Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/178353/domains/unfitforpublication.org.au/html/plugins/system/gantry/gantry.php on line 406
1928, Ernest Hochstrasser - Unfit For Publication
Text Size

 

 

Ernest Hochstrasser, 1923

Below also see: Ernest Hochstrasser, 1924
Ernest Hochstrasser, 1928
Ernest Hochstrasser, 1948

 

Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent, Fri 27 Apr 1923 1

DUBBO SHOW.
———◦———

SPECIAL

    Best Painting, any subject.—Miss Doris Cooper 1, Mrs WH Meers 2.

    Best Local Sketch.—Mrs WH Meers 1, Ernest Hochstrasser 2.

    Best Painting.—Miss Doris Cooper 1, Mrs EJ Barnes 2.

 


 

Ernest Hochstrasser, 1924

 

The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, Fri 16 May 1924 2

LOCAL AND GENERAL
———•———

ARTISTIC VIEWS OF DUBBO.

    Mr E Hochstrasser has shown us an admirable pencil sketch of three views of Dubbo., the largest being of the busy part of Macquarie-street from the old Globe Hotel westward, and the small pictures showing the Convent and the Church of England. Mr Hochstrasser exhibited his picture at the Show, and although not taking a prize it appears as a work showing much ability and skill with the pencil. 

 



Ernest Hochstrasser
, 1928

Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent, Tue 10 Jan 1928 3

LOCAL AND GENERAL
———•———

DEATH OF INFANT.
———

    Bruce Hogan, the 12 months’ old son of Mr and Mrs JJ Hogan, of Peak Hill, died in a private hospital at Dubbo yesterday morning. The body was conveyed by road this morning for interment in the Catholic portion of the Peak Hill cemetery. Mr J Tighe was the undertaker.

—————
SIX MONTHS’ GAOL
———

    Ernest Mockstrasser [aka Ernest Hochstrasser], a Swiss, was before the Children’s Court at Dubbo yesterday on a charge of indecent exposure before children. Mr Bromhead, PM, sentenced him to six months in Bathurst Gaol. It was his second offence of the kind. Mockstrasser had been working about town, mostly on gardening jobs. The children who came forward to give evidence against him are to be commended.

—————
STORM AT NARROMINE.
———

    On Saturday afternoon a violent storm broke over portions of the district and did damage. It was particularly fierce at Narromine for the short time it lasted. Part of a roof was carried off the Western Stores’ premises, and heavy limbs of trees were to be seen strewn in all direction about the locality. Fortunately no one was injured. Fifty points of rain fell.

—————
STORM AT TRANGIE.
———

    A heavy wind and rain storm, accompanied by hail, was experienced at Trangie on Saturday afternoon. The wind blew trees down throughout the district, and Mr Stoneman, a Trangie gardener, had a number of fruit trees blown down and his tomato crop damaged. Forty points of rain fell, but at Gin Gin over an inch was recorded in a short time.

—————
DROWNED AT TRANGIE.
———

    A man named Alexander Hockey, aged about 55, who was reported missing on Saturday, was found drowned in the Government Tank at the Cowal, near the Trangie railway station, yesterday morning. Deceased was well known in the Trangie district, having worked on different stations for years past, but latterly had been droving. He is survived by two children , who live at Bathurst, and two brothers at Rockdale. His wife pre-deceased him about 18 months ago. An inquest will be held to-day.

 


 

Ernest Hochstrasser, 1948

 

The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, Tue 16 Nov 1948 4

BITTEN BY SNAKE
CAT TAKES REVENGE

Who was it said: “Revenge is a sweetmeat which must be sucked and not swallowed?” If that is not among the classic quotations it was good enough philosophy for a cat at Mr Tom Gordon’s property, Boundary Road.

    It is on record that this cat was bitten by a snake some two or three years ago. When discovered it was a very sick feline and its ninth life was despaired of. The late Mr Rushby, who at that time practised as a veterinary surgeon in Dubbo, gave it little hope of continuity of life on this coil.

    However, it made a miraculous recovery to ultimately exact revenge for the injury it had received at the fangs of his snake ship.

    How many reptiles pussy has dispatched in the years between, is not known, but a recent incident can be vouched for by Mr Ernest Hochstrasser, who is a well-known Dubbo gardener living at Boundary Road.

    Mr Hochstrasser was resting one afternoon at Mr Gordon’s orchard when he heard a commotion. Investigating the disturbance to his siesta he was amazed to see a four-foot six inch brown snake being harassed by eight or nine cats progeny of the heroine of this story. Ma Pussy was taking a leading part in the shadow sparring which was going on. The cats moved in and out of the fray with lightning rapidity and in vain the snake struck first at one and then the other. After cleverly dodging the knock-out drops for some time, our heroine got a lethal stranglehold which she did not relax until the snake had given up the ghost.

    Then came the feast Ma cat considered, that having given the snake his quietus, she was entitled to the lion’s share. She proceeded to tast the sweets of victory and only desisted when she found there was too much snake and not enough cat. At this stage only the tail was left which the lookers-on were allowed to demolish.

    Truly “Revenge is a mouthful for a god.”

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Mon 29 Nov 1948 5

TO-DAY’S TOPICS


    A CAT BELONGING to Mr T Gordon, of Boundary-road, Dubbo, which survived a snakebite two or three years ago, has been taking revenge by killing off any reptile she finds. This is the way a Dubbo newspaper reported a recent incident, vouched for by a local resident, Mr Ernest Hochstrasser: “Mr Hochstrasser was resting one afternoon at Mr Gordon’s orchard when he heard a commotion. Investigating, he was amazed to see a 4ft 6in brown snake being harassed by eight or nine cats, progeny of the heroine of this story, Ma Pussy was taking a leading part in the shadow sparring. The cats moved in and out of the fray with lightning rapidity and in vain the snake struck first at one and then another. After cleverly dodging the knockout drops for some time, our heroine got a lethal strannglehold which she did not relax until the snake had given up the ghost.”

 


1     Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent, (NSW), Fri 27 Apr 1923, p. 8.

2     The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, (NSW), Fri 16 May 1924, p. 4.

3     Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent, (NSW), Tue 10 Jan 1928, p. 2. Emphasis added.

4     The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, (NSW), Tue 16 Nov 1948, p. 1. Emphasis added and in original text.

5     Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, (NSW), Mon 29 Nov 1948, p. 2. Emphasis in original text.