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1919, Norman Lovenberry - Unfit For Publication
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Norman Lovenberry, 1916

Below also see: Norman Lovenberry, 1918,
Norman Lovenberry, 1919 – Obscene behaviour,
Norman Cooper, 1923,
Lovenberry v. Lovenberry, 1924 – Divorce

 

Northern Star, Sat 22 Jan 1916 1

PERSONAL.
———◦———

    Mr G Stanley Williams, of Sydney, is staying at the Hotel Ryan.

    Mr Norman Lovenberry, 2 of Lismore, has enlisted, and is at Enoggera Camp.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Northern Star, Tue 28 Mar 1916 3

PERSONAL.
———◦———

    Private Norman Lovenberry, only son of Mrs B Lovenberry, has returned to Enoggera Camp after spending a few days with his mother.

    Following is a complete list of passengers from Sydney per the ss Orara, March 27th:—Mesdames Wills, Matthews, Baldwin, Waterhouse and child, Hacking, Mott, Stennett, Stennett, [sic] Vandenberg Brown and infant, Hunt, Rogers, Cowan, Stanton, Martin, Mitchell; Messrs Dr Watson, Morrish, Lunn, S Saunders, Baziques, C Mott, ET Hacking, W Bunnell, A Overall and child, C Ruane, H Munro, G Smith, Bater, Malempre, W Steel, Marks, Heather, HC Williams,, Parker, Clifford, McGregor, A Piddington, Bond, Lewis, T Cowan, Long, J Cohen, Rowe, Vandenberg, W Amoss, J Hunt, W Dick, Master Hunt, GS Williams, and three in the second-class.

 



Norman Lovenberry
, 1918


Northern Star, Sat 25 May 1918
4

ALSTONVILLE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY

————

    Mrs Lovenberry, Park-street, has received word from Sydney that Pte Norman Lovenberry, who has been invalided home, has arrived in Sydney, and is expected to be here to-night.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Northern Star, Wed 12 Jun 1918 5

WELCOME HOME AT COWLONG.
————

    A welcome home was tendered to Private Norman Lovenberry in the Cowlong Temperance Hall on Thursday night, 6th inst. The night was dark and wet, and not nearly as many turned up as should have on such an occasion. The hall was very tastefully arranged by lady friends, a large Union Jack (belonging to Eltham school) being hung from the ceiling. On the walls were hung flowers, flags, and bunting, and on the stage a gipsy table held a beautiful bouquet. In the absence of Mr Collings (who sent an apology) Mr JJ Gray was asked by the committee to preside. As the guest took a seat on the platform the company sang “For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow,” and gave three ringing cheers. The following programme was then gone through:—Overture, Miss A Kirkland; solo, Miss L Claydon; solo, Miss G Sidaway; recitation, Miss Moffitt; solo, Miss N Claydon; and pianoforte solo, Miss Maitland. This brought the musical part of the programme to an end. The chairman then spoke in high terms and welcomed back the returned soldier, who had proved himself to be a man, although a boy in years. He had heard his country’s call and answered it and done his bit. The Rev HL Redman also welcomed Private Lovenberry back, speaking enthusiastically of the brave boys at the front. Mr NC Gray spoke words of welcome on behalf of the IOGT Lodge, and Mr WHW Jack added his welcome and testimony to one who had gone away from all that he held dear to him to fight a foreign foe. The chairman then called on Mrs Lovenberry to pin the gold medal on her son. “For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow” was sung and cheers given. The medal, suitably inscribed, was fitted with the recipient’s battalion colors. The singing of the National Anthem and “God Bless Our Splendid Men” was followed by refreshments provided by the ladies, who did their part so well that their hero said the cakes were the best he had since he left. The company played a few games, then returned to their homes, having done their duty to one who was willing to lay down his life for his country’s sake. Private Lovenberry in responding said he did not feel up to speaking, but thanked them very much for all they had done for him and for the cordial welcome. He also stated that he had been gassed, and for three weeks could neither see not speak. He is still affected by the gassing, but his many friends wish him a speedy recovery.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Northern Star, Mon 28 Oct 1918 6

LOCAL ENLISTMENTS.
————

    The following men have been accepted for active service abroad for the week ending October 26th:—

    Norman Lovenberry, laborer, Lismore;

REJECTED VOLUNTEERS.

    Clarence Binkie, farmer, Keerrong; Victor Clyde Unicombe, railway employee, Binna Burra; Edward Newman, Laborer, Lismore; Andrew David Pearce, farmer, Casino.

 



Norman Lovenberry
, 1919


Northern Star, Thu 6 Mar 1919
7

LISMORE POLICE COURT.
———◦———
Wednesday, March 5.
————
(Before Mr JB Gibson, JP.)
————

(Before Mr R Noble, JP.)

ON BAIL FROM SYDNEY.

    Norman Lovenberry was charged by warrant with having behaved in an offensive manner in the Richmond River at Lismore on October 20, 1918. Lovenberry, who appeared on bail from Sydney, pleaded guilty. Defendant was ordered to enter into a recognisance, self in £20 and one surety in £20, to be of good behavior for 12 months, in default three months’ imprisonment with hard labor in Grafton Gaol. Defendant was also ordered to pay 7s court costs, in default 24 hours’ imprisonment with hard labor.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Norman Lovenberry, Gaol photo sheet
 8

SRNSW: NRS2467, [3/6107], State Penitentiary photographic description book, 8 Feb 1922-5 Sep 1922, No. 18509, p. 147.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 18509

Date when Portrait was taken: 7-4-1922

Name: Norman Lovenberry

Native place: Queensland

Year of birth: 19-5-1898

Arrived       Ship: BS
in Colony }   Year:

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Farm hand

Religion: Methodist

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 4¾"

Weight     On committal: 128
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Grey

Marks or special features: Scar inside right wrist outside right upper arm & on right kneecap. Scar on left kneecap. Long nose 

(No. of previous Portrait ... ) 

CONVICTIONS

Where and When

Offence.

Sentence

Central PC

6

4

1922

Stealing

6 months HL

 



Norman Cooper
, 1923


The Blue Mountain Echo, Fri 19 Jan 1923
9

WAITER IN TROUBLE.
———◦———

    Norman Cooper, [aka Norman Lovenberry], a young man of 22 Summers, pleaded guilty to forging and uttering a telegraphic money order of the value of £4, the property of Miss Ellen St Julian.

    Inspector Mitchell of the Postal Dept, prosecuted, and did it well. Accused was undefended.

    Miss St Julian, of “Ravenscraig,” said accused was waiter there. He got possession of a telegram, forged her name and collected and cashed a money order for £4.

    Leonard Legge, postal official, told how the artful Norman worked the oracle. Witness asked accused how he came to be collecting the money, and Cooper replied that Miss St Julian was the lady of the house and wanted him to collect it. Accepting the explanation, witness paid over the £4.

    Detective Sergt J Comans said he apprehended Cooper at Campsie. On being questioned on the matter, Cooper admitted everything. He said: “Yes, I did it, and it’s no use me denying it. I was working at ‘Ravenscraig,’ but the work was too hard for me there. I was ill, and I had to leave. I got the telegram and the address of Miss St Julian, and I handed in the order and signed Miss St Julian’s name. I don’t want to give any trouble, and will plead guilty.” Witness said he then took accused to the lock-up and had him remanded to Katoomba.

    On being formally charged, Cooper replied: “I’ll make full restitution of this money. I was mad to do it. This is the first time I have been in trouble in my life, and I wish the Bench to deal with the case, if possible.”

    The PM said it was beyond his jurisdiction.

    Accused was sent on to the Parramatta Quarter Sessions to be held on February 17th. Bail, in one surety of £30, or two of £15 each was allowed.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers’ Advocate, Wed 28 Feb 1923 10

PARRAMATTA QUARTER SESSIONS
————

    The Parramatta Quarter Sessions opened on Monday, Judge Armstrong presiding. Mr TE Crawford was Crown Prosecutor, Mr ET Smythe clerk of the peace, and Mr JH Murray deputy-sheriff.

FORGERY AT KATOOMBA.

    Norman Cooper pleaded guilty to a charge of having, at Katoomba, on January 5, forged a certain receipt for the payment of money, with intent to defraud.

    A sentence of seven months’ hard labor in Goulburn Gaol was suspended on accused entering into a recognisance of £15, with surety, to be of good behaviour for twelve months, and giving a bond, with surety, to repay £4 within three months.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 28 Feb 1923 11

PARRAMATTA QUARTER SESSIONS.
———◦———

    The Parramatta Quarter Sessions were continued yesterday, before Judge Armstrong. Mr Crawford prosecuted on behalf of the Crown.

    Norman Cooper pleaded guilty to a charge of forging and uttering a telegraphic money order for £4, at Katoomba, on January 5. His Honor sentenced him to seven months’ hard labour in Goulburn Gaol, the sentence to be suspended on his finding a surety of £15 and himself in a like amount to be of good behaviour for 12 months; also to find a bond to repay the £4.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Norman Cooper, Gaol photo sheet 12

SRNSW: NRS2397, [3/6014], Parramatta photographic description book, 1917-1928, No. 1556, p. 71, R5138.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 1556
Parramatta

Date when Portrait was taken: 26 April 1923

Name: Norman Cooper
(aka Norman Lovenberry)

Native place: Queensland

Year of birth: 19-5-1898

Arrived       Ship: –
in Colony }   Year: –

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Waiter in hotel

Religion: Methodist

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 4¾"

Weight     On committal:
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Hazel

Marks or special features: Scar inside right wrist, outside right upper arm, on right kneecap & on left kneecap. Long nose

(No. of previous Portrait .. 18509; 7-4-1922)

CONVICTIONS

Where and When

Offence.

Sentence

Central PC

Parramatta Q.S

  6

26

4

2

1922

1923

Stealing

Forgery and uttering

6 months H.L.

7 months H.L.
Sent[ence] to date [from] 7-1-1923

 



Lovenberry v. Lovenberry
, 1924


The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 21 Feb 1924 13

IN DIVORCE.
(Before Mr Justice Owen.)

Lovenberry v Lovenberry.

    Emily Lovenberry (formerly Flood) alleged desertion in asking for a divorce from Norman Lovenberry, to whom she was married at Sydney, on February 22, 1919, according to Roman Catholic rites. Mr Maddocks Cohen appeared for the petitioner. A decree nisi was granted, returnable in six months.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 11 Sep 1924 14

IN DIVORCE.
(Before Mr Justice Owen.)

DECREES ABSOLUTE.

    Decrees absolute were pronounced, and the marriages declared dissolved, in the following suits:—

    Emily Lovenberry v Norman Lovenberry, 15

 


1     Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Sat 22 Jan 1916, p. 4. Emphasis added.

2     To view the digitised WWI service record (service number 2228, barcode 8205384) of Norman David Lovenberry go to: www.naa.gov.au

3     Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Tue 28 Mar 1916, p. 2. Emphasis added.

4     Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Sat 25 May 1918, p. 4.

5     Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Wed 12 Jun 1918, p. 8.

6     Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Mon 28 Oct 1918, p. 5.

7     Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Thu 6 Mar 1919, p. 6.

8     SRNSW: NRS2467, [3/6107], State Penitentiary photographic description book, 8 Feb 1922-5 Sep 1922, No. 18509, p. 147.

9     The Blue Mountain Echo, Fri 19 Jan 1923, p. 2. Emphasis added.

10   The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers’ Advocate (Parramatta), Wed 28 Feb 1923, p. 1.

11   The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 28 Feb 1923, p. 15.

12   SRNSW: NRS2397, [3/6014], Parramatta photographic description book, 1917-1928, No. 1556, p. 71, R5138.

13   The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 21 Feb 1924, p. 5.

14   The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 11 Sep 1924, p. 6.

15   There is a divorce file at SRNSW: divorce number 1166, year 1923.