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1926, Henry Stafford Champion - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: Henry Stafford Champion, 1935 – Indecent assault 

 

The Newcastle Sun, Sat 19 Dec 1925 1

SERIOUS CHARGE
———◦———
SCHOOL TEACHER REMANDED
————

    Henry Stafford Champion, 45, boys’ boarding school teacher, was brought before Mr Shropshire, SM, at the Children’s Court in the morning, and charged with a serious offence at Mayfield on December 7.

    On the application of Sergeant Ward the man was remanded until Tuesday. There was no application for bail.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Mon 21 Dec 1925 2

NEWCASTLE POLICE COURT
———◦———
Saturday, December 19.
————
(Before Mr JL Shropshire, SM.)

CHILDREN'S COURT.

    Henry Stafford Champion (45), a private school teacher, was, on application of Sergeant Ward, remanded until to-morrow on a charge of alleged assault at Mayfield.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Wed 23 Dec 1925 3

NEWCASTLE POLICE COURT
———◦———
Tuesday, December 22.
————
(Before Mr JL Shropshire, SM.)

————
CHILDREN'S COURT.
———
School Master for Trial.

    Allegations of misconduct extending over several months were made by two boys in the course of hearing of evidence against a middle-aged man, a school teacher, on two charges of improper assault at Mayfield, upon which he was committed for trial at the Newcastle Quarter Sessions. Bail was allowed in sureties of £200 in each case. The arrest was affected by Detective Sergeant Ferguson and Plain clothes Constable Williams.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 23 Dec 1925 4

NEWCASTLE.
———◦———
SCHOOLMASTER CHARGED.
——

Newcastle, Tuesday.

    Charged with a serious offence, a schoolmaster, employed at a private college in the district, appeared before Mr Shropshire, SM, at the Newcastle Children’s Court to-day. The accused, who broke down completely in the dock, in a statement said that he had been in New South Wales for 22 years. He had come back from the war suffering from shell shock. Accused added that he did not want to be locked up, and would rather be sent to a lunatic asylum. In committing the accused to stand his trial at the next Quarter Sessions, the magistrate said he had no power to make an order as to where accused should go. Bail was allowed in one surety of £200, or two of £100.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Singleton Argus, Thu 24 Dec 1925 5

SCENE IN COURT
———◦———
AN INCENSED MOTHER.
————

    In a case at Newcastle Children’s Court on Tuesday, an anguished mother rushed at the accused shouting, “I will kill you. You have ruined my little boy.”

    Four constables were necessary to hold the incensed woman and to remove her from the court.

    The incident occurred at the conclusion of a case in which a teacher of a private college was charged with a serious offence upon a boy aged 9.

    On this and a second similar charge the defendant was committed for trial.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Truth, Sun 27 Dec 1925 6

ANOTHER SCHOOLMASTER
———◦———
More Stories of Immorality at Hunter College
————
ACCUSED MAN ATTACKED BY MOTHER
————
(From “truths” Newcastle Representative.)
————

Hunter College, Mayfield. Image: Truth, (Syd, NSW), Sun 27 Dec 1925, p. 11. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Hunter College, Mayfield. Image: Truth, (Syd, NSW), Sun 27
Dec 1925, p. 11. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

COALOPOLIS citizens had not recovered from the shock attending the sensational arrest of Rupert A[dam] Stigant, [see: 1925, Rupert Adam Stigant] one-time headmaster of the Hunter College, Mayfield, but now convicted felon serving a sentence of five years for an indecent assault, when it became known that another school-master from the same college had also been arrested and charged with unspeakable offences.

AND not only in school circles did these arrests cause such profound astonishment. Both Stigant and the second teacher were well-known scoutmasters in the Newcastle district, and their apprehension and subsequent exposure of their filthy practices, have been a great set-back to the movement started with such high ideals by Sir Baden Powell.

STIGANT was the first teacher from this select college to get into trouble.

    Now, this second man, whose name we cannot publish at this stage, has admitted from the dock of the Newcastle Children’s Court that he has been equally guilty of diabolical conduct.

    The evidence in the case was so disgusting that habitues of such courts remarked at its conclusion that they had never heard a worse instance of moral depravity.

    And ‘twas not the fault of the poor heart-broken mother of one of the boys that the prisoner did not get severely handled.

For when the case was over she suddenly lost all control over herself, and springing towards the dock where the prisoner was standing dejectedly, she screamed: “You dirty hound, I’ll kill you. You ruined my darling son, and you’ll pay, you beast.”

    The infuriated woman made a blow at the accused, but by this time four police officers had dashed to her, and they had to use force to restrain the by now demented woman.

Screaming and moaning, she was hustled from the court as gently as was possible under the circumstances.

    The accused man is tall and thin and slightly bald. Without collar or tie and with a listless look about him, he hung his head throughout the hearing of the case, and at times seemed on the verge of collapse.

Watched By Police

    In cold and unemotional tones a detective-sergeant told the court the whole sorry tale, but “Truth,” in the interests of public morality, cannot publish anything like all that was said in evidence.

    The officer told the court that in company with a plain-clothes constable, the boy’s mother and the lad himself, he proceeded in December 18 to the Hunter College, Bull-street, Mayfield.
    “The boy, who is but 9 years of age, left us,” said witness, “and went into the college, while the police and the mother secreted themselves outside.

“Shortly afterwards we saw the accused and the boy come from the front of the school-house and enter the accused’s bedroom. The door was closed and locked.

    “The plain-clothes constable lay down on the floor, and looked through the space between the door and the floor. Then the door was later opened and the occupants of the room came out.

    “We entered, and accused said to me: ‘Good night. I have just sent a little boy home’.”

“I said: ‘We have been outside your bedroom, and the constable has been watching and listening to what has taken place here to-night’.”

    “‘This boy told me at the police station that during the past five or six months you have been committing serious offences regularly, and also, that three or four days before the school broke up you had acted with some indecency’.”

“I Am Guilty”

    The sergeant said he cautioned the accused in the usual manner, but then he said accused held out his hands, and crossing his wrists said,

“I am guilty. I can’t help myself.”

    The lad was then asked by the detective to repeat what he had told him at the police station. He had commenced to relate a shocking story, said the detective, when accused interrupted and said:

    “Don’t ask the little boy to repeat it. Don’t blame him. I am to blame. I can’t help it. I am guilty.”

“I am worse than Stigant, if that is possible. This is a case of one hypocrite condemning another.

    “I can’t help it. Oh, I would sooner anyone to have caught me than you.”

    Accused, said the detective then said, “Take me. I am guilty!”

    At the Newcastle Police Station the prisoner volunteered a statement, which was read in Court.

    In the course of the statement the accused is alleged to have said that he went away to a scout camp at Toronto, and slept in the same tent as one of the boys, and that something occurred.

“Knew It Was Wrong”

    “I knew that such things were wrong,” ran the statement, “and I really wanted to break myself from such things. I have tried hard never to commit such a sin.”

    The statement here runs on to tell of unspeakable happenings.

Later on in the statement the accused said one boy told him Stigant had acted immorally with a boy.

“I have tried honestly never to give way to these acts.”

    Afterwards accused said to the detective, “I want you to do your best for little —–  —– to put him on the right track. I wish I had met you years ago, Mr —–.”

    When charged accused made no reply.

    Evidence of a similar nature was given by the plain-clothes officer, who added that he could not see through the window of accused’s bedroom because the blinds were drawn and pinned together, so he watched through a crack under the door.

    Relating what he heard going on in the room, witness said accused remarked to the boy, “Oh, —–, do stop to-night and be a sport!”

    The boy then said something, and they both came out of the room. The rest of witness’ evidence corroborated that of the detective-sergeant.

Boy’s Story

    At this stage the poor unfortunate mother of the lad came into Court with her diminutive son. She was advised by the Bench not to stay, but on her son expressing the wish that she remain, she did so, seating herself at the back of the Court.

    The lad on whom the offence was alleged to have been committed was then sworn, and when asked to identify the accused, he did so unhesitatingly.

    The prisoner bowed his head between his hands, and sank down on the seat in the dock, and turning his back on the young witness, remained inert throughout the hearing.

Such a story of revolting moral depravity has surely never come from the lips of a child as this boy told!

    He said he had been at the Hunter College for about a year, and about six months ago became very friendly with the accused. He said the accused had promised to give him a camera, but had not done so.

    At this stage Mr Shropshire, SM, committed accused for trial at the next Quarter Sessions at Newcastle on March 9, or at such other court as the Attorney-General may direct. Bail was allowed, self in £200, and two in £100, or one in £200.

Prisoner’s Tears

    After the customary warning had been administered, accused expressed the wish to say something. From the dock he said, ‘midst tears, and in trembling tones, that his own brother had taught him to be a pervert.

    “I told my sister when I came out to Australia that I would have nothing to do with the opposite sex.

“I tried my hardest to fight against what I have been doing. I came back from the war with shell shock.”

    “I saw a clergyman recently and he told me to go on hoping. I do hope, because I realise I have still got a soul.

    “I am very sorry for what I have done, I have tried never to do such things. But I can’t help it.

“I beg of you, your Worship, not to lock me up for the rest of my life. I would sooner be locked up in a lunatic asylum than a gaol.”

    The Magistrate informed the prisoner that he had no power to lock him up. All his province was to commit for trial. Prisoner could make any appeal to the judge that he so desired.

    Prior to leaving the court-room the sensational incident already referred to between the mother and the prisoner occurred, and for some time the poor woman’s moans and screams could be heard in the court-room.

With The Scouts

    At a later stage a second charge against the ex-school teacher and scout master was preferred, the lad in this case being a Boy Scout, 12 years of age. He was not a pupil of Hunter College.

The boy related going on a scouting expedition with accused and others at Toronto. Accused was his scout-master. At Toronto he slept in the same tent with accused, and he resisted in full what he alleged took place.

    “All the time we were at Toronto,” he said, “things occurred, sometimes more gross than others.”

    Police evidence was given to the effect that when questioned on the alleged offences at Toronto accused said, “I don’t deny it.”

    On this charge accused was also committed for trial.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Newcastle Sun, Tue 2 Feb 1926 7

PLEADED GUILTY
———◦———
Henry Champion Remanded
————

Sydney, Tuesday.

    Described as a school teacher and assistant to Rupert Adam Stigant, who is serving year’s imprisonment for a serious offence, Henry Stafford Champion, 45, pleaded guilty at Darlinghurst Quarter Sessions to-day to two charges of a similar serious nature.

    Champion was remanded for sentence.

    According to the police report, Champion, a single man, and a native of Gloucestershire, England, came to Australia in 1903. In 1916 he was employed as a teacher at a college at Hobart.

    On his return from the war he was employed at Sunbury Asylum, outside Melbourne, and in 1925 he accepted the position of assistant to Stigant at a college at Mayfield. He was a scoutmaster.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Wed 3 Feb 1926 8

CRIMINAL.
————
(Before Judge Edwards.)

    Crown Prosecutor: Mr LJ McKean.

INDECENT ASSAULT.

    Henry Stafford Champion (46), school teacher and scoutmaster, pleaded guilty to two charges of indecent assault. He was remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 3 Feb 1926 9

QUARTER SESSIONS.
No. 1 COURT.
(Before Judge Edwards.)

    Crown Prosecutor, Mr LJ McKean.

INDECENT ASSAULT.

    Henry Stafford Champion (46), a school teacher and scoutmaster, was charged with indecently assaulting two little boys, [Arthur Jack Goodman and Robert Sewell Ellis], who attended the school in which he was a teacher at Mayfield, on November 10 and December 18. Prisoner pleaded guilty, and was remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Singleton Argus, Thu 4 Feb 1926 10

NEWS IN BRIEF
———◦———

TEACHER’S OFFENCE
———◦———
REMANDED FOR SENTENCE.
————

    At the Darlinghurst Sessions on Tuesday, Henry Stafford Champion, aged 45, a school teacher, pleaded guilty to two charges of having assaulted small boys and was remanded for sentence.

    Police evidence stated the accused “professed to be a devout churchman, associated himself with religious bodies—but he was a hypocrite.”

    It was stated Champion was employed at a college near Newcastle as assistant to Rupert Stigant, [see: Rupert Adam Stigant, 1925] who is now serving a sentence of five years’ penal servitude for a similar offence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Newcastle Sun, Fri 5 Feb 1926 11

SIX YEARS’ GAOL
———◦———
Henry Champion Sentenced
————

Sydney, Friday.

    Henry Stafford Champion, 46, schoolmaster from Mayfield, was sentenced at the Darlinghurst Sessions to-day to three years’ imprisonment on each of two serious charges. The sentences are to be cumulative.

    The Judge said that under the cloak of religion Champion had been guilty of the worst offences against morality.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Barrier Miner, Sat 6 Feb 1926 12

ASSAULT ON BOYS
———◦———
School Teacher Gaoled
————

Sydney, Saturday.

    Three years’ penal servitude on each charge, the sentences to be cumulative was imposed on Henry Stafford Champion (45), a school teacher, who had pleaded guilty to two charges of having assaulted little boys.

    “There can be nothing more shocking than for a school master to misconduct himself,” said Judge Edwards at the Darlinghurst Sessions in sentencing the accused. Judge Edwards added: “And all the time you covered yourself by church membership.”

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Sat 6 Feb 1926 13

CRIMINAL.
————
(Before Judge Edwards.)

    Crown Prosecutor: Mr LJ McKean.

SENTENCES.

    The following persons, who had pleaded guilty, or who had been convicted, were sentenced:—

    Henry Stafford Champion (46), schoolmaster, two charges of indecent assault on boys. The police report showed that, at a college in Hobart, Tasmania, where he was employed as teacher, Champion was found misconducting himself, and was given the option by the rector of the college of enlisting or being handed over to the police. He chose to enlist. After his return from the front prisoner was employed at the Hunter College, Mayfield, near Newcastle.

    The sentence was three years’ penal servitude on each charge, the terms to be accumulative.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Northern Star, Sat 6 Feb 1926 14

SCHOOL TEACHER’S CRIME.
————
SEVERE SENTENCE
———

Sydney, Friday.

    Three year’s penal servitude on each charge, the sentences to be cumulative, was imposed on Henry Stafford Champion, aged 45, school teacher, who had pleaded guilty to two charges of having assaulted little boys. “There can be nothing more shocking than for a school master to misconduct himself,” said Judge Edwards at the Darlinghurst sessions in sentencing the accused, “and all the time you covered yourself by church membership.”

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 6 Feb 1926 15

QUARTER SESSIONS.
No. 1 COURT.
(Before Judge Edwards.)

    Crown Prosecutor, Mr LJ McKean.

SENTENCES.

    The following persons, who had either pleaded guilty, or been convicted during the week on the various charges on which they had been arraigned, were dealt with yesterday as stated:—

    Henry Stafford Champion, 46, schoolmaster and scoutmaster, two charges of indecently assaulting two little boys, who were pupils in a college at Mayfield, at which prisoner was a master, three years’ penal servitude on each charge cumulative (six years in all). It was stated that the prisoner came from Gloucester, England, in 1903, and had been a teacher in various schools. He was caught in the act of committing an offence of a similar nature in a college at Hobart, Tasmania, and was then given the option of either enlisting in the AIF or going to gaol, and, choosing the former, he served with a pioneer unit in France.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Singleton Argus, Tue 9 Feb 1926 16

ASSAULT ON SCHOOLBOYS
———◦———
SIX YEARS’ IMPRISONMENT
————

    Henry Stafford Champion, aged 46, a schoolmaster from the Newcastle district, was in Sydney sentenced to six years’ improsonment [sic] on two charges of assaulting boys under his control.

    The police report showed that, at a college in Hobart, Tasmania, where he was employed as teacher, Champion was found misconducting himself, and was given the option by the rector of the college of enlisting or being handed over to the police. He chose to enlist. 17 After his return from the front prisoner was employed at the Hunter College, Mayfield, near Newcastle.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Henry Stafford Champion, Gaol photo sheet 18

SRNSW: NRS2467, [3/6116], State Penitentiary photographic description book, 30 Dec 1925-2 Jun 1926, No. 21393, p. –


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 21393

Date when Portrait was taken: 3-2-1926

Name: Henry Stafford Champion 19

Native place: England

Year of birth: 23-1-1880

Arrived       Ship: Ortona
in Colony }   Year: 1903

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } School teacher

Religion: C. E.

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 10¾"

Weight     On committal: 138
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Grey

Marks or special features: Scar on heel right thumb. Hair thin on top of head.

(No. of previous Portrait ... ) 

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Sydney Q.S

 

2

2

1926

Indecent assault on a male person
(2 charges)

3 years P.S. on each charge (accumulative)

 



Henry Stafford Champion
, 1935

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 1 Jun 1935 20

LAW NOTICES.
———
Tuesday, June 4.

QUARTER SESSIONS.

    No. 1 Court.—Henry Stafford Champion, indecent assault (for plea only). John Cecil Williams, false pretences (for plea only); Ralph Edwin Gates, embezzlement (for plea only); Clive Albert Roach, break, enter, and steal (for plea only); Percy Jack McDonald, break and enter with intent to steal (for plea only); Norman Leslie Marlow, break, enter, and steal (for plea only); James Thomas Reynolds, break, enter, and steal (for plea only); John Knight and James Simpson, burglary; Sidney Williams and Allan Barber, maliciously inflict grievous bodily harm; Joseph Phillip Trim, break, enter, and steal; Bruce Tudor, being found at night with housebreaking implements in possession.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 4 Jun 1935 21

LAW NOTICES.
———◦———
Tuesday, June 4.
———

QUARTER SESSIONS.

    No. 1 Court.—Henry Stafford Champion, indecent assault (for plea only).

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 12 Jun 1935 22

QUARTER SESSIONS.
(Before Judge Curlewis and juries.)

    Crown Prosecutor, Mr McKean, KC, instructed by the Clerk of the Peace.

SENTENCES.


    Henry Stafford Champion, 55, clerk, who had pleaded guilty on June 4 to a charge of indecent assault, [on John Wesley Gummerson], was sentenced to two years’ hard labour and declared an habitual criminal.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Henry Stafford Champion, Gaol photo sheet 23 

SRNSW: NRS– [17/1513], State Penitentiary photographic description book, c. 1935-?, No. 29046, p. –.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 29046
No. 143/92.

Date when Portrait was taken: 5-6-1935

Name: Henry Stafford Champion

Native place: England

Year of birth: 23-1-1880

Arrived       Ship: “Ortona
in Colony }   Year: 1903

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } School teacher

Religion: C of E

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 10½"

Weight     On committal: 132
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Grey

Marks or special features: Scar on heel of right thumb. Hair thin on top of head.

(No. of previous Portrait .. NSW 109/256.)

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Sydney Q.S

4

6

1935

Indecent assault on a male person

2 years H.L. and declared an Habitual Criminal.

2 previous convictions.

 


1     The Newcastle Sun, (NSW), Sat 19 Dec 1925, p. 5.

2     Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Mon 21 Dec 1925, p. 2.

3     Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Wed 23 Dec 1925, p. 13.

4     The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 23 Dec 1925, p. 14.

5     Singleton Argus, Thu 23 Dec 1925, p. 3.

6     Truth, (Syd, NSW), Sun 27 Dec 1925, p. 11. Emphasis in original and added.

7     The Newcastle Sun, (NSW), Tue 2 Feb 1926, p. 5.

8     The Daily Telegraph, Wed 3 Feb 1926, p. 4.

9     The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 3 Feb 1926, p. 12.

10   Singleton Argus, Thu 4 Feb 1926, p. 2.

11   The Newcastle Sun, (NSW), Fri 5 Feb 1926, p. 5.

12   Barrier Miner, Sat 6 Feb 1926, p. 1.

13   The Daily Telegraph, Sat 6 Feb 1926, p. 9.

14   Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Sat 6 Feb 1926, p. 5.

15   The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 6 Feb 1926, p. 12.

16   Singleton Argus, Tue 9 Feb 1926, p. 1.

17   To view the WWI digitised service record of Henry Stafford Champion (service No. 2341, barcode 3230085) go to: www.naa.gov.au

18   SRNSW: NRS2467, [3/6116], State Penitentiary photographic description book, 30 Dec 1925-2 Jun 1926, No. 21393, p. –.

19   The alias, on the gaol photograph, appears to be that of Joseph Patrick Wilmont which was rubbed out because that was not his alias. Wilmont’s photo is 21391 dated 3-2-1926.

20   The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 1 Jun 1935, p. 8. Emphasis added.

21   The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 4 Jun 1935, p. 6. Emphasis added.

22   The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 12 Jun 1935, p. 10.

23   SRNSW: NRS– [17/1513], State Penitentiary photographic description book, c. 1935-?, No. 29046, p. –.