince Alfred hotels on the way. His father had some ale at both of these places. This was before meeting Mr Makepeace. When they came to the Redbank crossing they got out of the cart and came towards Brisbane. Makepeace went away, and witness was placed in the little cart, Wilson dragging the cart after him as far as the next hotel, kept by Janet Simpson. His father went into the hotel, where he saw him asking for some ale. On leaving there they went on to Goodna, the father still dragging the cart. Mrs Coleman kept the hotel at Goodna. They didn’t stop long; his father took him into the hotel, where the former again had some ale. When they left they moved on to Oxley. His father dragged the cart, except at the hills, when he pushed it up. On the way to the Oxley Hotel they met a boy riding a piebald horse, then a swagman, and a lady and gentleman in a cart—in that order. He noticed there was a sewing machine in the cart. The boy was on the right-hand side of the road of any one coming to Brisbane, and the left-hand side to Ipswich. The boy, he thought, was older than he (witness). The pony was red and white. The animal was going at a walking pace up the hill when they met. It was not far from where another road branches off. His father wheeled him back a few yards towards Ipswich, and then went into the bush. It was about the length of the courtroom. As he was being wheeled back he could see the boy on the piebald pony just by the fence which surrounds a hollow with some stone. His father, when he went into the bush, went towards Ipswich. He (witness) was left on the left-hand side of the road going to Brisbane. His father went into the bush on the same side—the right-hand side going to Ipswich.. Witness was facing towards Oxley. He had pushed the cart back up the hill, and left it in that way. When his father commenced to push him back in the same direction in which the boy with the piebald pony was going, witness asked his father where he was going. He answered, “Into the bush, but I will be back soon.” The fence was broken down a bit, and his father went through the opening. He turned round to look where his father was going. The could only see him a short distance, and then he lost sight of him, as there were some trees. He waited for some time, and heard the report of a revolver. Then he waited for some time and his father came back. He had gone in the bush in the direction of Ipswich. He came out a little higher up than where he was. He said he had shot a hawk. His father, when he arrived at first asked him if he was all right, and witness told him yes. Witness also asked him where he had been, and he said he had shot a hawk in the bush, and hit it on the wing. His father also asked him if he thought he had been a long time. With regard to the hawk, his father also said he must not say anything about it. His father then wheeled him on to Oxley. The swagman they met came out of a road on the right hand side of the Ipswich-road going to Brisbane. His father talked to the swagman, but he could not hear what was said, as they spoke in low tones. They were only talking a short while, then witness and his father came on. Nothing occurred till they got to the Oxley Hotel other than that they met the lady and gentleman in the cart, and that his father called at a house on the left hand going to Ipswich. He did not stay long. Witness heard him speaking to some one whom he thought was a man. It was just dusk. His father then drew him in the cart to the Oxley Hotel where his father had some ale. Then they had tea. After tea, his father put him into bed in a room with the door opening outside on the road, at the end of the hotel. There were two beds in the room, the beds being small. Witness slept alone. He did not see his father going to bed; he (witness) was asleep. He did not see his father getting up on the following morning. His father woke him up. They had breakfast, and came away in the same style as before—witness in the cart dragged by his father. They came towards Brisbane. They passed Corinda Station; that was the only place he remembered. When they came to the station his father went in and asked if there was any train to Southport. Witness was left on the grass outside, the cart resting on the stump of a tree. His father came back, and he (witness) asked him if there was any train to Southport and he said no, also that he could walk to Brisbane, as it was only seven or eight miles more. They crossed the river by a bridge five miles from Brisbane, his father said. On arrival at Brisbane they went to the Exchange Hotel, and then to the Metropolitan Hotel, where they stayed that night. The next morning his father took a shirt away to be washed. He told him that he had taken the shirt to be washed, and that he had sold the revolver at the nearest shop to the hotel. He (witness) knew what a revolver was. His father showed him the one he first saw at Ipswich. He also showed him how to load it. A piece of iron had to be pulled back, and showed a round piece with holes in it. Into this cartridges were put. He knew these were cartridges because it was on the cardboard box. He saw the cover off the box, and noticed that it contained cartridges. When he saw the box five cartridges were in it. When his father was teaching him how to load the revolver he took it from his black trunk. It was in a leather case. When they were leaving Betts’s he did not see his father put the leather case in his pocket, nor did he see it all the way. His father on leaving Ipswich had a parcel of clothes, which witness held in the cart. The time he saw the cartridges was the day before they left Ipswich, when he went up to the house where his father was staying.

    The inquiry was adjourned sine die, at the request of Sergeant Shanahan.

IPSWICH OFFENCES.
WILSON BEFORE THE COURT
(By Telegraph from Our Special Reporter.) 

Ipswich courthouse. Image: <em>Australian Town and Country Journal</em>, Sat 3 Nov 1883, p. 841. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Ipswich courthouse. Image: Australian Town and Country Journal,
Sat 3 Nov 1883, p. 841. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

Ipswich, February 22.

    ELC Wilson was brought up at the Police Court to-day, before Mr Macfarlane, PM, charged with unmentionable offences at Ipswich. The fact that he was to be brought up was not generally known, consequently there was not a large attendance of the public; and those who appeared were not admitted, except to the passages.

    Immediately the court met, Senior-sergeant Johnson applied that the case be heard with closed doors, pleading that this was necessary in the interests of morality. The magistrate then ordered the court to be cleared of strangers, which was done.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Fri 3 Mar 1899 50

THE WILSON CASE.
———○———
A SECOND CHARGE.
———
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondent.)

Ipswich, March 2.

    ELC Wilson, on remand, was brought up before the Police Court again to-day. Another charge similar to the last one had been laid against him, and was proceeded with. A lad in the employ of a butchering firm gave evidence of offences having been committed on him exactly similar to those mentioned when Wilson was formerly before the court.

    On the lad’s evidence being completed, the court adjourned till too-morrow. The witness gave his evidence intelligently, and was not shaken by cross-examination.

    The prisoner appeared dejected, and kept his eyes fixed on the floor of the court. He was defended by Mr McGill.

    In the previous case against the prisoner he was further remanded for eight days.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 3 Mar 1899 51

QUEENSLAND.
———◦———

Brisbane, Thursday.

————

    ELC Wilson was before the Police Court again to-day, and another charge similar to the last one laid against him proceeded with. A lad in the employ of a butchering firm gave evidence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Fri 3 Mar 1899 52

THE GATTON AND
OXLEY CRIMES.
———◦———

Brisbane, March 2.


    FC Wilson was before the Police Court at Ipswich, to-day, on a charge of committing an unnatural offence on a boy. Accused seemed to be much dejected. The hearing was adjourned.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 4 Mar 1899 53

LATEST NEWS IN BRIEF.


    The man ELC Wilson, who is charged with corrupting youth at Ipswich, appeared before the Police Magistrate there on Wednesday.

    The case, which was heard in camera, was not concluded when the court rose, the police having applied for an eight days’ remand.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 11 Mar 1899 54

THE WILSON CASE.
———◦———
A SECOND CHARGE.
———
(By Telegraph from Our Correspondent.)

Ipswich, March 2.

    ELC Wilson, on remand, was brought up before the Police Court again to-day. Another charge similar to the last one had been laid against him, and was proceeded with. A lad in the employ of a butchering firm gave evidence.

    On the lad’s evidence being completed, the court adjourned till to-morrow. The witness gave his evidence intelligently, and was not shaken by cross-examination.

    The prisoner appeared dejected, and kept his eyes fixes on the floor of the court. He was defended by Mr McGill.

    In the previous case against the prisoner he was further remanded for eight days.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 25 Mar 1899 55

THE WILSON CASE AT IPSWICH.
———◦———
FURTHER CHARGES.

    ELC Wilson, on remand, was brought before the court here on the 16th instant. The first charge preferred against him after his return from Albany was proceeded with and concluded. Among the witnesses examined was the barmaid of the hotel in Brisbane, where the defendant, his son Claude, and another lad (one of the chief witnesses against him) stayed on the night of 28th October. She said that Wilson was now thinner than when he stayed at the hotel, but she could swear he was the same man. The defendant, through his solicitor (Mr R McGill) reserved his defence, and his committal was held over till other charges of a similar nature now pending against him had been concluded. The second charge was then gone on with, and after some witnesses had been examined the defendant was remanded.

    ELC Wilson, on remand, was brought before the court on Monday, as we learn from our Ipswich correspondent. Two more charges, similar to those already preferred against him, were proceeded with, but were not concluded, and the defendant was further remanded. This makes four separate charged that have now been brought against him.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Fri 31 Mar 1899 56

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———◦———
WILSON TO BE CHARGED.
———

Brisbane, March 30.

    The man ELC Wilson, now under committal on various offences a Ipswich, will shortly be charged with the murder of the lad Hill at Oxley last December. One of certain revolvers recently received by the Queensland police from Melbourne is likely to prove an important factor in the case.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Sat 1 Apr 1899 57

THE OXLEY TRAGEDY.
———◦———
WILSON PROBABLY CHARGED
———
IMPORTANT EVIDENCE FROM
MELBOURNE.
———

Brisbane, Friday.

    It is understood on reliable authority that ELC Wilson, who is now under committal for various offences in Ipswich, will shortly be charged with the murder of the lad Hill, at Oxley last year, and that one of the revolvers recently received by the Queensland police from Melbourne is likely to prove an important feature of the case.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 1 Apr 1899 58

THE WILSON CASE AT IPSWICH.
———◦———

Ipswich, March 24.

    The hearing of the charges brought against ELC Wilson was conducted at the Police Court to-day, before the Police Magistrate. In all, four charges have been brought against him—three for the alleged commission of the offence, and one for alleged attempt to commit. Senior-sergeant Johnson has prosecuted, and Sergeant Johnson and Constable Auld, of the Criminal Investigation Department, have been present most of the time. Mr R McGill appeared for the defendant. About fourteen witnesses were examined altogether, much of the evidence being corroborative. The defendant reserved his defence, and at the conclusion of the case for the prosecution to-day he was committed on al four charges, to take his trial at the Criminal Sittings of the District Court, to be held at Ipswich on Tuesday, 18th April. Throughout the trial the defendant has appeared listless and dejected, and appeared to take very little interest in what was going on around him.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Thu 6 Apr 1899 59

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———◦———
CHARGE AGAINST ELC WILSON.
———

Ipswich, Wednesday.

    The man ELC Wilson was charged at the police court to-day with the wilful murder of the boy Hill at Oxley in November.

    Wilson asked that he might be taken to the spot where it is alleged that he left his son and went into the bush. He said in the interests of the prosecution his boy had been taken there, and he asked that he might also be allowed to go there. He further stated that he intended to apply to the Crown for the appointment of someone to defend him.

    He was remanded until to-morrow.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Thu 6 Apr 1899 60

THE OXLEY TRAGEDY.
———○———
CHARGE OF MURDER.
———

    At the South Brisbane Police Court yesterday afternoon, ELC Wilson was charged, before Mr W Yaldwyn, PM, with the wilful murder of a lad named Hill, at Oxley, on the 10th December last. Sergeant Shanahan prosecuted.

    Constable Auld deposed to arresting the accused that morning about 9 o’clock at her Majestys’ prison. He read the warrant to accused, who made no reply. He produced the warrant.

    The accused was asked by the bench if he wished to ask the witness any question, and replied in the negative.

    Sergeant Shanahan made application for a remand till to-day, which was granted.

    At this stage the accused, who was about to be removed, said that he desired to make a request, which was that he should be taken to the place where his son said he left the road between Goodna and Oxley. He understood his son had been taken there in the interests of the prosecution, and in the interests of justice he asked to be allowed the same privilege.

    Sergeant Shanahan said a wire would be sent to defendant’s solicitor (Mr McGill) at Ipswich, and he thought the accused would be defended.

    Wilson said Mr McGill was not taking up this case. He intended to ask the Crown for legal assistance.

    Mr Yaldwyn said that no doubt the accused’s request would be attended to. The accused then asked to whom he should apply. Mr Yaldwyn said he did not know.

    Sergeant Shanahan said that the matter would be attended to. The requests made by defendant were rather premature.

    The accused was then taken from the court.

    Wilson presented a calm demeanour while in court, and spoke in a clear tone of voice.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Fri 7 Apr 1899 61

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———◦———
ELC WILSON ON TRIAL.
———

Brisbane, Thursday.

    In connection with the trial of ELC Wilson on a charged of having murdered the boy Hill at Oxley, 16 witnesses were examined to-day.

    The evidence showed that Wilson left Ipswich on the morning of December 10, after he had on the previous day sent goods on to the central station, Brisbane. His course was traced to Goodna by the evidence of the licensees of various hotels at which he stopped. He had a bottle of beer at each of the four hotels at which he stopped between the time he left Ipswich and 4 o’clock in the afternoon.

    Two witnesses from Bathurst (New South Wales), gave evidence as to Wilson possessing a revolver while employed as a master at All Saints’ College there.

    The accused was remanded for a week. There are still 25 witnesses to be examined.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Fri 7 Apr 1899 62

THE OXLEY TRAGEDY.
———○———
WILSON CHARGED WITH MURDER.
———
PROCEEDINGS AT THE POLICE COURT.

    There was quite an unaccustomed air of bustle at the South Brisbane Police Court yesterday morning, the usually deserted gallery being well filled by those who had learned that ECL Wilson would again make his appearance to answer a charge of having been concerned in causing the death of the boy Hill, at Oxley, in December last. In the body of the court there were seated at the table Sergeant Shanahan (prosecuting), Sub-inspector White, and Mr R McGill, who appeared for the defence. Mr McGill, it will be remembered, appeared for Wilson when charged at Ipswich. There were several other gentlemen connected with other cases, and an unusual number of police in court.

    The experiences through which he has passed have left traces upon Wilson which are very apparent to one who had not seen him since his happier days at the Ipswich Grammar School.

    Mr Yaldwyn, PM, occupied the bench, and the usual proclamation to witnesses having been made, the lad Betts was called to give evidence.

    Guy Henry Betts said he resided with his father, Wm Betts, at Darling-street, Ipswich. On the afternoon of Friday, 9th December last, defendant invited him to go to his place for dinner, which he did. Witness saw several boxes in Defendant’s bedroom labelled and addressed to Mr Betts, Central Station, Brisbane. Defendant asked witness to bring a drayman, and this being done the boxes were taken away. Next morning, at 10 o’clock, witness was again at defendant’s room in Walker’s house. They went together down town, and witness cashed a cheque for defendant, and gave him the money. Defendant afterwards asked witness to take his son Claude up the Limestone Hill, and this witness did. Claude was a cripple, unable to walk, and witness took him in a goat-cart. This was at half-past 11. Witness knew by the town clock. The road over Limestone Hill led to Brisbane. Defendant met witness and Claude on the Limestone Hill, and they walked along together as far as the Prince Alfred Hotel, where defendant got his son a drink. Mr Ferrent then came along, and defendant and he entered the hotel and had a drink. About a quarter of an hour was spent at the hotel. They then proceeded in the direction of Brisbane, and reached the Racecourse Hotel, where defendant again entered and had a drink of beer, which was given him in a bottle. They stopped here about another quarter of an hour. Defendant gave witness 6d to spend, and they returned towards a church in the direction of Ipswich. Going back to the corner of the hotel fence, the goat was taken out of the cart and given to witness, who, according to previous arrangements, took it back to Ipswich. Defendant said he was going to Southport, and would write to witness on Tuesday. The goat-cart referred to was the one in court. Defendant had not since written to him.

    Robert Kelly was next called, and sworn. He deposed that he was licensee of the Prince Alfred Hotel, Booval. On Saturday, 10th December last, at about 1 o’clock, defendant called at his hotel in company with the lad in the cart and another. Ginger beer was purchased for the boys and a bottle of beer for himself, which he drank. A glass of ginger beer was also obtained and taken out to another man. Defendant then proceeded towards Bundamba, in the direction of Brisbane.

    John Peacock Gordon, proprietor of the Racecourse Hotel, Bundamba, deposed that on the 10th December last defendant came to his hotel at about 2 o’clock in the afternoon and purchased a bottle of beer, which he drank. Ginger beer was taken to the two boys who accompanied him. Defendant afterwards went in the direction of Brisbane.

    Up to this point defendant had listened with evident interest to the evidence. Defendant’s counsel had asked no questions of the witnesses, contenting himself with taking notes.

    Joan Donald Henderson deposed that she was a single girl, residing with her grandmother (Mrs J Simpson), licensee of the Redbank Inn. Asked if she knew defendant, she said she did not know him at all. She remembered the afternoon of the 10th December last, between 3 and 4 o’clock, when a man called with a little boy, in a cart like the one produced. The man purchased a bottle of ale, which bottle was found empty after he had left. The man took the direction of Brisbane.

    Thomas Carter, wheelwright, carrying on business at Goodna, deposed that on the afternoon of 10th December last, at about 3.30, he saw defendant on the Brisbane road. He fixed the time by the arrival of the train from Brisbane, and because it was before he knocked off work, at 4 o’clock. Defendant was drawing a cart along, with a boy in it. Defendant passed in front of witness’s shop, and the cart produced was the one defendant was drawing. Defendant was going in the direction of Brisbane. The Royal Mail Hotel was about a quarter of an hour’s walk from his premises, in the direction of Brisbane.

    Benjamin Ford, storeman, deposed that he was employed by Messrs GH Wilson and Co, of Ipswich, where he resided. On 10th December last he left for Wynnum with his wife and five children in a spring-cart. Goodna was reached at seven minutes past 4. Witness looked at his watch as he passed Coleman’s Royal Mail Hotel. Outside the hotel was a goat-cart similar to the one in court.

    Annie Coleman, wife of the licensee of the Royal Mail Hotel at Goodna, deposed that defendant called at the hotel on the afternoon of 10th December, and carried his little boy in his arms to the rear premises. Defendant had a bottle of beer during a stay of about a quarter of an hour.

    Gerald Hanbury, assistant clerk of petty sessions at the South Brisbane court, was then called and sworn. He deposed to have seen defendant at the court on the 17th February, on which date a magisterial inquiry had been held into the cause of death of the lad Alfred Stephen Hill, before Messrs W Harris and T Austin, JJP. Defendant was called and sworn as a witness at that inquiry. Witness took defendant’s depositions, which he (defendant) signed, and which witness now produced. The depositions were duly tendered as evidence, after having been examined by defendant’s counsel.

    At this point defendant obtained leave to be seated. Mr McGill informing the court that accused suffered from an infirmity in one leg.

    Daniel Cuneen deposed that he was employed at All Saints College, Bathurst, New South Wales, as boots and yardman, and had filled the position for the past three years. Witness knew the defendant, who had been employed at the college as a master in 1897 for between six and nine months. Defendant left about October of that year. Defendant slept at the college, and witness remembered having seen what seemed to be a revolver on a table in defendant’s room. It was a bright revolver, and from a distance of four or five yards witness saw it pretty distinctly. No one else occupied the room but defendant. This was at the end of August or the beginning of September.

    Frederick George Davies, a clerk in the Bathurst Mercantile Company’s office at Bathurst, New South Wales, deposed that he had met defendant at the All Saints College Grounds, Bathurst, in September or early in October, 1897. Witness joined defendant in a game of cricket, and afterwards defendant asked him if he would like to run messages for him, and thus earn something for Christmas. Witness agreed, and at a subsequent interview in the study of the college defendant showed him a book of views. Defendant then picked up a bright nickel revolver, and pointing it towards, but not at, witness, asked him if he would like to end his life. Witness became very frightened, and did not reply. Defendant then took witness to his bedroom, where he behaved improperly. Witness said his friends would be anxious about him, and left. He afterwards made a complaint, and was confronted at the college with the defendant, who witness had afterwards seen dismissed.

    George James Crompton, a saddler, employed by Frederick John Hill, of Nundah, deposed to having known the deceased lad, Frederick John Hill. Mrs Catchpole, of Oxley, was witness’s grandmother. On the evening of 10th December last witness gave the lad Hill a note to leave at the residence of his uncle, Mr W Catchpole, Oxley. It was addressed to witness’s uncle, who lived with his grandmother. Witness did not see Hill leave Nundah.

    Constable Henry Bell, stationed at Indooroopilly, knew the man Frank Hillman in court. On the 5th January last he made a statement to witness, who took possession of the saddle, pouch, spurs, and bridle produced, and next day a shirt. The property was shown to Mr Hill, who identified them. On the 6th witness and others went to the bush beyond Oxley, where Hillman showed them the carcass of a piebald pony, branded J7H on the near shoulder. Witness thought that was the brand.

    Frank Hillman, shipwright, residing at Indooroopilly, remembered being in Brown and Walsh’s paddock collecting gum on the 5th January last. Witness’s young son was with him, and the latter found the decomposed carcass of a horse, with saddle, bridle, saddle-bag and surcingle upon it. Witness took possession of the saddlery, which he handed over to Constable Bell. The saddlery produced was the same. Witness went next day to the spot with the constable and Mr Hill.

    Constable James Proud deposed to having gone to Oxley on 6th January with Mr J Bridges and Mr Hill. Witness was shown the carcass of the horse before referred to, and an examination of the head revealed a hole in the forehead. The head was produced in court. On Saturday, the 7th January, witness went again to Oxley with Chief Inspector Stuart and Sergeant Shanahan. At a spot about 400 yards from the Ipswich-road witness saw the remains of a boy covered with bushes. It was about 150 yards from where the horse was found. Dr Wray made a superficial examination of the body before it was removed in a shell to the morgue. On Sunday, the 8th, witness saw Dr Wray hold a post mortem at the morgue, when witness took possession of all the clothing, consisting of a straw hat, coat, trousers, boots, collar, tie, and braces (produced). Another pair of trousers, a Spanish martingale, and a riding whip (produced) were found about 5ft from the body.

    At this point the court adjourned for lunch. The list of witnesses in the case totals forty-one, of which fourteen have been examined this morning, a very good performance for one forenoon. The inquiry is expected to last at least three days.

    Constable RW Henderson stated that he was stationed at Oxley, and on the 6th January last he saw the body of the horse, as described by previous witnesses. There was a hole in the forehead, apparently a bullet wound. Constable Proud took possession of the head. Witness cut the brand—J7H—from the carcass and gave it to Constable Auld. (That portion of the hide of the horse which remained was produced in court.) Next day he was present at the spot where the body of the boy was found, about 170 paces from the place where the horse was found. The boughs which covered the body appeared to have been broken from the bushes, except one sapling, which had been cut from a stump about twenty yards distant. There were quite a number of similar boughs cut from near this stump. A pair of trousers tied round with string lay about 4ft or 5ft from the body, and also a riding whip, both of which were uncovered. The examination of the body by Dr Wray and its removal were testified to.

    To the Bench: Witness said he considered the horse referred to was a skewbald, but it had been termed piebald by others.

    Frederick John Hill, saddler, of Nundah, said he was the father of the deceased boy, with whose murder the defendant was charged. On the afternoon of 10th December, at about 2.30, the boy left home to go to the residence of his uncle, Mr Greaves, at Redbank Plains. The boy wore a black and white straw hat, grayish tweed coat, and serge trousers, between fawn and gray colour. The boy rode a red and white piebald pony. He had heard it spoken of as a skewbald. The saddlery on the horse was described, and witness said the boy carried a spare pair of pants attached to the saddle with a strap, and also a spare shirt, which was in the saddle pouch. The pony was a slow one. The boy carried a flogger. Witness never saw him alive agin. The saddle, whip, and trousers, &c, produced were those the boy had with him. The clothes produced were what the boy had worn. On the 6th January last witness had identified the remains of the pony at Brown and Walsh’s paddock. Next day, at the same paddock, witness identified the remains of his son, which he knew by the teeth and the general appearance of his clothes. Witness knew the road from Nundah to the Oxley Hotel, and considered it would take the boy about three and a-half hours to reach the hotel; the boy would, therefore, get there about 6 o’clock.

    Daniel Cuneen, recalled, said he was perfectly satisfied, beyond all doubt, that the article he had seen in defendant’s bedroom at Bathurst was a revolver.

    Sergeant Shanahan at this point said that, having made unexpected progress in the examination of the witnesses, he had no further evidence available that afternoon. He desired, therefore, to ask for a remand until Thursday next, the 13th instant. Prisoner was accordingly remanded to the date mentioned.

    Mr McGill asked permission to interview his client before he was removed to gaol. Sergeant Shanahan said there was no objection whatever. An order was accordingly made out and signed, and the interview took place before Wilson was removed.

    Some want of continuity in the story of the witnesses examined was explained by the fact that some were too ill to appear in the order originally outlined. The list of witnesses in the case totals forty-one, of which fourteen were examined during the morning.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Mercury, Fri 7 Apr 1899 63

QUEENSLAND.

Brisbane, Thursday.

    At the Ipswich Police Court to-day ELC Wilson, who was arrested in West Australia, formally charged with the wilful murder of the boy Hill at Oxley last November, was remanded.

    Mr J Stevens, managing director of the Brisbane Newspaper Co, and Mr Angus Gibson, a prominent sugar grower, have been appointed members of the Legislative Council.

    The south-western portion of the colony is in a very bad state for want of rain.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 7 Apr 1899 64

QUEENSLAND.
———◦———
THE OXLEY TRAGEDY.
———
TRIAL OF WILSON.
———

Brisbane, Thursday.

    The charge against the man Wilson of having murdered a boy at Oxley was continued to-day. Prisoner was defended by Mr R McGill, who defended him at Ipswich. Sixteen witnesses were examined. The evidence showed that Wilson’s departure from Ipswich was on the morning of December 10. He had sent his goods on to the Central railway station, Brisbane, on the previous day. His course was traced to Goodna by the evidence of the licensees of the various hotels at which he stopped. At four separate hotels from the time he left Ipswich until 4 o’clock in the afternoon he had a bottle of beer at each. Two witnesses from Bathurst, NSW, gave evidence as to Wilson possessing a revolver while employed as a master at All Saints’ College. Defendant was remanded for a week. There are still 25 witnesses to be examined.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Fri 7 Apr 1899 65

THE OXLEY TRAGEDY.
———◦———

Brisbane, April 5.

    The man Wilson was charged at the Police Court to-day with the wilful murder of the boy Hill, at Oxley, in November last. Wilson asked that he might be taken to the spot where he is alleged to have left his son and went into the bush. He said that in the interests of the prosecution his boy had been taken there, and he asked that he might also be allowed to go. He further stated that he intended to apply to the Crown for someone to defend him. He was remanded till to-morrow.

Brisbane, April 6.

    In connection with the trial of Wilson sixteen witnesses were examined to-day. The evidence showed that Wilson’s departure from Ipswich was made on the morning of December 10, and that he had on the previous day sent some goods on to the Central Station in Brisbane. His course was traced to Goodna by the evidence of licensees of various hotels at which he had stopped. Two witnesses from Bathurst gave evidence as to Wilson having possessed a revolver while employed at All Saints’ College there. The accused was remanded for a week. There are still fifteen witnesses to be examined.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Mercury, Mon 10 Apr 1899 66

QUEENSLAND.

Brisbane, April 6.

    In connection with the trial of ELC Wilson on the charge of having murdered the boy Hill at Oxley, 16 witnesses were examined to-day.

    The evidence showed that Wilson left Ipswich on the morning of December 10, after he had on the previous day sent goods on to the central station, Brisbane. His course was traced to Goodna by the evidence of the licensees of various hotels at which he stopped. He had a bottle of beer at each of the four hotels at which he stopped between the time he left Ipswich and 4 o’clock in the afternoon.

    Two witnesses from Bathurst (New South Wales), gave evidence as to Wilson possessing a revolver while employed as a master at All Saints’ College there.

    The accused was remanded for a week. There are still 25 witnesses to be examined.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Fri 14 Apr 1899 67

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———○———
ELC WILSON BEFORE THE COURT.
———
A FURTHER REMAND.
———

    The man ELC Wilson, aged 49, was brought up at the South Brisbane Police Court yesterday, charged, on remand, with the wilful murder of the boy Alfred S Hill at Oxley on the 10th of December last. Sergeant Shanahan prosecuted, and Mr WJ Blair (instructed by Mr R McGill, of Ipswich) appeared on behalf of the defendant. A large number of person occupied the public gallery, including several females. The bench was occupied by Mr W Yaldwyn, PM, and Mr JC Rumpf, JP.

    The first witness called was Thomas [Tindale] Makepeace, residing at Moggill, who stated that on the 10th of December last he saw the defendant on the Ipswich-road, near Stafford-road, about three miles from Ipswich, at about 2.10 or 2.20 pm. The defendant spoke to witness, who took him on his cart at Bottomley’s butcher’s shop. Witness conveyed him to Redbank Railway Station. Defendant’s son was with him, in a little cart, like the one produced in court. When defendant got off at Redbank he did not notice in what direction he went.

    James Bielby, the son of a farmer named William Bielby, living at Woolston, deposed that he saw defendant passing his father’s house about 5.20 pm on the 10th of December last. The defendant was going towards Brisbane, and was accompanied by a boy in a cart. His father’s house was about as far away from the road as the width of the road.

    Agnes Bielby, mother of the previous witness, corroborated the evidence of her son. She stated that defendant was going towards Oxley when she saw him.

    The lad Claude Wilson was then carried into court and placed on a chair. He stated that he remembered Saturday the 10th December last. On that day he left Ipswich. He was in a cart, which was drawn by a goat. A boy named Guy Betts was with him as far as Bundamba. His father met them at Limestone Hill, outside the Girls’ Grammar School. When they reached the Prince Alfred Hotel his father went in, and Guy Betts waited outside. He did not remember anything being given to him there. When they reached the Racecourse Hotel his father went in and stayed there about five minutes. He then came out, and they went on to Bundamba. Guy Betts went as far as Bundamba church with them. His father and witness went up to the church, and Guy Betts went to buy some fruit. They were about half-an-hour there. They afterwards met Guy Betts near the end of a fence on the left-hand side of the church. The goat was there unharnessed, and Guy Betts took it back to Ipswich. His father then wheeled the cart on, with witness in it. They next met Mr Makepeace, who was in a cart. While Mr Makepeace’s cart was outside of a butcher’s shop his father asked Mr Makepeace’s boy to give them a ride. Mr Makepeace afterwards came out, and they got a ride in the cart. They went in the cart as far as the Redbank railway gates, where they got out, and his father wheeled him (witness) on to Mrs Simpson’s Hotel. His father went in to the hotel, leaving witness outside in the cart. They afterwards went on to Mrs Coleman’s Hotel at Goodna. His father went into the hotel, leaving him (witness) on the veranda, but afterwards coming out and taking him in, and giving him a drink of something, and some bread and jam. They then went out, and journeyed towards Oxley. Witness knew a place like a quarry between Goodna and Oxley. There was a slope from the quarry towards Oxley. As they were going down the hill they met a boy on a piebald pony. The boy passed them on the left-hand side, going towards Ipswich. The pony was walking up the hill. After the boy on the pony passed them his father wheeled him back a few yards towards Ipswich. His father left him then on the side of the road, and went into the bush, going in the direction of Ipswich. Witness lost sight of him. When he lost sight of his father the boy on the pony was at the top of the hill, near the end of the quarry. Afterwards he (witness) heard the report of a revolver or pistol. After a short time his father came back again, and asked him if he was all right. Witness said “Yes.” His father then asked him if he thought he had been away a long time, and told him that he had shot a hawk on the wing. He also told witness not to say anything about it. They then went on to Oxley. Before reaching Oxley they met a man and a woman in a cart. They met a swagman after. They also met a man on a horse. That was on the Ipswich side of the quarry. He (witness) thought that the time his father was away from him was about twenty minutes. After meeting the swagman, his father passed him (the swagman) something. His father spoke to the swagman, but witness did not hear what was said. When his father left him on the road, he went into the bush on the right-hand side going to Ipswich, and left-hand side going towards Oxley. After leaving the swagman his father went towards Oxley, and called in at a house on the way and asked where the Oxley Hotel was. It was rather dark at the time. They then went on to the Oxley Hotel. They had tea there, and after tea his father put him to bed. There were two beds in the room they slept in—small beds. He did not see his father go to bed, nor did he see him get up. His father called him in the morning, and was dressed at the time. They left the hotel after breakfast, and his father wheeled him to Corinda, leaving him outside the railway station. His father went in, coming out afterwards and wheeling him on to Brisbane. On the way they crossed a big red bridge. When they got to Brisbane they went to the Exchange Hotel, where his father asked if they had any rooms. His father was told that all the rooms were full up. They then went to a hotel which had a name something like Metropolitan. His father left him there, and went out, but did not say where he was going, nor was he (witness) told. His father subsequently came back with his luggage, which he had caused to be sent by train. His father took him upstairs. They slept at the hotel that night. The next morning his father changed his shirt and rolled it up in brown paper, saying that he was going to take it to be washed. He then took the shirt away with him. When he came back he told witness that he had sold his revolver for £1. Witness first saw the revolver at Ipswich, at Mr Walker’s place, where his father was boarding, in his father’s room. His father showed him the revolver when he was packing up his things. His father took it up, and witness asked him what it was, and his father told him it was a kind of pistol. He asked his father to show him how to load it, and his father showed him. There was a piece of iron which he opened at the side, and a round thing with holes in it in which the cartridges were placed. His father then put the revolver back in a leather case, and into a black trunk. He saw the cartridges in a cardboard box. A cartridge was like a round piece of tin blocked up at one end, and a round piece of lead at the other. Before they left Ipswich on the 10th his father said he was going to Southport. They did not go to Southport when they left Brisbane; they went to Melbourne, where they stopped at the West Bourke Hotel, and also at Mrs Evans’s Temperance Hotel. When they were leaving Melbourne his father told him to say, if any one asked where they were going, that they were going up the country. Asked if he noticed anything in the hand of the boy on the piebald pony they saw near Oxley, he said he saw a riding whip in his hands. He also said that the boy had on a pair of light brown or gray tweed trousers.

    By Mr Blair: He came back from Albany, West Australia, with his father, and Sergeant Fahey, Mr Wyer, and Sergeant Gaffney. He was kept separate from his father. He did not ask to see his father on the way back. (Witness here commenced to cry.) Since he left Albany he had not been alone with his father. He had not asked to see his father, and did not know whether his father wished to see him. Sergeant Fahey left him at Ipswich. Mr Wyer took him to Mr Crawford’s place, near the lockup in Brisbane. Witness first met Sergeant Shanahan on the Peregrine, in the Brisbane River. Sergeant Shanahan went with him to Ipswich. He did not know what he (Shanahan) was, but he knew he was connected with the police. At the Commissioner’s office he was shown a revolver by Sergeant Shanahan. He was 11 years old, and could read. He read the newspapers, but not now, because they were kept away from him. The last time he saw a newspaper was the first or second day that he was at Mr Crawford’s. He went along the road from Ipswich to Brisbane, in company with Sergeant Shanahan, Mr Wyer, and another man, about a week after he came back in the Peregrine. He knew that he was taken over the road for the purpose of showing where they met the boy on the piebald pony. He told Sergeant Fahey and Mr Wyer on the boat that they had met a boy on a piebald pony. On the way over he was asked about the boy on the pony, and something was said about a revolver. He had not seen the boy that was on the piebald pony since. He did not know that a boy had been found shot at Oxley. He did not know why his father was at the court that day. He knew what murder was—it was killing any one. He was told what he was going to do at the court that day. He was not told that his father was accused of killing the boy at Oxley. He saw something in the newspapers the first or second day after he came back from Brisbane. He did not remember any one saying anything to him about the evidence he had given. He was not shown any writing or papers about the matter. Last Saturday he was taken over the road from Ipswich to Brisbane. His father had often shared the same bed with him, and he had often seen him change his clothes. He first saw a revolver at Ipswich, and the next time was at the Commissioner’s office. The revolver he saw at the Commissioner’s office he had not seen before. He knew now that his father was accused of murdering the boy at Oxley. He did not remember what day it was when his father showed him the revolver, but it was some little time before they left Ipswich—a day or two. His father was then living at Mr Walker’s, and he (witness) was living at Mr Betts’s. When coming over from Western Australia he understood he would not be allowed to see his father, because he was kept away by the policeman who brought him over. The day he saw the cartridges at Walker’s he was at Walker’s for about an hour. He did not think there was any one present except his father and himself. He noticed the quarry between Goodna and Oxley the first time he came down from Ipswich. From the time his father came out of the bush to the time he reached the Oxley Hotel, about half-an-hour passed. He thought the distance between the place where his father came out of the bush to the Oxley Hotel was about a quarter of a mile.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: He first told the police at Albany that his father had a revolver. That was in consequence of being asked to tell all that happened while he was coming down from Ipswich. He told about the boy and the piebald pony, and the revolver, long before he came to Brisbane. He was cautioned to tell the truth. Of his own free will, and without any suggestion, he showed Sergeant Shanahan, Mr Wyer, and another man some places along the road between Ipswich and Brisbane, where he was driven along the road. The little goat-cart was not taken with them the first time. The conveyance he was in went, on the first occasions, to the Redbank crossing. The second time—last Saturday—he was taken as far as Limestone Hill. He was then taken from the conveyance and placed in his cart, which was wheeled along certain portions of the road. When he was taken to the Commissioner’s office he saw a lot of revolvers there, and picked out the size of the revolver his father had possessed. He received no suggestions from any one.

    Mr Blair here stated that at the prisoner’s request he asked that Wilson might see his son. He had not seen him for four months. Mr Yaldwyn said that Wilson would be allowed to see his son, of course, in some one’s presence.

    Noah Wood, a dairy farmer, residing at Oxley, deposed to seeing the defendant on the evening of the 10th of December last, at his house, at 7.30 o’clock. Defendant asked the way to the Oxley Hotel, and witness directed him.

    Paul HC Rumpf, licensee of the Oxley Hotel, stated that about 8 o’clock defendant came to his hotel and asked for accommodation. He was alone at the time, but witness afterwards saw him with a boy in a goat-cart. Defendant and his boy had tea at the hotel. Subsequently defendant took the boy to the bedroom he had obtained, which was on a level with the ground, and facing towards Goodna. It would be possible for a person to leave the hotel during the night without disturbing the inmates. Witness did not see defendant after he took the boy to the bedroom until the next morning.

    Annie Rumpf gave evidence of a corroborative nature. She also stated her attention was drawn, on the morning of the 11th, to the two beds which were in the room Wilson had taken the boy into. One of the beds only had been used. Wilson, when he left, said he was going to Southport, and went towards Corinda. When witness asked defendant how far he had come he said, “From Redbank.” The little boy, at the time this was said, interjected that they had come from Ipswich; but defendant checked him, saying again that they had come from Redbank. The crippled boy was not left alone during the time witness saw him at the hotel.

    By Mr Blair: She did not remember the defendant saying he had got a lift to Redbank at the time he checked the boy for saying they had come from Ipswich.

    Florence Harrison, a married woman, residing at Rocklea, stated that she was employed at the Oxley Hotel on the 10th December last, and saw the defendant in the dining-room of the hotel about 8 o’clock. She prepared the tea for defendant, who appeared very hasty in temper. When she gave him the tea, defendant said, “This tea will not do me; when a man has been travelling a long way he wants good tea.” Witness put more tea in the pot. When she brought it to him he told her to leave it on the table, as he could help himself. She gave corroborative evidence as to one bed appearing next day as though it had not been used.

    At this stage the defendant was remanded till Monday, the 17th instant.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 15 Apr 1899 68

THE OXLEY TRAGEDY.
———◦———
CHARGE OF MURDER.

    At the South Brisbane Police Court on Wednesday last ELC Wilson was charged, before Mr W Yaldwyn, PM, with the wilful murder of a lad named Hill, at Oxley on the 10th December last. Sergeant Shanahan prosecuted.

    Constable Auld deposed to arresting the accused that morning about 9 o’clock at her Majesty’s prison. He read the warrant to accused, who made no reply. He produced the warrant.

    The accused was asked by the bench if he wished to ask the witness any question, and replied in the negative.

    Sergeant Shanahan made application for a remand till the following day, which was granted.

    At this stage the accused, who was about to be removed, said that he desired to make a request, which was that he should be taken to the place where his son said he left the road between Goodna and Oxley. He understood his son had been taken there in the interests of the prosecution, and in the interests of justice he asked to be allowed the same privilege.

    Sergeant Shanahan said a wire would be sent to defendant’s solicitor (Mr McGill) at Ipswich, and he thought the accused would be defended.

    Wilson said Mr McGill was not taking up this case. He intended to ask the Crown for legal assistance.

    Mr Yaldwyn said that no doubt the accused’s request would be attended to. The accused then asked to whom he should apply. Mr Yaldwyn said he did not know.

    Sergeant Shanahan said that the matter would be attended to. The requests made by defendant were rather premature.

    The accused was then taken from the court.

    Wilson presented a calm demeanour while in court, and spoke in a clear tone of voice.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Tue 18 Apr 1899 69

QUEENSLAND.
———○———
(From Our Own Correspondents.)
———


    The Circuit Court will open here tomorrow morning before Mr Justice [Charles Edward] Chubb. The cases set down for hearing are:—ELC Wilson, for a serious offence; and Edgar Wallace, alias Gould, bigamy—committed for sentence from Esk.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Wed 19 Apr 1899 70

The Brisbane Courier.
————————


    Cloudy weather, with rain, is anticipated by Mr Wragge on various parts of the Pacific coast. Some precipitation, he thinks, is not unlikely before long in the inland districts.

    About one-third of an inch of rain was registered in the neighbourhood of Brisbane yesterday during twelve hours ended at 9 pm.

    At the Circuit Court, Ipswich, yesterday, ELC Wilson was found guilty of an attempt to commit the offence with which he has been charged, and was sentenced to seven years’ imprisonment.

IPSWICH CIRCUIT COURT.
———○———
THE WILSON CASE.
———
PRISONER SENTENCED TO SEVEN
YEARS.
———

    The sittings of the Circuit Court were held here to-day (writes our Ipswich correspondent under yesterday’s date), before his Honour Mr Justice Chubb, Mr JJ Kingsbury prosecuted (instructed by Mr AI Cooling, of the Crown Law Offices). The first case heard was that of ELC Wilson, who was charged with having, on the 18th November last, committed an unnatural offence upon a lad 13 years of age, and son of a well-known Ipswich citizen. Mr JW Blair (instructed by Mr Robert McGill) appeared to defend the prisoner. Great interest was excited by the proceedings, and the court was crowded all day. Boys were refused admission, by order of the court. The prisoner appeared clean shaven, and, although dejected-looking, he manifested a keen interest in the proceedings, and listened attentively to the evidence of the witnesses. He several times leaned across the rail of the dock and attracted the attention of his solicitor, with whom he then eagerly conversed. After the jury had been empanelled, Acting Police Sergeant George Fay deposed to have arrested the prisoner at Albany, Western Australia, on the 23rd January last. In cross-examination by Mr Blair, he said that the warrant upon the strength of which the prisoner was arrested stated that the offence was committed on or about the 28th October, 1898.

    The lad whose father had laid the information was the principal witness, and his evidence was upon the lines of that given in the Police Court. Mr Kingsbury was endeavouring to elicit from the witness some information respecting an alleged indecency said to have been committed by the prisoner about the end of October last, but Mr Blair objected on the ground of irrelevancy. His Honour eventually ruled that all evidence relating to acts of indecency said to have taken place prior to the 8th November was inadmissible. The lad, being under 14 years of age, could not be a consenting party. In cross-examination by Mr Blair, the witness said that he was not sure of the date on which prisoner committed the offence.

    Mr Blair very ably addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner, his speech lasting for three-quarters of an hour. He submitted that the evidence was not sufficiently strong to warrant a verdict of guilty being returned.
His Honour, in directing the jury, pointed out that the case was one that must be clearly proven before an adverse verdict should be returned. His summing-up—which was not favourable to the prisoner—lasted for exactly half-an-hour, and during that time there was intense silence in the court. The prisoner remained calm, and listened intently to every word spoken by his Honour.

    The jury retired at 5.50 pm to consider their verdict. They returned into court at 12 minutes past 8 o’clock, and the foreman agreed upon a verdict of guilty of an attempt to commit an offence.

    His Honour: Are there any other charges?

    Mr Kingsbury: There are three others.

    His Honour: Do you propose to go on with them?

    Mr Kingsbury: We do not, your Honour.

    His Honour: Are you filing the informations?

    Mr Kingsbury: We will file them. Mr Kingsbury then presented two informations for an offence and one for an attempted offence, and with regard to the three the Crown entered a nolle prosequi.

    Mr Blair referred to testimonials that the prisoner had received since the year 1889, one of them being from the Chief Justice of South Australia. He said that the prisoner asked for leniency, on the ground of consideration for his crippled boy, who was dependent upon him for sustenance.
His Honour, in pronouncing sentence, said that the jury had taken a merciful view of the offence. He (his Honour) had no doubt in his mind that the principal offence had been committed. But the jury had taken a more lenient view, and found the prisoner guilty of an attempt, in itself a very serious crime, and one characterised by the law as abominable and unnatural. After some further remarks as to the gravity of the offence, his Honour said that he would not be doing his duty unless he passed a severe sentence. The offence was not one to be condoned in any way, and mercy, in his opinion, would be misplaced if shown in such a case. He did not wish to harass the prisoner’s feelings by any further remarks, under the painful circumstances. The sentence was seven years’ penal servitude.

    The prisoner, who looked very haggard, was then removed from the court.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Thu 20 Apr 1899 71

QUEENSLAND.
———

Brisbane, Wednesday.

THE CHARGES AGAINST
ELC WILSON.

    ELC Wilson, who was charged with having committed an offence with a number of boys at Ipswich in October last, was yesterday found guilty of an attempt to commit the offence. Mr Justice Chubb, in sentencing the prisoner, said that he had no doubt himself Wilson actually committed the crime with which he stood charged, but the jury had taken a lenient view of the case. He considered it necessary to inflict a sever penalty, owing to the nature of the offence. He therefore sentenced him to seven years’ imprisonment, with hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 20 Apr 1899 72

QUEENSLAND.
———◦———
THE RECENT HURRICANE.
____

Brisbane, Wednesday.

    In accordance with the desire of the Government to reward the northern blacks for the assistance they rendered to the survivors of the recent hurricane, Dr Roth, the official protector of the aboriginals at Cooktown, proceeded north with stores of flour, axes, clothing, and tobacco, recently despatched from Brisbane, and has visited a large number of places. The natives are extremely gratified to receive the reward. Dr Roth has furnished a lengthy report giving full details of his mission, and concludes his account by remarking—“There is no doubt my trip round this coast district and the relief accorded to some couple of hundred natives will have a most beneficial effect, not only showing these blacks that their assistance during the late hurricane is fully appreciated, but that the Government intends doing all it can for their future welfare and happiness.” Dr Roth ascertained that about 145 dead bodies were buried lately by the natives between Capes Bathurst and Melville.

———
THE CHARGES AGAINST ELC
WILSON.
——

    ELC Wilson, charged with having committed a criminal offence at Ipswich, in October last, was yesterday found guilty of an attempt to commit an offence. Mr Justice Chubb, in sentencing the prisoner, said he had no doubt himself that Wilson actually committed the crime with which he stood charged, but the jury had taken a lenient view of the case. He considered it necessary to inflict a severe penalty, owing to the nature of the offence. He therefore sentenced him to seven years’ hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The West Australian, Thu 20 Apr 1899 73

THE IPSWICH CASE.
———◦———
WILSON SENTENCES.
———

Brisbane, April 19.

    ELC Wilson, charged with having committed an offence on a number of boys at Ipswich in October last, was yesterday found guilty of an attempt to commit an offence. Mr Justice Chubb, in sentencing the prisoner, said that he had no doubt himself that Wilson had committed the crime, but the jury had taken a lenient view. Owing to the nature of the offence, he sentenced him to seven years’ hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 22 Apr 1899 74

THE WILSON CASE.
————
PRISONER SENTENCED TO
SEVEN YEARS.

    The sittings of the Circuit Court were held in Ipswich on Tuesday, before his Honour Mr Justice Chubb. Mr JJ Kingsbury prosecuted (instructed by Mr AJ Cooling, of the Crown Law Office). The first case heard was that of ELC Wilson, who was charged with having, on the 18th November last, committed an unnatural offence upon a lad 13 years of age, and son of a well-known Ipswich citizen. Mr JW Blair (instructed by Mr Robert McGill) appeared to defend the prisoner. Great interested was excited by the proceedings, and the court was crowded all day. Boys were refused admission, by order of the court. The prisoner appeared clean shaven, and, although dejected-looking, he manifested a keen interest in the proceedings, and listened attentively to the evidence of the witnesses. He several times leaned across the rail of the dock and attracted the attention of his solicitor, with whom he then eagerly conversed. After the jury had been empanelled, Acting Police Sergeant George Fay deposed to having arrested the prisoner at Albany, Western Australia, on the 23rd January last. In cross-examination by Mr Blair, he said that the warrant upon the strength of which the prisoner was arrested stated that the offence was committed on or about the 28th October, 1898.

    The lad whose father had laid the information was the principal witness, and his evidence was upon the lines of that given in the Police Court. Mr Kingsbury was endeavouring to elicit from the witness some information respecting an alleged indecency said to have been committed by the prisoner about the end of October last, but Mr Blair objected on the ground of irrelevancy. His Honour eventually ruled that all evidence relating to acts of indecency said to have taken place prior to the 8th November was inadmissible. The lad, being under 14 years of age, could not be a consenting party. In cross-examination by Mr Blair, the witness said that he was not sure of the date on which prisoner committed the offence.

    Mr Blair very ably addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner, his speech lasting for three-quarters of an hour. He submitted hat the evidence was not sufficiently strong to warrant a verdict of guilty being returned.
His Honour, in directing the jury, pointed out that the case was one that must be clearly proven before an adverse verdict should be returned. His summing-up—which was not favourable to the prisoner—lasted for exactly half-an-hour, and during that time there was intense silence in the court. The prisoner remained calm, and listened intently to every work spoken by his Honour.

    The jury retired at 5.50 pm to consider their verdict. They returned into court at 12 minutes past 8 o’clock, and the foreman (Mr MJ Real) announced that they had agreed upon a verdict of guilty of an attempt to commit an offence.
His Honour, in pronouncing sentence, said that the jury had taken a merciful view of the offence. He (his Honour) had no doubt in his mind that the principal offence had been committed. But the jury had taken a more lenient view, and found the prisoner guilty of an attempt. In itself a very serious crime, and one characterised by the law as abominable and unnatural. After some further remarks as to the gravity of the offence, his Honour said he would not be doing his duty unless he passed a severe sentence. The offence was one not to be condoned in any way, and mercy, in his opinion, would be misplaced if shown in such a case. He did not wish to harass the prisoner’s feelings by any further remarks, under the painful circumstances. The sentence was seven years’ penal servitude.

    The prisoner, who looked very haggard, was then removed from the court.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Barrier Miner, Tue 25 Apr 1899 75

THE EARLY DAYS OF ELC WILSON.
———◦———
(By Telegraph.)
———

Sydney, Tuesday.

    A Sydney gentlemen writes to the Brisbane Press stating that he has known the family of ELC Wilson since his boyhood. He went to school and to Cambridge, he says, with Wilson. An ancestor of Wilson’s, apparently his grandfather, was the clergyman so bitterly satirised by Charlotte Bronte in her novel, “Jane Eyre.” The writer says he is using his knowledge and influence, through his brother, who holds a position in Westmoreland, where the Wilsons live, to induce them to provide for the prisoner’s crippled son.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Wed 26 Apr 1899 76

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———○———
WILSON AGAIN BEFORE THE COURT.
———
FURTHER EVIDENCE.
———

    At the South Brisbane Police Court yesterday before Mr W Yaldwyn, PM and Messrs T Austin and FH Swanwick, JJP, ELC Wilson appeared on remand, charged with the wilful murder of the boy Alfred Stephen Hill at Oxley on the 10th of December last. Sergeant Shanahan prosecuted, and Mr JW Blair (instructed by Mr R McGill, of Ipswich) appeared for the defendant.

    There were a number of the public in the gallery, and the front seat was almost entirely occupied by women.

    Dr Wray, Government medical officer, deposed than on the 7th of January last, in the afternoon, he journeyed with Chief Inspector Stuart along Ipswich-road to a spot some distance past the Oxley Hotel. They went into the bush on the right-hand side of the road about a quarter of a mile. He there saw a heap of branches, and discovered that underneath them were the remains of a youth. The body was very much decomposed. There was a bullet wound in the skull. The bullet had been fired from behind, and the wound inflicted by it would have caused death. The youth would have been dead about three or four weeks. He saw the body placed in a shell. On the next day he made a post-mortem of the body at the morgue. A constable took possession of the clothing found on the body. Dr Wray here produced the skull of the lad Hill, and pointed out two holes made by the bullet, and also that the skull was cracked.

    By Mr Blair: The boughs were covering the body when it was found, and they were not recently cut. He walked to the spot where the body was found. There was no defined track leading there.

    Mr Blair applied for and obtained leave for the defendant to sit down.

    Walter Bowler, a blacksmith, living at Fairfield, deposed that on the 10th of December last he was at his father’s house at Oxley. He left between 6 and 6.30 pm. In a buggy, accompanied by his wife and two children. There was a sewing machine in the buggy. He drove towards Ipswich. While on the road between Oxley and Goodna he met the defendant about a mile and a half on the Goodna side of the Oxley Hotel. It was in the vicinity of the quarry on the roadside that he met the defendant. It took him about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes to drive from his father’s house to where he met defendant, who was drawing a boy in a cart, and going in the direction of Oxley. He did not pass a boy on a skewbald or piebald pony between there and Goodna.

    Cross-examination by Mr Blair: His father’s place was only a few chains away from the Oxley Hotel. He drove very slowly. He did not see anyone on the road between his father’s house and where he met the defendant. He passed the Oxley Hotel between 6 and half-past. There was a good light at the time—the sun was not down. He did not at any time tell any one that he left his father’s house about 6 o’clock. He first mentioned the time he left his father’s place to Sergeant Shanahan, about a week or two, he thought, after the body was found. On the day the body was found Sergeant Small asked him when he left the house, but he said he could not say for certain, as he would have to get time to think. He did not call at the Oxley Hotel.

    Maria Catchpole, a widow, living at Oxley, near the Oxley Hotel, on the Brisbane side, deposed that on the 10th of December last, in the evening, the deceased boy, Alfred Stephen Hill, called at her place. The boy was mounted on a piebald—red and white— pony. He just came up on the veranda to the door and she had a conversation with him. He delivered a note to her. She had tried subsequently to find the note, but could not. The note was addressed to her son, William Catchpole. The boy Hill stopped about ten minutes at her place, when he left, going up the Ipswich-road towards Goodna. She could not say for certain what time it was, but she thought it was about 5.30 pm when the boy arrived.

    By Mr Blair: She had spoken to other people about the time, and told them that it was something between 5 and half-past, but nearer half-past. She had always adhered to that statement. She saw the boy ride up to her house. The horse was walking. The boy had not gone many yards away, when he left, before she lost sight of him—and he was then the width of the station road and an allotment from the hotel.

    Alfred Lawton, a storekeeper, residing at Oxley, near the hotel, deposed that he was at the rear of his premises on the evening of the 10th December last, whence he could see part of the Ipswich-road on the Ipswich side of the hotel. He remembered seeing a boy on a brown and white pony. The boy had a straw hat, and was wearing a light suit of clothes. The boy was distant about 100 yards from witness at the time he saw him, and was lying across the saddle, the pony grazing at the side of the road. The sun was very low at the time. He would say it was about 6 o’clock, or perhaps a little after. He saw the boy rise up in his saddle and look back towards the hotel. He saw the boy for about five minutes.

    By Mr Blair: From inquiries he had made, he had come to the conclusion that it must have been quite 6 o’clock when he saw the boy. When the boy was found dead he was asked when and where he had seen him. The police asked him. He made two statements, at the interval of about a week, both, he thought, to the police. He was not informed that his first statement was wrong. There was a mistake as to time in the first statement. He had first said that the time was between 5.30 and 6, but he knew now that it was later. He might have said from 5 to 6—it was between that time. It was quite light enough for him to see the colour of the boy’s clothes. He had never heard what colour the clothes were that were on the body when it was found. He had seen piebald horses passing but seldom. He had never seen boys passing on piebald ponies before he saw the boy he described. He had never heard any one mention that the boy had a straw hat. He might have read it in the newspapers—but he did not recollect doing so.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: The police had never made any suggestions to him as to what he should say. He was under no compliment to the police. There had been no assistance or hints given directly or indirectly by the police to witness with regard to the time. Mr Bridges, MLA, had had a conversation with witness after the first statement was made, but he could not say who took the second statement. He recollected Sergeant Shanahan being present, with Constable Auld, when he made the first statement.

    William Grieve, a farmer, residing at Redbank Plains, stated that the deceased boy, AS Hill, was his nephew. On the 6th of December last he received a letter from the deceased’s father. In consequence of that letter he was on the lookout for the boy on the 10th of December, between 5 and 6 o’clock. The boy never arrived. The boy had previously visited him in June last, when he journeyed with his father in a buggy. Two years ago last Christmas the deceased had visited him for a week, and on that occasion he rode there alone. He had also been at witness’s place on one other occasion.

    Francis Fox, son of the station-master at Goodna, deposed to having attended the Ipswich Grammar School. He knew the defendant. On a day in or about December last he saw the defendant at Goodna. He knew the shape of a revolver. On the day referred to he saw in defendant’s right-hand trousers pocket the shape of a revolver. He (witness) was sitting close to defendant at the time. Witness had never seen a revolver in the defendant’s possession—only the “shape” referred to.

    By Mr Blair: The defendant was giving witness postage stamps at the time.

    Sophie Dahl, a single girl, residing with her mother at Darra, deposed that on the 10th of December last, in the afternoon, she was at the Darra Station.

    Sergeant Shanahan here asked the witness if she knew defendant. She answered that she did not.

    Sergeant Shanahan: Did that man call at Darra Railway Station on the 10th?

    Witness: No.

    Witness here produced a letter, which she stated had come into her possession by the guard of a train delivering it.

    Sergeant Shanahan tendered the letter. The following are the contents of the letter, dated 6th April, 1899, and written from HM Prison, Brisbane:—“To the station-mistress, Darra. Madam,—Will you kindly write to me by return of post to inform me if you remember a man coming to Darra Station on the evening of 10th December, 1898, and asking you if there was a train on to Oxley. The man was middle-aged, and wore a moustache; he had dark clothes, and a dark-straw hat. He probably said he had walked a long way, and was very tired. Also, do you remember that while he was talking to you, a pistol shot was fired in the bush, and did both (this word is underlined) of you remark it? When the man left you, did he go in the direction of the road to Oxley? I hope that in the interests of justice you will reply by first post. Your truly, EC Wilson. Please address to EC Wilson, HM Prison, Brisbane.”

    After witness received the letter, she said, Mr McGill called on her, and asked her certain questions. Continuing, in reply to Sergeant Shanahan, she stated that she did not hear any shots on the afternoon of the 10th. Her mother and her two sisters were with her at the station in the afternoon. No one else was there. If the accused had called at the station that day she would have seen him. She remembered the 10th, because they went away on their holidays the day after.

    Caroline Dahl, mother of the last witness and station-mistress at Darra, deposed that on the 10th of December last she left Darra in the morning, returned there at 4.45 pm, and again left for Brisbane by the 7 pm train. She was at the station from 4.45 pm to 7 pm. She did not know defendant (looking at him). Neither defendant nor any other man spoke to her about a train that afternoon, or said anything about two shots being fired. She heard no shots. She remembered the 10th, because on the 11th she left Darra for Stanthorpe.

    Caroline Dahl and Anna Dahl, daughters of last witness, gave corroborative evidence.

    Alfred Harris, residing at Redbank, stated that on the evening of the 10th he was at the Oxley Hotel, and saw Walter Bowler drive past in a buggy, with his family, towards Ipswich. That was about five or ten minutes past 6. Walter Bowler was his son-in-law.

    By Mr Blair: Sergeant Small first spoke to him about the time Bowler passed a day or so after the body of the lad Hill was found. He was giving the time to the best of his knowledge. He did not fix the time on the evening of the 10th. He did not tell anyone it might have been 5.15, 5.30, 5.45, or between 5 and 6. There was a bright light at the time. His son-in-law did not tell him what time he passed. He had a conversation with Bowler on several occasions, and the time might have been mentioned. He had not told anyone outside the court-house on the previous day that it would be impossible to tell the time within half-an-hour. He did not know the time himself only from his own recollections. His son-in-law’s horse was going at a jogtrot when he passed the hotel.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: When Bowler passed it was twilight. It was not night.

    James Rogers, a labourer, living at Goodna, stated that on the 10th of December last he was at the Rocklea races. When the races were over he stopped to a dance, and left when the public-house closed. It took him about three-quarters of an hour to go from Rocklea to the quarry on the Goodna side of the Oxley Hotel. He was about a-quarter or half-an-hour at the Oxley Hotel. It was about 11.30 to 11.45 pm when he left the Oxley Hotel. It would take him about ten or fifteen minutes to reach the quarry from Oxley. When he was about half-a-mile past the quarry he heard a shot. The sound seemed to come from the right-hand side of the road. A boy named David Lilley was with him at the time, and something was said about the shot.

    By Mr Blair: He had about six “shandies” during the day. The ball was held at the hotel. He was outside, not inside. Lilley was with him during the day, but only had “soft stuff” to drink as far as witness knew. He was outside the hotel when the doors were closed. He did not have tea till he got home. He had no drinks between the time the races were over till the Rocklea Hotel closed. He went to the Oxley Hotel on a horse, “double banking” behind Lilley. They stopped at the Oxley Hotel, as witness had left his horse there. He was not sure what time it was. One of the side doors was open. They went in, and witness had one drink—a “shandy.” Lilley had “soft stuff.” He had a distinct recollection of all that occurred. Witness went to the races to try and win something, and had good luck. The shot he heard he could not distinguish as a gunshot or any other shot. He was level with the road leading to Darra Station when he heard the shot.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: He clearly recollected hearing the shot.

    David Robert Lilley, a blacksmith, living at Goodna, corroborated the evidence of the last witness. He gave the time of leaving the Rocklea Hotel as about 11.45 pm on the evening of the 10th. He said the spot at which they heard the shot fired was somewhere between the quarry and Darra. The sound came from behind, but he could not say from which side of the road.

    By Mr Blair: Rogers had some liquor in him, but he could knock about. He was merry at the races, but appeared all right going home. The night was dull. It was some sort of shot from a gun that he heard. There were two other young fellows with Rogers and witness. He did not tell anyone about the shot till Constable Auld asked him about it. He never took much notice of the shot till Constable Auld asked him about it. Up that way shots could often be heard from persons ’possum-shooting. Constable Auld asked him if he heard a shot.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: Rogers was merry at Oxley, but appeared to have his senses. Rogers got his horse at the Oxley Hotel and rode it home. Witness did not drink intoxicating liquors. People did not go ’possum shooting, as far as witness knew, on dull nights. Witness could not say whether the shot he heard was a pistol, revolver, rifle, or gun shot.

    Thomas G Bridges, son of Mr T Bridges, MLA, deposed that on the 7th of January last he was with Chief Inspector Stuart and some of the police when the decomposed body of a red-and-white pony was found. Witness went some distance away from the pony, and found a heap of bushes, underneath which he could tell there was a body. The bushes covering the body were small, with the exception of one, larger than the others, on top. The bark on the larger branch showed that it had been cut some time. In his opinion the bush had been cut three months, at least. The other branches had been broken off, by their appearance—there was no sign they had been cut.

    By Mr Blair: He did not know who cut the large branch, or whether it was cut from a tree near the spot. He examined every branch as well as he could at the time. One or two might have been cut beside the large one, although he did not notice them. The place where the body was found was rather thickly timbered. He was only searching about half-an-hour altogether before he found the body, and about ten minutes after the horse was shown to him. He had not searched before that time. He was brought to where the horse was found by a policeman. The timber extended from where the body was found to the road, and pretty well all along the road from Oxley to where he turned off to go towards the spot where the body was found.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: There was a kind of gully leading up to where the body was found from a culvert on the Ipswich-road. There would have been no difficulty experienced by any person of average intelligence who knew where the body was in finding it again.

    At this stage the defendant was remanded until the 2nd May.

    Mr Blair said that, in justice to the accused, he asked that the case might be completed as soon as possible. He also asked that the first statement that Lawton was alleged to have made might be produced.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Fri 5 May 1899 77

OXLEY MURDER CASE.
———○———
THE CHARGE AGAINST WILSON.
———

    At the South Brisbane Police Court yesterday, before Mr W Yaldwyn, PM, ELC Wilson appeared, on remand, charged with the wilful murder of the boy, AS Hill, at Oxley, on the 10th of December last. Sergeant Shanahan prosecuted, and Mr JW Blair (instructed by Mr R McGill, of Ipswich) appeared for the defendant. There were a large number of spectators in the public gallery.

    John A McDonald, acting superintendent of HM Gaol, Brisbane, deposed that ELC Wilson was a confinee in the gaol on the 6th of April last. He had seen the defendant write. The letter shown him (written to the Darra station-mistress) was, to the best of his belief, in defendant’s handwriting. Witness passed the letter for transmission from the gaol. On the 5th of April defendant wrote a statement (produced).

    By Mr Blair: The statement was given to him by the prisoner. He did not know who told Wilson that he was about to be arrested. He (witness) believed that a conversation took place between Constable Auld and Wilson. The prisoner said to witness, when the written statement was given to witness, that perhaps he was doing wrong in making the statement then, and asked witness to keep it till he saw his solicitor. Witness locked it up in a drawer, and understood he was keeping it till Wilson had seen his solicitor. He did not know whether any solicitor had ever seen the statement, but a day or two after it was given to him he handed it over to the Comptroller-General of Prisons, upon receiving instructions to do so from the chief clerk (Mr Pearson) in the prisons’ office. Pearson told witness that Sergeant Shanahan wanted it. He presumed Sergeant Shanahan was informed by Constable Auld about the statement, but he did not know.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: Witness was subpoenaed.

    Sergeant Shanahan tendered the document as evidence.

    Mr Blair objected on the grounds that (1) it was a privileged communication, being a statement made by the prisoner for the use of his solicitor; and (2) that it was inadmissible at this stage till the constable who arrested the prisoner gives his versions of what transpired.

    Sergeant Shanahan pressed for the admission of the document.

    The document was admitted, the following is the statement:—“Brisbane, 5th April, 1899.—I Edward Litton Carns Wilson, regret that to the best of my belief, I unintentionally made a statement to the police at the South Brisbane Police Court in February last. I then stated that I did not leave the main road between Goodna and Oxley, and that I did not hear a pistol fired. But within the last day or so it has come to my recollection that I did leave the road at or close to Darra Station in order to inquire if there was any train on to Oxley. This would be shortly after 7 pm. While I was engaged in conversation with the station-mistress the report of a pistol was heard by both of us in the bush, and we both remarked it. I had every intention to state this fact to Sergeant Shanahan this week, and am doing so now in consequence of being informed that I am about to be arrested. [signed] ELC Wilson.”

    Witness, in answer to Sergeant Shanahan, said that Wilson asked Constable Auld to take down the statement in writing. Auld said his fingers were stiff, and Wilson offered to write himself. Witness knew a prisoner named Wakefield, who was a witness in this case, and who was produced on a Judge’s order. Defendant and Wakefield occupied the same portion of the prison yard for some days.

    By Mr Blair: The date of issue of his subpoena was the 28th of April. The letter was not in his possession at that date. He received it into his custody that morning from Sergeant Shanahan. The man Wakefield was in gaol, he thought, for false pretences over a cheque. Wakefield had been in gaol once before, but he could not say what for. Wakefield was in the “remand” yard with Wilson while the latter was awaiting trial. As far as witness knew, Wakefield had not seen Wilson since he was sentenced. Wakefield was now employed in the prison kitchen. That might be looked upon as a privilege. He was employed in the kitchen some time after he saw Wilson. It was not usual to put a man into the “first time” yard who had previously served a sentence.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: There was a regulation prohibiting two men being together in a yard. There must be one, or three, or more. It was in consequence of this that Wakefield was put in the same yard as Wilson and another prisoner. There was no other reason for putting Wakefield in the yard.

    Mary Ryan, housemaid at the Metropolitan Hotel, Edward-street, stated that early in December—about the 10th or 11th—the defendant went to the hotel. It was on a Sunday afternoon, and he left on the day following, about lunch time. Defendant did not give witness a shirt to wash for him, neither did he say anything to her about getting a shirt washed.

    Benjamin Ford, recalled and resworn, said that he drove from Ipswich to Brisbane on the 10th of December last. He recollected looking at his watch when he arrived at the Oxley Hotel. It was exactly 5 o’clock. Before arriving at Rocklea he met a boy on a piebald or skewbald pony. He passed the boy about three-quarters of a mile from Rocklea. It took him about twenty minutes to go from the Oxley Hotel to where he met the boy on the pony. The distance from the Oxley Hotel to where he passed the boy was about two or two and a-quarter miles. The boy had a straw hat on, and was journeying in the direction of Oxley at a walking pace. He (witness) had since driven over the road from the Oxley Hotel to where he met the boy in the same vehicle and with the same horse that he had previously, and it took him about twenty minutes. He could not recollect the colour of the boy’s clothes.

    By Mr Blair: Last Saturday afternoon he drove from the Oxley Hotel where he met the boy. His wife and five children were with him when he drove from Ipswich on the 10th of December. His wife and one child were with him last Saturday. Before he started from Ipswich he saw Constable Auld, but had no conversation with him, except that he said he wanted witness to go to court. He left Oxley about 4.30 and arrived at Rocklea at 5.15. He timed himself. It took him just about the same time last Saturday as it did on the 10th of December. He timed himself to satisfy himself that the times he gave previously were correct. He did this of his own accord, without suggestion. He remembered meeting two people between Goodna and Oxley on the 10th of December. They were both swagsmen. One of them he could recognise if he saw him. He had seen neither of them since. One of the swagsmen he met about half-an-hour’s drive from Goodna. That was at twenty minutes to 5. He met the other about six or eight minutes to 5—about a mile and a-half from Oxley—Goodna side. Both swagsmen were going towards Ipswich. The first swagsman was dressed in a dark gray suit of clothes and a felt hat. The second had a long sort of light coat on, and was wearing a white helmet. He met nobody else between Goodna and Oxley, nor did he remember meeting anyone in a buggy after passing Oxley.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: It was not uncommon to meet swagsmen on the Ipswich-road. The distance between the first swagsman and the boy on the pony would have been about five miles, and between the second swagsman and the boy over three miles.

    Thomas Shallcross, a labourer, residing at Oxley, deposed that he knew Alfred Lawton, a witness in this case. On the 10th of December last he was at the rear of Mr Lawton’s premises, speaking to him. The sun was then getting pretty low—it would be after 5 o’clock. He drew Mr Lawton’s attention to a skewbald pony with some one lying on the pony’s neck. The pony was about forty or fifty yards from the Oxley Hotel, on the Ipswich-road. He saw the person on the pony sit up, after drawing Lawton’s attention to the pony and saw that the rider was a boy. The sun was very red at the time. The boy had light pants on, the coat was darker then the pants, and he wore a straw hat. He saw the boy move off towards Ipswich. He was about eighty to 100 yards away from the pony. The colour of the pony was bay and white.

    By Mr Blair: He was first spoken to about the evidence yesterday. Both he and Mr Lawton had talked about the matter, but not since Lawton gave evidence. He had spoken to Mr Lawton about the case since Mr Lawton had given evidence, but Mr Lawton had not told him that he made two statements, or spoken to him about his (Lawton’s) evidence. A man named Allen, living at Oxley, had told him that Mr Lawton made two statements, and gave different times. No one asked him to fix the time, or give evidence that would fix the time. He had told several people that the could fix the time, but had not told the police. He had told Mr Bridges, MLA, on the day the body was found, the same statement that he was giving now. He did not say to Mr Lawton, “If they call me, I can fix the time.” Soon after the body was found he told Lawton about the times. He told him that it was between 6 and 6.30 when he saw the boy. He was quite sure it was not later than 6.30 when he saw the boy. He fixed the time by the sun and his work that afternoon. He was employed delivering goods then. The time when he saw the boy, he thought it would be about 6.15. There was nothing to prevent him seeing the boy distinctly. Lawton had to shade his eyes—he had bad eyesight.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: The conversation he had with Mr Lawton about the time was in the store some time ago, and was a general conversation. He had no wish to come to the court—he was subpoenaed. Constable Auld got the particulars of his evidence at the court that morning, and that was the only thing of the nature of a statement that the police had got from him.

    James J Wakefield, a prisoner in HM Gaol, stated that he first saw defendant in the “remand yard” at the Boggo-road Gaol on the 10th of March last. Wilson asked witness to do him a favour. Witness replied that he would if it lay in his power. Wilson asked him when he (witness) was going to court again, and received the answer, “In a fortnight.” Defendant asked witness if he would get bail, and witness said he thought he would. Wilson then said, “If you get bail, I’ll get you to do a favour for me.” Wilson then said that the favour was that he (witness) would go to Darra, see the station-mistress there, and ask her if he (Wilson) was not there on 10th December, inquiring what time the train left for Brisbane. Wilson told him to tell the station-mistress that it was between 6.45 and 7 o’clock when he was at Darra, and that the station-mistress told him (Wilson) that the last train had gone, and he was too late. Wilson asked witness to ask the station-mistress if she remembered what time it was when he was there, and to get it put down on paper, or write it himself. Wilson further told witness to tell the station-mistress that he had a little boy in a cart with him, and that if she did not remember it witness was to put it down on paper, and not let her see it. Wilson also said, “Whatever the station-mistress says, write it down; anything she does not remember, put it in yourself, but in reading it over to her, be careful not to mention to her what you have put in yourself. Don’t forget to put in that I was at the station, inquiring about the train, and had the boy with me.” witness asked Wilson was the boy at the station with him, and he replied, “No; I left him on the track; she (meaning the station-mistress) did not see the boy, but I want you particularly to put that in. If you thing [sic] of anything else in the meantime that will clear me, don’t forget to put it in. Get her to sign it, and be very careful that she does not see what you put in. If possible, try your utmost to get a witness to her signature. After you receive it I want you to send it to my solicitor in Ipswich, Mr McGill. Do not sign your own name to it, or let him know that it came from you. Sign a fictitious name—that will do. I’m expecting Mr McGill in a few days to see me. If he does not come I shall write him, and tell him to expect a business letter from a friend that I know. The reason I do not wish her (the station-mistress) to know what you have put is that it might upset the whole affair.” Witness said that Wilson instructed him to say that he was a solicitor’s clerk to the Darra station-mistress, and to say he was inquiring about the Oxley murder. Wilson said, “When she knows that, she’s sure to fix things up right.” Wilson also said that he had left all his property in Melbourne, and had pawned them, getting 30s, and that the Brisbane detectives had received them, but “the —— had to pay £5 for them.” Wilson also that [sic] to witness, “There’s one thing they didn’t get.” Witness asked him if it was any good, and Wilson replied, “Yes; it was the revolv—–” Witness finished the word, saying “revolver,” and asked Wilson if that was what he meant. Wilson replied, “Yes, that’s what I mean: I beat them on that point.” on the 3rd of April witness asked Wilson why his son said that he had fired two shots? Wilson said “Yes, he was quite right; since I was arrested, I was thinking over it, and the boy was near me when I fired.” Witness asked him could the boy see what he fired at? Witness replied, “No, he could not. I put him away about 100 yards behind some bushes.”

    By Mr Blair: There was nothing more said about the case. Witness was 34 years of age, and born in Brisbane, where he had lived all his life. He had been in trouble before—in 1897, for embezzling about £9 from one Harry Bauer, in Bundaberg. Witness served six months in Boggo-road Gaol. Witness was now serving a sentence of six months for embezzling a cheque for £2 from a Mrs Jones, of Clayfield. Witness was never before a court previous to 1897. Witness was a clerk and butcher. Witness worked for Mrs Jones last, and previously at Baynes Bros’ as a butcher. He left voluntarily. He was never dismissed from any place. He also worked for Bauer and a man named Skyring. He left Skyring’s voluntarily. None of his other employers had ever complained of him. Wilson and witness were by themselves is the “remand” yard when the conversation took place. Two other men were in the yard—one of them was there before witness was placed in the yard, and the other came into the yard three or four hours after. It was about dinner-time when he started talking to Wilson. Their conversation lasted about two hours. Witness did not know all about the Oxley murder before he went to gaol. He knew that a boy had been found. He picked up a paper in which there was account of a boy being found. He bought the paper. He did not read anything else about the Oxley murder afterwards. He thought it was in December when he read the paper. He heard that Wilson was accused of the murder before he went to gaol—that was about Christmas time. He was having a drink, and heard it talked about. He did not remember anyone except Wilson saying anything to him about the Oxley affair. What he had already stated was all he knew about the Oxley affair before he went to prison. In February he went to Sydney, coming back early in March. Between December and April he was in Brisbane, except for the Sydney trip and a trip to Sandgate. The warder was named Boyle who put him in the “remand” yard. No one spoke to him about conversing with Wilson. Witness first told Warder Ingerfield about the statement alleged to have been made to him by Wilson—the morning after the statement was made. The second conversation he told to Sergeant Shanahan. He (witness) told Wilson, with regard to doing the favour for him, that it all depended what it was. He considered, under the circumstances, that it was a favour to report the conversation next morning. He thought it was a correct thing to do from motives of conscience. He thought it was a conscientious thing to do what he did. He had never got statements from prisoners or repeated conversations before the police. He was given no particular work to do after the conversations had taken place—not till after he was sentenced, when he got work in the prison kitchen. He did not get better food there. He did not think the billet he was given was a privileged one. The first time he was in gaol he did clerking work. No one said anything to him about speaking to the defendant.

    At this stage the defendant was remanded till the 11th instant.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Fri 12 May 1899 78

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———○———
THE CHARGE AGAINST WILSON.
———

    ELC Wilson, on remand, charged with the wilful murder of the boy AS Hill at Oxley on the 10th December last, again appeared at the South Brisbane Police Court yesterday, before Mr W Yaldwyn, PM, and Messrs RH Smith and JH Trimble, JJP.

    Sergeant Shanahan conducted the prosecution, and Mr JW Blair (instructed by Mr R McGill, of Ipswich) appeared for the defendant. There were a large number of spectators in the public gallery.

     James J Wakefield, a prisoner in HM Gaol, in cross-examination, stated, further, that he first went to school at St James’s, Boundary-street, Brisbane, which he attended for about six years. He afterwards attended the Valley Primary School for about nine months. Witness subsequently attended the Christian Brothers’ School for three years. After leaving the Christian Brothers he did not attend school any more. He remained in Brisbane for about three years, and resided with his people, but did no work. Witness then went to work at the Co-operative Stores in Edward-street, Brisbane. He could not remember the manager’s name, but a man named Lynch was in charge of the office. Witness remained there for about nine months, and then left of his own accord. After a holiday of a few months he secured employment in the General Post Office. He was in the Brisbane office for about twelve months, and was then transferred to Normanton, where he remained for about three years. He was then transferred to Townsville, where he remained for about twelve months, and then resigned. He resigned, as he thought, to better himself; there was no other reason, and he was not aware of any complaint having been made against him. He had no position promised to him before he resigned, and he remained in Townsville a few months longer. He subsequently went to Charters Towers, but only remained there a week, when he returned to Brisbane. At the end of a fortnight he secured employment with a man named Harry Blaney, at West End. Witness remained with him for about twelve months, when Blaney sold out, and witness was told by the purchaser of the business that he would not be required. Witness was only out of work for a few days, and then secured employment with the Graziers’ Butchering Company, and remained with that firm for about two years. He left the Graziers to go to work for Mr Geo Skyring, at Bundaberg. Witness remained with him for about fifteen months, when he left and went to work with a Mr Watt, a butcher at Gladstone. Witness remained there for about ten months, and then returned to Bundaberg, where he drove a cab for a man named Thomas Machan for a fortnight. At the end of the fortnight witness went to work for a man named Harry Bauer, with whom he remained for two months. While in Bauer’s employ witness got into trouble over some cash. Witness was in charge of the cash, and he appropriated £9. Witness was tried in the Bundaberg District Court. He was defended by Dr Boone. Witness pleaded guilty, but did not ask for the advantage of the Probation Act . No witnesses were called to give evidence as to his previous good character. Witness did not wish any called. He was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment. After he came out of gaol he obtained work with Baynes Bros in Brisbane, and remained there for five or six months. After leaving Baynes Bros he was laid up for awhile, but when he got better he secured employment with a Mrs Jones, who carried on the business of a butcher. While employed there he got into trouble. He received a cheque for her which he did not give her. He got the cheque cashed at the Albion Hotel, and kept the money. He did not know a man named Pothecary, a baker at Bundaberg or Cordalba. He had never written a name other than his own for dishonest purposes. He had never written the name of Harry Bauer to any letter. Witness had never gone under any name other than his own at any time either in Brisbane or Sydney.

    At this stage the witness was asked to write the names of Harry Bauer and Patten, and also the sentence “As soon as I receive the money.” Mr Blair tendered the writing as an exhibit.

    Witness, continuing, said he never at any time sent any orders to Brisbane either for himself or anybody else. Neither did he while he was at Bundaberg get clothes in Brisbane either for himself or any other person. He never got into trouble in Sydney, and was never before the courts there. About ten months ago witness had an accident while being thrown off a tram while in the act of getting off. As a result he was laid up in the hospital for a few days. Witness first met Wilson in the prison on the 30th March last. To his knowledge he had never seen him before. Wilson spoke to witness first. They were at dinner in the prison-yard. Witness was sitting at the table opposite Wilson. A prisoner named South was the only other person present. A prisoner named Soden may have come into the yard; witness did not see him. The conversation witness had with Wilson took place after dinner, between 2 and 3 o’clock. South and another man were there in the yard. He did not think the other man was Soden. The conversation Wilson had with witness lasted about three hours altogether. On the 4th April witness was taken out of the yard. Before witness was taken out of the yard Wilson reminded him of the favour he promised to do. Witness told Wilson that he had repeated what he had told him to Warder Ingerfield. If any one said that witness told them of the conversation he had had with Wilson before the 3rd April it would be untrue. Witness was now working in the gaol kitchen, and he got exactly the same food as he did prior to the 3rd April. Witness would not swear that the billet he now had in the kitchen was not a privileged on. To the best of his belief it was not. With the exception of Sergeant Shanahan and Warder Ingerfield, witness had never spoken to any one else about the conversation he had with Wilson. Witness was not told to talk to Wilson about the Oxley murder. It was about a week or ten days after the conversation witness had with Wilson that he first saw Sergeant Shanahan. He did not tell Shanahan as much of the conversation as he had repeated in court. Sergeant Shanahan took a statement from witness.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: He never at any time had any conversation with the police about the Oxley tragedy before Wilson made the statement to him. He had no reason for making the statement against Wilson other than a desire to tell the truth. He had no animus against the prisoner, and had never had any inducement or promise held out by the police to make this statement. No one had ever told him that it was desirable to speak to Wilson with a view to getting information from him. Witness could not swear to the exact date on which Soden entered remand yard at the gaol in which witness was with the prisoner.

    Ernest Bielby deposed that he was the son of William Bielby, who resided at Woolston. He thought he remembered seeing the defendant on a Thursday in December last on the Ipswich-road, coming down from Goodna. It was about two weeks before Christmas when he saw the prisoner, who was pushing a handcart along, in which was seated a little boy. Witness lived alongside the Woolston Railway Station, and knew the road from there to the Ipswich-road. It was on the Goodna side he first saw the prisoner, and at the time he was near him he was walking abreast of him. Prisoner did not turn off the Ipswich-road to go towards Woolston Railway Station, but kept on towards Oxley. It was about a quarter-past 5 o’clock in the afternoon when he saw the prisoner.

    By Mr Blair: Witness first spoke to Constable Auld about giving his evidence on Monday last. He did not know how Constable Auld got to know about his evidence. Constable Auld asked him if it was not about a quarter-past 5 when he saw the prisoner. Witness looked at the clock in the kitchen before he left home to take the horses to Jenkinson’s paddock. The paddock was about a quarter of a mile from the house. He walked to the paddock, and it was whilst doing so that he saw the prisoner.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: It was near his home that witness saw the prisoner passing the crossing to Woolston. Constable Auld asked witness what time it would be just before he set out to take the horses away, and witness told him the same time as he mentioned in the court to-day. He knew the time himself, and Constable Auld never mentioned any time to him.

    Alice Bielby, a sister of the last witness, residing with her parents at Woolston, deposed to seeing the prisoner at about twenty minutes past 5 o’clock on the evening of the 10th December last. He was on the Ipswich-road in front of her father’s house, going in the direction of Brisbane. As the prisoner passed the house her brother James made a remark to her, in consequence of which she looked at the time. The prisoner was wheeling a handcart, in which was seated a little boy.

    By Mr Blair: She knew her brother Ernest was going to give evidence, and also knew the nature of that evidence. He told her about it. Her father and brothers and herself had talked about it often. Her brother Ernest did not help her to fix the time. The first person she spoke to about the matter was her mother.

    Constable Auld was recalled, and gave evidence as to the finding of the carcass of the horse and the body of the boy Hill. After the finding of the body witness went back to the carcass of the horse, when Constable Glennie picked up an empty revolver cartridge about 18in from where the head of the horse had been lying. On the 27th April last he made certain measurements. He found that the distance from the carcass of the horse to the nearest spot on the Ipswich-road was 353 yards, and the distance between the carcass of the horse and the body of the boy was 144 yards. On Saturday, 6th May, he measured the distance from a spot Claude Wilson had pointed out to him to the top of the quarry on the Ipswich-road, which was 391 yards. He walked from the spot in a circular course to where the boy’s body was found, which took him four and three-quarter minutes. He walked back from the body to the spot on the Ipswich-road, which took him four and a-half minutes. It took him two minutes to walk from where the boy’s body was found to the spot where the carcass of the horse was found. He produced a portion of the hide of the pony, which was cut off the near shoulder, and which contained the brands. Early on the morning of the 29th March he went to Ipswich by train, and walked from that place to Bundamba, when he met a constable and Claude Wilson with a horse and buggy and a goat-cart. Claude Wilson directed him to a spot on the near side of the first street on the Brisbane side of the Racecourse Hotel. He left the spot for Bottomley’s butcher’s shop at 11.30 am, which distance he wheeled Claude Wilson in the goat-cart. At Bottomley’s butcher’s shop he again put Claude Wilson and the goat-cart in the buggy, and drove to Redbank Railway Station, where he took Claude Wilson and the goat-cart out of the buggy. From there he pulled Claude Wilson in the goat-cart to the Oxley Hotel. It took him thirty-five minutes to go from Goodna to Bielby’s house at Woolston. He walked at a medium pace. It took him forty-four minutes to go from Bielby’s place to the top of the Quarry Hill. While walking from Woolston to the Quarry Hill a man (also walking) passed witness on the road. If witness left Bielby’s place at 5.20, pulling Claude Wilson in the goat-cart, he would reach the top of the Quarry Hill at four minutes past 6. From the top of the Quarry Hill it took him twenty-one minutes to walk to Oxley Hotel; so that if he walked from the Quarry Hill at four minutes past 6 o’clock, he would reach the Oxley Hotel at about half-past 6 o’clock. Witness arrested the prisoner at the Brisbane Gaol on the 5th February, when prisoner made a statement to him.

    By Mr Blair: Prisoner asked witness to take the statement down. Witness replied that his hands were cold. Witness started to write, and then remarked to Mr McDonald that his hands were cold, and prisoner offered to write the statement. Prisoner said, “I do not know whether I should give you this statement till I see my solicitor; of course, I cannot expect you to advise me.” Witness told the prisoner not to give him the statement then, but to leave it with Mr McDonald till he had seen his solicitor. Prisoner then handed the statement to Mr Mcdonald. Witness understood that Mr McDonald was keeping that statement for the prisoner until he had seen his solicitor. Witness did not know that Mr McGill wrote, asking for that statement. He did not know if Mr McGill ever saw it. Witness told Sergeant Shanahan about the statement the same day. Witness saw the statement a week later at the office of the Criminal Investigation Department. It had passed out of the control of the Prison Department.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: The prisoner did not address his statement to any person. The prisoner made a verbal statement to witness relative to the contents of the statement at the time.

    At this stage the case was adjourned until 10 o’clock this morning.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Northern Territory Times and Gazette, Fri 12 May 1899 79

News by the Mail.
————

    We take the following from the latest exchanges to hand per ss Taiyuan.

Brisbane, April 18.


    EC Wilson, charged with the Oxley murder, was remanded till Monday next. It is understood that he will then be remanded for eight days to allow of his being tried at Ipswich on and 18th inst on a charge of abominable offences.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Sat 13 May 1899 80

THE OXLEY MURDER.
———○———
WILSON COMMITTED FOR TRIAL.
———

    ELC Wilson, on remand, charged with the wilful murder of the boy AS Hill at Oxley on the 10th December last, again appeared in the South Brisbane Police Court yesterday, before Mr W Yaldwyn, PM, and Messrs JA Clark, T Austin, and JH Trimble, JJP.

    Sergeant Shanahan conducted the prosecution, and Mr JW Blair (instructed by Mr R McGill of Ipswich) appeared for the defendant.

    Constable Glennie, stationed at Brisbane, deposed that on the morning of Saturday, 7th January he went to a paddock on the Ipswich-road known as Brown and Walsh’s. He went to the spot where the dead body of the boy Hill was found. With others he made a search, and found a loaded revolver cartridge, which he afterwards handed over to Constable Auld. He found the cartridge about 4ft away from the carcass of the pony. Witness visited the spot again on the 18th January. Previous to that date witness with others removed a quantity of rubbish from around the carcass of the pony for the purpose of trying to find a bullet. On the 18th January he found another empty revolver cartridge (produced).

    Cross-examination by Mr Blair: Witness had had some experience with firearms. The cartridge was an ordinary 3.80-bore—a very common kind. He thought a revolver of that bore would be very commonly in use. He did not know that it was a revolver of similar bore that was used in the Gatton tragedy.

    Acting Sergeant [George] Fay, stationed at Ipswich, deposed that he took charge of the prisoner on the 30th January last at Albany, Western Australia, and escorted him to Brisbane, where he was arrested on another charge. The prisoner was not then charged with the present offence. On the way to Brisbane from Albany witness had a conversation with the prisoner, who described his journey from Ipswich to Brisbane with the boy Claude Wilson. Prisoner made the statement voluntarily. Witness said to prisoner, “You must have felt very fatigued when you arrived at your destination,” and the prisoner replied, “I like walking exercise.” Witness then said, “Did you have any rests going along?” Prisoner replied, “I called in at Mrs Coleman’s hotel at Goodna and at another hotel along the road for refreshments.” Witness said, “You must have met a good few people between Ipswich and Oxley, and it is a wonder you did not get a lift along the road.” Witness said, “There are some very nice shady places along the road, where you could have a rest.” Prisoner answered, “I did not.” Witness said, “Then you did not go off the road, except the places you speak of,” and he replied, “No, I did not.” Witness asked, “Did you meet a boy on the way coming from an opposite direction, and riding a piebald pony?” and he answered, “I did not.” Witness said, “It is such a remarkable thing on a lonely road that you could not help noticing it.” Prisoner replied, “I am sure I did not see him, for if I did I would have noticed it.” Witness then said, “Boys and men sometimes go shooting along that road, did you hear any shots fired?” Prisoner answered, “I did not.” Witness asked, “Are you in the habit of carrying firearms?” and he replied, “I am not.” Witness asked, “Did you have any that day?” and he answered, “I did not.” Witness then said, “Of course you understand the use of them?” and he replied, “I do.” Prisoner also said, “I don’t think it is right for me to make any statements to the police, as I hear people talking and saying I am arrested for the Oxley murder.” Witness said, “You know you are not, as I read the warrant out to you on another charge, and, in the face of that, what caused you to say so?” Prisoner said what is the meaning of that bag that you showed me to-day, and bringing the man I sold it to to identify me?” Witness thought he referred to a bag which he had disposed of, and, which he claimed as his property. Witness replied, “I cannot say.” Prisoner then said. “I don’t think it will be wise of me to make any statements to the police about either case.” In the course of conversation, prisoner said, “I don’t think it would have been wise for me to have broken the pledge.” Witness said, “How is that?” and the prisoner did not reply. Witness said, “I have known you in Ipswich, seeing you almost daily, and I never saw anything that would cause me to think you drank.” Prisoner said, “It would be better if I did not break the pledge.” Up to that time the prisoner had not in any way been charged with the Oxley murder.

    Cross-examination by Mr Blair: Before witness went to Albany the knew that the boy Hill had been found shot, and he also knew that Wilson had been along that road. He had not heard that Wilson had called at Coleman’s or any other place. He did not remember hearing that Wilson had been accused of the murder. Before witness left for Albany he had heard that Wilson had called at Oxley, but had not heard from the police anything about Wilson regarding the Oxley murder. Witness received no instructions to converse with Wilson about the Oxley murder. He did not hear officially, before the conversation he had with Wilson, that Wilson was suspected of the Oxley murder. He had heard, however, that he was suspected. He had heard it in Ipswich and Western Australia. Witness did not put the questions to Wilson with a view to finding out anything about the tragedy.

    Mr Blair: Did you not put this question with a view to finding out. “You must have met a lot of people on the road between Ipswich and Oxley?”

    Witness: Yes, I did put that question with a view to finding out.

    Mr Blair: Well, why don’t you admit it at once?

    Witness, continuing, said he knew at that time that a boy had been met on the road. Between Albany and Port Adelaide the boy Claude Wilson made a verbal statement which witness partly took down.

    Mr Blair asked for the production of the statement, and witness said, “I have not got it.”

    Mr Blair (to Sergeant Shanahan): Have you got it?

    Sergeant Shanahan: I haven’t it. I never heard of it.

    Mr Blair (to witness): Do you know what has become of it?

    Witness: I believe it is destroyed, I only took it down to refresh my memory. I destroyed it accidentally myself.

    Mr Blair: Where did you destroy it?

    Witness: In Sydney, I think.

    Witness, continuing said he did not show the statement to anybody before he destroyed it. The only question he put to the boy was when he asked him “if he met a boy riding a piebald pony on the road,” and he replied, “I did.” Witness also said, “Was your father with you at the time?” and he replied, “Yes.” Witness also asked, “Did you ever see your father with a revolver?” and he replied, “Yes.” Witness never showed the boy a revolver, neither did anybody else. Witness had an ordinary bulldog revolver in his portmanteau at the time. He did not know the bore. He did not say anything to the boy about loading a revolver. The boy made a statement to Sergeant Wyer in witness’s presence. That was after witness had a conversation with the boy. When witness put the question, “There are some nice shady places along the road?” to the prisoner it was to elicit whether or not he had gone off the road. That was suggested from the conversation witness had with the boy. In great measure the whole of the questions witness put to the prisoner were suggested from what he had heard from the boy. On the journey from Albany the boy was kept separated from his father. It was done under instructions from the police authorities. The reason they were kept apart was because the boy was also a prisoner. A charge was sworn against him. Witness arrested the boy at Albany also. He could not say who signed the information against the boy. He did not see it. He had never heard who made the charge, which was one of “unnatural offence.” He id not know then what age the boy was. He had frequently seen the boy in Ipswich, and thought he was under 14 years of age. The boy was alleged to have committed that crime with his father. The boy never asked to be allowed to see his father coming across from Albany. In the case against the boy witness gave evidence of arrest, and no further evidence was offered. It was on the 14th February last, the day after they arrived in Brisbane, that witness gave evidence of arrest against the boy. It was before Mr Macfarlane, PM. Only the officials of the court were present. The boy was discharged. The police officials present were Senior-Sergeant Johnson and Sergeant Shanahan. The Commissioner of Police was not present. The boy was in court. On the trip from Albany witness never at any time informed the prisoner that his son had made a statement with regard to the Oxley murder. After hearing the boy’s statement witness suspected the prisoner. When prisoner said to witness “I hear I am arrested for the Oxley murder” a warrant might have been issued against him at that time fore that crime. Witness had heard prisoner say that he had seen a Sydney paper containing an account of the Oxley murder. It was before the prisoner had seen the paper that he told witness people were saying he was arrested for the Oxley murder. Witness read the newspapers going from Ipswich to Albany, and he knew that the prisoner was suspected of the crime. When he brought the man to identify the prisoner with regard to the bag of clothes he was not acting under instructions; he used his own judgement in the matter.

    Mr Blair: Were you given instructions before you left to use your own discretion with regard to the Oxley matter?

    Witness: It was never referred to.

    Mr Blair: Then you swear before you left nothing was said to you about Wilson and the Oxley matter?

    Witness: Yes, officially.

    Witness, continuing, said he never at any time received official instructions with regard to prisoner and the Oxley tragedy. The boy made several statements on the way back to Brisbane. One was taken by Acting Sergeant Wyer, and read to the boy by witness, and also signed by him. This referred to the Oxley matter. Mr Blair asked for the production of that statement.

    Both Sergeant Shanahan and witness said they did not have it.

    Witness, continuing, said the statement was made at Sydney on the 10th February. Claude Wilson was brought before the court at Albany, but only evidence of arrest was offered.

    Re-examined by Sergeant Shanahan: Witness’s instructions before he went over were to confine himself solely to the case of the prisoner, and to leave the boy to Acting Sergeant Wyer. It was after the statement had been taken by Acting Sergeant Wyer from the boy that witness destroyed his notes. Witness did not attach any importance to those notes then.

    Witness stated when the depositions were read over that he had a conversation with the boy before having the conversation with the prisoner. He had repeated the boy’s statement to Acting Sergeant Wyer, who then took it in writing. The boy described his trip from Ipswich to Brisbane. Witness read the statement to the boy, telling him that all they required was the truth. When he read it he asked the boy if he could understand it, and the boy replied “Yes.”

    The statement was here produced by Sergeant Shanahan.

    Cross-examination by Mr Blair: The statement consisted of a number of statements made by the boy on the way across, and these were not finally reduced to writing until they reached Sydney.

    Mr Blair tendered the statement, and hoped the bench would read it carefully.

    Constable Gaffney, stationed at South Brisbane, stated that he assisted to escort the accused from Albany in February last. During the trip the boat called at Melbourne. While she was there Acting Sergeant Fay came on board, carrying a portmanteau containing clothes. Witness and the prisoner were sitting on deck. Acting Sergeant Fay said to the prisoner, “Are these your clothes?” Prisoner replied, “Yes.” The same evening they transhipped to the steamer Peregrine, and about 7 o’clock in the evening prisoner and witness were walking up and down the deck. Prisoner said voluntarily, “What is the cause of my clothes being brought back?” and witness said, “I do not know.” The prisoner said, “I don’t think they have any right to interfere with them. I sold them when I cam to Melbourne, as I ran short of money, to pay my passage to London.” Later on prisoner said, “It seems they want to question me on the Oxley murder.” Witness said, “I know nothing about it.” Prisoner then said, “Surely half-a-dozen questions should satisfy them that I had nothing to do with it? I had no revolver or firearms of any kind, and I never carry any.” He further said, “Did they get any clue about the Oxley murder, or was it supposed to be for immoral purposes that the boy was killed?” Witness said, “I do not remember what the papers said about it.” Prisoner then said, “If a rough detective got talking to my boy he might frighten him, and if the boy would say that I left him on the road it would throw suspicion on me. But if he does be questioned I hope he will tell the truth, for I never remember leaving him on the road when coming from Ipswich to Brisbane.” Witness had not suggested anything about accused leaving the road.

    Cross-examination by Mr Blair: He remembered the prisoner telling him that he had read in the papers about the Oxley affair. He had conversations with the prisoner on different subjects. The papers stated that the police had clues to both the Oxley and Gatton murders. He did not know that Claude Wilson had made a statement before he (witness) had the conversation with the prisoner. He did not know that either Fay or Wyer had spoken to the prisoner before he (witness) had had the conversation with the prisoner. From the conversation he had with the prisoner he did not gather that some one had previously been questioning him. He saw the prisoner reading a newspaper before having a conversation with him.

    Acting Sergeant Wyer, stationed at Rockhampton, stated that he came to Brisbane in connection with the Gatton murders in January last, and during that month he left Brisbane for Albany to escort the prisoner to Brisbane. While on board the steamer Gabo witness had a conversation with the prisoner. Witness said, “I see they haven’t got any one for the Gatton murders yet; I suppose you have heard all about it?” Prisoner replied: “Yes, I saw it in the paper.” Witness asked when, and he replied, “At Melbourne.” Witness then said, “Did you hear about that other murder, a boy named Hill?” Prisoner said, “No.” Witness then said, “He was murdered near Oxley.” Prisoner said, “I wonder what the motive was,” and witness answered, “Perhaps to rob him.” Prisoner then said, “Did they find his clothes?” and witness replied, “I don’t know.” At Melbourne witness and Acting Sergeant Fay brought some clothes in a Gladstone bag on board the boat. Prisoner saw the clothes and said, “I can’t make out what they want with my clothes, except for in the Oxley case what you told me about. They may want to see if there are any blood stains on them, or for the purpose of having me identified. Were there any persons seen speaking to him?” By “him” witness understood the prisoner to mean the murdered boy Hill. Prisoner further said, “My boy can prove that I never went off the road.” Witness said, “The boy Hill was shot,” and prisoner answered, “I never carry firearms.” Witness said, “When you were coming from Ipswich did you meet a boy on the road riding a piebald pony?” Prisoner replied, “No. I met a man riding a bicycle. He wanted me to have some money. I only came that way for pleasure.” Witness asked, “Did you carry any firearms or revolver?” and the prisoner replied, “No.” Witness further asked, “Did you go off the road?” and prisoner answered, “No.” Witness afterwards saw the prisoner at the South Brisbane watch house on the 17th February last. Prisoner spoke to witness, and said, “It would be most unfortunate for them to prove I had a pistol on me. They would have to prove I had a pistol before they convicted me.”

    At this stage the court adjourned until 2.30 this afternoon.

    On the resumption of the case, Acting-sergeant Wyer was cross-examined by Mr Blair. The witness stated that he heard that the man Murphy was shot in connection with the Gatton tragedy. He heard that Murphy’s body had been exhumed, and a bullet found. He did not see the bullet, neither did he hear it was a revolver bullet. He never heard the size of the bullet. He had read something in the newspapers about it. He never read that the bullet was of the same bore as the one used in connection with the Oxley murder. He had never read that the revolver used in the Gatton tragedy was of the same bore as the one used in the Oxley murder. He had never read or heard that people attributed both murders to the same cause. Before he left Brisbane he heard that Wilson was suspected of the Oxley murder. He heard it from some of the police authorities. Sergeant Shanahan had mentioned it to him. Witness received instructions to go to Albany from Sergeant Shanahan. Those instructions had very little bearing on the Oxley murder. Acting-sergeant Fay was not present when Sergeant Shanahan told him about the Oxley murder.

    Mr Blair: Do you remember the instructions Sergeant Shanahan gave you with regard to the Oxley murder?

    Witness: Yes, distinctly.

    Mr Blair: What were those instructions?

    Witness: I don’t know that I am obliged to tell.

    Mr Blair: I insist on an answer. You can refuse if you like.

    Witness (looking at the Police Magistrate): I don’t think I am obliged to answer the question.

    Mr Blair (to the Police Magistrate): I insist on an answer, your worship.

    Mr Yaldwyn: I don’t think you can compel him to answer questions of that sort.

    Witness: I refuse to answer.

    Witness (continuing) said, acting under instructions, he took charge of the boy Claude Wilson at Albany on the 30th January. He had had several conversations with the boy, and had asked him about a revolver and a boy on a piebald pony. The boy made a statement to him at Sydney, which he took down in writing at the boy’s dictation. The boy had previously spoken to him several times about the journey from Ipswich. Sergeant Fay was not present when the boy dictated it, nor when the witness wrote. Fay was present when the boy signed it. When the boy was making the statement witness said to him, “Now mind, tell the truth.” That was before Fay joined them. Fay had never told witness that the boy had made statements to him. That was the first and only written statement witness had ever taken from the boy. He used his own discretion in talking to the boy. He had no instructions not to speak to the boy about the Oxley affair.

    Mr Blair: Had you any instructions to speak to him about it?

    Witness: I don’t wish to say that.

    Sergeant Shanahan (sharply): Oh, answer the question.

    Mr Blair: Then you refuse to answer it.

    Witness: No, I don’t. I had instructions to converse with the boy about how and when he came from Ipswich.

    Witness (continuing) said he was not instructed to ask the boy Wilson whether he met a boy on a pony while coming from Ipswich to Brisbane. He had no instructions to talk with the prisoner about the affair. He was instructed to keep the boy away from his father. The boy was kept away from his father during the trip from Albany. Acting-sergeant Fay had had conversations with the boy. He did not know if Fay ever took a statement from the boy. Fay had never told him that he had taken down in writing anything that the boy had said. Fay and witness had had conversations about what the boy had told them, and they discussed what he had told them between themselves. He knew that [some newspaper text missing here] Wilson was accused of a crime, and the nature of the crime. He never promised the boy Wilson a pony.

    Mr Blair: Did the boy ever tel you he could ride?

    Witness: No; I don’t think so.

    Mr Blair: I don’t want you to think; I want yes or no.

    Witness: Yes, he did tell me he could ride.

    Witness, continuing, said further that he never told the boy he would not live with his father again. Witness never told the boy that he would take him to Rockhampton to live with him (witness). He never showed the boy a revolver, as he did not have one during the trip. He never even saw one. Witness did not know before he left Brisbane that a bundle of clothes had been found near the body of the boy Hill. After leaving Brisbane he never read anything in any paper about the Oxley affair. Prisoner never asked to be allowed to speak to his boy on the journey back. Witness never told prisoner that his son had said certain things about him in connection with the Oxley murder. Witness was present with the boy, and Sergeant Shanahan in the office of the Commissioner for Police on the morning they arrived back in Brisbane. Witness was never present when a revolver was shown to the boy. He had never heard that one had been shown to him. Before witness took the statement from the boy he asked him to tell him all that took place on the journey from Ipswich, and to tell the truth.

    By Sergeant Shanahan: Witness had never suggested anything to the boy as to what he should say, or as to what he ought to do. He had no other instructions but to find out as much of the truth with regard to the whole proceedings.

    Constable Glennie, recalled, was cross-examined by Mr Blair, and stated that the loaded cartridge he found at Oxley he handed over to Constable Auld. He did not mark it. The one shown him was similar to it. It was stamped the same. He could not swear that he handed the cartridge (produced) to Constable Auld.

    Mr Blair asked that a note be taken in the depositions that the cartridge produced was the same one as produced by Constable Auld, and found by Constable Glennie.

    This concluded the case for the prosecution.

    The prisoner was then charged, and, in answer to the question whether he had anything to say, replied: “Your Worship, I have nothing to say.”

    The prisoner was then committed for trial to the next sittings of the Supreme Court, to be held at Brisbane on Monday, 29th instant.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Argus, Sat 20 May 1899 81

QUEENSLAND.
———
THE OXLEY MURDER
——

Brisbane, Friday.

    The Attorney-General has found no true bill against Wilson, in connection with the Oxley murder, and the charge has consequently been abandoned.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Sat 20 May 1899 82

THE OXLEY MURDER.

    We learn that the Attorney-General has found no true bill against ELC Wilson, on the charge of murder in connection with the Oxley tragedy, and consequently this case will not be further proceeded with.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 20 May 1899 83

CURRENT NEWS.
———


    ELC Wilson has been committed for trial charged with the murder of the boy Hill near Oxley.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 20 May 1899 84

QUEENSLAND.
———◦———

Brisbane, Friday.

    The Attorney-General found no true bill against Wilson in connection with the Oxley murder. The charge was therefore abandoned.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Mercury, Mon 22 May 1899 85

EPITOME OF NEWS.
————

    Extremely bad weather still prevailing at Zeehan.

     No true Bill in the Oxley murder case. Wilson the accused discharged.

Wilson’s gaol photographic sheet
Wilson’s gaol photographic sheet

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queensland police note, c. Nov 1899

Re Photograph of Wilson,
and delay in reaching CI Branch.

    Although no particular harm ensued from the fact that Wilson’s photograph did not reach the CI Branch until the 28th December, (little or no effective use having been made of it until the 9th January) yet it is to be regretted that more importance was not attached to its speedy utilisation. Sub Inspector Galbraith (immediately the photograph was secured) should have sent it to Brisbane by special messenger, as was done later with the letter written by Wilson from Melbourne — or at least it should have been posted direct to the CI Branch. The Chief Inspector also when on Saturday morning he opened the letter containing the photograph should have at once either taken or sent it to the CI Branch and given all necessary directions.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Sat 2 Dec 1899 86

POLICE COMMISSION.
———◦———
THE REPORT PRESENTED.
———
FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS.
———

    The report and evidence of the Police Inquiry Commission was presented to Parliament yesterday.

THE OXLEY MURDER.

    On the afternoon of the 14th December, Frederick John Hill reported to Acting Sergeant Small that his son, aged 16, was missing. The acting sergeant recommended him to go to Brisbane, and inquire at the Police Department. Hill reported the matter the same evening to Constable Rayner, at Nundah. After being bandied about from police office to police office, he came finally to the Criminal Investigation Branch. This office is not responsible for the work of searching for missing friends in the country, but in view of Mr Hill’s exceeding anxiety we think that he was entitled to more consideration, at the hands of Sergeant Shanahan, who, according to Mr Hill, was brusque and rude to a degree. Acting Sergeant Small acted with readiness and resource, and on the 17th December sent a telegram, which concluded as follows:—“Perhaps this man, Wilson, has enticed the boy away.” With such a possibility as this it seems incomprehensible that the department persisted in treating the case as only a missing-friend case. The father’s anxiety and continuous expressions of disbelief in the boy’s having gone away voluntarily were ignored. On the whole, we conclude that this case establishes the fact that some members of the police have a very imperfect comprehension of their duty to the public.

    Incidental to the Oxley murder, the commissioners were astounded at the evidence that the Chief Inspector kept a photograph of the man Wilson (who stood charged with a most serious offence) from the 24th to the 28th December, before making use of it either by publication in the “Gazette” or otherwise. His excuse was that it was holiday time. Also incidental to this murder was the extreme measure resorted to to bring back the crippled boy Claude Wilson. This arose from the perfunctory manner in which the police conducted their search at Brisbane for Wilson, sen.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Sat 9 Dec 1899 87

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS.
———○———

    (Notices under this head are charged 3s per insertion, and each must be authenticated by the signature of some responsible person.)

————————
IN MEMORIAM.

HILL.—In sad and loving memory of our dear son, Alfred Stephen Hill, who was so cruelly murdered at Oxley while going on a visit to Redbank Plains, on the 10th December, 1898.

    Beloved by all who knew him.

    Inserted by his loving parents, F and C Hill.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 16 Dec 1899 88

Births—Marriages—Deaths.
————————————

IN MEMORIAM.


HILL.—In sad and loving memory of our dear son, Alfred Stephen Hill, who was so cruelly murdered at Oxley while going on a visit to Redbank Plains, on the 10th December, 1898.

    Beloved by all who knew him.

    Inserted by his loving parents, F and C Hill.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 15 Dec 1900 89

Births—Marriages—Deaths.
————————————

IN MEMORIAM.


HILL.—In sad and loving memory of our dear son, Alfred Stephen Hill, who was cruelly murdered at Oxley while going on a visit to Redbank Plains on the 10th December, 1898.

    Loved by all who knew him for his gentle and winning way.

    Inserted by his parents.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 14 Dec 1901 90

Births—Marriages—Deaths.
————————————

IN MEMORIAM.


HILL.—In sad and loving memory of our dear son, Alfred Stephen Hill, who was cruelly murdered at Oxley while going on a visit to Redbank Plains on the 10th December, 1898.

    Loved by all who knew him for his gentle and winning way.

    Inserted by his parents.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Brisbane Courier, Wed 10 Dec 1902 91

IN MEMORIAM.


HILL.—In sad and loving memory of our dear son, Alfred Stephen Hill, aged 15 years and 6 months, who was cruelly murdered at Oxley while going on a visit to Redbank Plains on the 10th December, 1898.

    His memory will live for ever in the hearts of those who loved him and knew his worth.

    Inserted by his Parents.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 19 Dec 1903 92

Births—Marriages—Deaths. 

    (Notices of BIRTH, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, MEMORIAM, and RETURN THANKS, 3s per insertion, prepaid. POETRY or QUOTATIONS, 6d a line extra. These notices must be endorsed by some responsible person before they can be inserted.)

————————————
SPECIAL NOTE.

    THE SINGLE CHARGE (as above) covers the insertion of three notices in the Three Papers of the Brisbane Newspaper Company:—

QUEENSLANDER;
BRISBANE COURIER;
and
EVENING OBSERVER.
————————————

IN MEMORIAM.


HILL.—In loving memory of Alfred Stephen Hill, aged 15 years 6 months, who was cruelly murdered at Oxley, while going on a visit to Redbank Plains, on the 10th December, 1898.

    His memory will live for ever in the hearts of those that loved him.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Queenslander, Sat 17 Dec 1904 93

IN MEMORIAM.


HILL.—In sad and loving memory of our dear son, Alfred Stephen Hill, who was cruelly murdered at Oxley on the 10th December, 1898.

“Gone, but not forgotten.”

    Inserted by his parents.

 


1     The Advertiser (Adelaide), Tue 15 Aug 1893, p. 3.

2     Barrier Miner, Thu 21 Sep 1893, p. 3.

3     QSA: A/49720; SRS4190/1/48; Item ID 665880 Murder file: Alfred Stephen Hill – Sodomy charges against Wilson. All the text in this case appearing in the following font (Garamond) is part of the QSA file. Wilson’s given names have been described variously in the police file and newspapers as: Edward Liton Carns; Edward Lytton Caras; Edwards Liston Carne; Edward Carus; and Edward Leighton Cairns.

4     The Queenslander, Sat 31 Dec 1898, p. 1242.

5     The Brisbane Courier, Sat 7 Jan 1899, p. 7.

6     The Argus, Mon 9 Jan 1899, p. 5.

7     The Brisbane Courier, Mon 9 Jan 1899, pp. 4, 5. Emphasis added.

8     The Mercury, Mon 9 Jan 1899, p. 3.

9     The Argus, Tue 10 Jan 1899, p. 5.

10   The Brisbane Courier, Tue 10 Jan 1899, pp. 4, 6. Emphasis added.

11   The West Australian, Tue 10 Jan 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

12   The Argus, Wed 11 Jan 1899, p. 5.

13   The Brisbane Courier, Wed 11 Jan 1899, pp. 4, 5. Emphasis added.

14   The Mercury, Wed 11 Jan 1899, p. 2. Emphasis added.

15   The West Australian, Wed 11 Jan 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

16   The Brisbane Courier, Thu 12 Jan 1899, pp. 4, 5. Emphasis added.

17   The Queenslander, Sat 14 Jan 1899, pp. 52-3, 54. Emphasis added.

18   The Brisbane Courier, Tue 17 Jan 1899, pp. 4, 5.

19   The West Australian, Wed 18 Jan 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

20   The Argus, Thu 19 Jan 1899, p. 6. Emphasis added.

21   The Mercury, Thu 19 Jan 1899, p. 3. Emphasis added.

22   The Argus, Tue 24 Jan 1899, p. 6. Emphasis added.

23   The West Australian, Tue 24 Jan 1899, p. 5.

24   The West Australian, Tue 31 Jan 1899, p. 5.

25   The Argus, Wed 8 Feb 1899, p. 8. Emphasis added.

26   The Brisbane Courier, Wed 8 Feb 1899, p. 5.

27   The Brisbane Courier, Sat 11 Feb 1899, pp. 6, 7.

28   The Brisbane Courier, Mon 13 Feb 1899, pp. 4, 5.

29   The Argus, Tue 14 Feb 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

30   The Brisbane Courier, Tue 14 Feb 1899, p. 6.

31   The West Australian, Tue 14 Feb 1899, p. 6. Emphasis added.

32   The Brisbane Courier, Wed 15 Feb 1899, p. 5.

33   The West Australian, Wed 15 Feb 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

34   The Brisbane Courier, Thu 16 Feb 1899, p. 4.

35   The Northern Territory Times and Gazette, Fri 17 Feb 1899, p. 3,

36   The Advertiser, Sat 18 Feb 1899, p. 8. Emphasis added.

37   The Argus, Sat 18 Feb 1899, p. 10. Emphasis added.

38   Piebald pony—Of two colours irregularly arranged, especially black and white.

39   Skewbald pony—With irregular patches of white and another colour.

40   The Brisbane Courier, Sat 18 Feb 1899, p. 4. Emphasis added.

41   The Queenslander, Sat 18 Feb 1899, p. 323.

42   The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 18 Feb 1899, p. 9. Emphasis added.

43   The West Australian, Sat 18 Feb 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

44   The Brisbane Courier, Tue 21 Feb 1899, p. 3. Emphasis added.

45   The Argus, Thu 23 Feb 1899, p. 6. Emphasis added.

46   The Brisbane Courier, Thu 23 Feb 1899, p. 7. Emphasis added.

47   The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 23 Feb 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

48   The West Australian, Thu 23 Feb 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

49   The Queenslander, Sat 25 Feb 1899, pp. 338, 370, 372. Emphasis added.

50   The Brisbane Courier, Fri 3 Mar 1899, p. 5.

51   The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 3 Mar 1899, p. 5.

52   The West Australian, Fri 3 Mar 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

53   The Queenslander, Sat 4 Mar 1899, p. 380. Emphasis added.

54   The Queenslander, Sat 11 Mar 1899, p. 430.

55   The Queenslander, Sat 25 Mar 1899, p. 562.

56   The West Australian, Fri 31 Mar 1899, p. 5.

57   The Argus, Sat 1 Apr 1899, p. 7.

58   The Queenslander, Sat 1 Apr 1899, pp. 612-3.

59   The Argus, Thu 6 Apr 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

60   The Brisbane Courier, Thu 6 Apr 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

61   The Argus, Fri 7 Apr 1899, p. 5.

62   The Brisbane Courier, Fri 7 Apr 1899, p. 7. Emphasis added.

63   The Mercury, Fri 7 Apr 1899, p. 3. Emphasis added.

64   The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 7 Apr 1899, p. 5.

65   The West Australian, Fri 7 Apr 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

66   The Mercury, Mon 10 Apr 1899, p. 4.

67   The Brisbane Courier, Fri 14 Apr 1899, p. 7. Emphasis added.

68   The Queenslander, Sat 15 Apr 1899, p. 669. Emphasis added.

69   The Brisbane Courier, Tue 18 Apr 1899, p. 5. Emphasis added.

70   The Brisbane Courier, Wed 19 Apr 1899, pp. 4, 6. Emphasis added.

71   The Argus, Thu 20 Apr 1899, p. 6. Emphasis added.

72   The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 20 Apr 1899, p. 7. Emphasis added.

73   The West Australian, Thu 20 Apr 1899, p. 6. Emphasis added.

74   The Queenslander, Sat 22 Apr 1899, p. 758.

75   Barrier Miner, Tue 25 Apr 1899, p. 2.

76   The Brisbane Courier, Wed 26 Apr 1899, p. 7. Emphasis added.

77   The Brisbane Courier, Fri 5 May 1899, p. 7. Emphasis added.

78   The Brisbane Courier, Fri 12 May 1899, p. 7. Emphasis added.

79   The Northern Territory Times and Gazette, Fri 12 May 1899, p. 3. Emphasis added.

80   The Brisbane Courier, Sat 13 May 1899, p. 4. Emphasis added.

81   The Argus, Sat 20 May 1899, p. 9.

82   The Brisbane Courier, Sat 20 May 1899, p. 6.

83   The Queenslander, Sat 20 May 1899, p. 949.

84   The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 20 May 1899, p. 9.

85   The Mercury, Mon 22 May 1899, p. 2.

86   The Brisbane Courier, Sat 2 Dec 1899, p. 10.

87   The Brisbane Courier, Sat 9 Dec 1899, p. 6.

88   The Queenslander, Sat 16 Dec 1899, p. 1180.

89   The Queenslander, Sat 15 Dec 1900, p. 1200.

90   The Queenslander, Sat 14 Dec 1901, p. 1120.

91   The Brisbane Courier, Wed 10 Dec 1899, p. 4.

92   The Queenslander, Sat 19 Dec 1903, p. 9.

93   The Queenslander, Sat 17 Dec 1904, p. 13.