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1928, William Wallace Muir - Unfit For Publication
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William Wallace Muir, 1910

Below also see: William Wallace Muir, 1928,
William Wallace Muir, 1932

 

Evening News, Wed 18 May 1910 1

STRUCK BY A SCULLER.
————
A MYSTERIOUS ATTACK.
————

    A somewhat peculiar case of assault on shipboard was ventilated at the Water Police Court on Tuesday.

    William Wallace Muir, a young man, passenger from England by the White Star liner Medic, made application through his solicitor for a warrant to issue for the arrest of one George Wright, another passenger, on a charge on having assaulted him on board the vessel in Hobson’s Bay, Victoria, on May 5 last. The accused man Wright was, it was believed, in Sydney and could be found.

    The Magistrate: This occurred while the vessel was in the port of Melbourne.

    The Solicitor: Yes.

    The Magistrate: I do not know that you need apply for a warrant. Why not go into the case now and be done with it one way or other?

    Dr Sydenham F Moore, engaged on the Medic, said that on the afternoon of May 5 last, while the vessel was in Hobson’s Bay, he saw Muir and Wright talking together on the deck near the gangway. They appeared to be in friendly conversation, and no high words were used. Muir moved away, and while he was looking up towards the smoke stack, Wright dealt him a violent blow on the jaw, which felled him. Witness attended the injured man, whose face was swollen and cut on the inside. He would be likely to suffer a deal of pain for time afterwards.

    William Wallace Muir said that he made Wright’s acquaintance on the voyage out. He had been all the time on friendly terms with the other. As the vessel was leaving the Port Melbourne Pier, on May 5, Wright and another passenger named Bell were in conversation with witness. There was no dispute, and the talk was an ordinary one. Witness had no idea of there being anything wrong. “I was speaking quietly,” he said, “when something attracted by [sic] attention, and I turned towards the smoke stack. The next thing I knew was that I felt a punch on my jaw, and I feel on the deck. I was picked up by another passenger, Mr Bell.”

    The Magistrate: Can you assign any reason for it all?—None at all. I thought he was a teetotaller. He was a sculling man and came out here. I believe, to obtain engagements. He remarked to me that if he did not obtain work he had enough money to keep him for two years. I believe he was under the influence of drink at the time.

    The magistrate, after hearing other evidence in corroboration, fined Wright £5, with £2/6s costs, in default two months’ hard labor.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 18 May 1910 2

ON THE STEAMER MEDIC.
———◦———
PASSENGERS IN CONFLICT.
————
AN EX PARTE HEARING.

    At the Water Summons Court yesterday, before Mr CN Payten, SM, William Wallace Muir, a recent arrival from England by the steamer Medic, asked, through his solicitor, Mr Maddocks Cohen, for a warrant for the arrest of George Wright, a fellow passenger, who, he alleged, had assaulted him on board the steamer while lying in Hobson’s Bay on the 5th instant.

    Mr Payten: Did this occur while the vessel was at Melbourne?—Yes; but Wright is in Sydney, and can be found.

    I do not know that you need apply for a warrant; why not go into the case now and be done with it one way or the another?

    Dr Sydenham F Moore, engaged on the Medic, said that on the afternoon of the day in question he saw Muir and Wright talking together on the deck of the vessel. Muir moved away, and Wright struck him a violent blow on the jaw, knocking him down. Muir’s injuries were attended to by witness, who said that Muir would be likely to suffer for some time from the effects of the blow.

    William Wallace Muir, a passenger by the Medic, stated that he made Wright’s acquaintance on board. And was on friendly terms with him. When the steamer was leaving Melbourne Wright with another passenger were conversing with witness, the talk being an ordinary one without feeling. He was quietly speaking, when, owing to his attention being attracted, he turned round, and immediately felt a blow on the jaw, which knocked him down. He gave no provocation, and could give no reason for the assault, as there was nothing said to cause irritation. Wright is a sculling man, and, he believed, came out here to obtain engagements. Wright told witness that if he did not obtain work he had sufficient funds to keep going for a couple of years.

    James Edmund Bell, a passenger, who was talking to Muir and Wright, said that Wright seemed desirous of fighting someone, and Muir said that he had no desire to fight, but would have a friendly bout with gloves if Wright wished. While Muir had his hands in his pocket Wright suddenly struck him on the jaw. Muir gave him no provocation.

    Defendant was fined £5, with £2 6s costs, or in default two months’ imprisonment with hard labour.

 


 

William Wallace Muir, 1920

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 5 Mar 1920 3

LICENSING COURT.
———◦———

    At the Metropolitan Licensing Court yesterday, the following publicans’ licenses were transferred:—

    Unity Hotel, Lane Cove-road, North Sydney, from Jack Collins to William Wallace Muir;

 


 

William Wallace Muir, 1928

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 5 Oct 1928 4

LAW NOTICES.
———
Friday, October 5.
———

QUARTER SESSIONS.

    The following appeal against the adjudication of the Licensing Court will be heard at the Darlinghurst Court House:—S McCulloch and others, adjudication of the Licensing Court refusing grant of petition for publican’s license to Joseph James Raphel Punch for premises at Crow’s Nest, for judgment. Antonio Boulizos, embezzlement (part heard); Robert James Lennon, stealing; Dudley Budden, stealing postal articles (for plea only); William Wallace Muir, lewdness (for plea only).

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 17 Oct 1928 5

LAW NOTICES.
———
Wednesday, October 17.
———

QUARTER SESSIONS.

    William Wallace Muir, lewdness (for plea only); Henry Lathem Barnes, manslaughter.

JOHNSON APPEAL.
———◦———
PRESS ARTICLES QUOTED.
———
“PARASITICAL JUDGES.”
——

    The hearing of the appeal of Jacob Johnson, secretary of the Australian Seamen’s Union, against a sentence of six months’ imprisonment on a charge of having attempted to intimidate seamen, was continued in the District Court yesterday, before Judge Cohen.

    Cross-examined by Mr Lamb, KC, (for the Crown), Johnson admitted having written an article in the Seamen’s “Journal” headed, “Constitutional Scabbery,” in which he stated that no decent man, woman, or child would lend themselves to acts of “scabbery.” He had also written … “they have flouted the Arbitration Court because they realise they are entitled to more than a parasitical Judge will give them.”

    Mr Lamb: To which Judge were you referring?—None in particular. It is a phrase often used in trade union circles.

    Johnson admitted having written to the Newcastle branch of the Seamen’s Union during the progress of the cooks’ strike, that should an attempt be made to man the Huddart, Parker vessels “our officers and members have a duty to perform to assist the Cooks’ Union.”

    Mr Lamb: Did you advocate in one of your articles in the Seamen’s “Journal” that the workers of Australia should do what the workers of Russia did?—I advocated that, in order to change the social system, constitutional action, along the lines followed in Russia, should be taken.

    Mr McTiernan objected that the articles mentioned by Mr Lamb were written five years ago, and had no bearing on the present case.

    Mr Lamb: Johnson has taken the oath of allegiance to the Crown, and, despite the fact that he has broken that oath over and over again by his advocacy of revolutionary means of settling disputes, he is attempting to make this Court believe he is a quiet, peace-loving citizen.

    Mr McTiernan: If the articles were as revolutionary as you say they are, Johnson would have been prosecuted at that time..

    Mr Lamb: He should have been prosecuted on several occasions.

    Mr McTiernan: He had never been before a criminal Court until this occasion.

    Mr Lamb (to witness): You want us to believe that the Russians changed their social conditions in a constitutional way?—Yes; they changed them because the majority wanted them changed, which is constitutional.

    Mr Lamb: That is enough for me.

    Mr McTiernan: You have been always opposed to the Communist party?—Yes, because they believe in minority rule, and I favour majority rule.

    Witness said that he recently took steps to prevent the seamen becoming involved in the waterside strike.

    The hearing was adjourned till to-day.

    Mr McTiernan and Dr Evatt (instructed by Messrs Sullivan Bros) appeared for the appellant; and Mr Lamb, KC, and Mr Bowie Wilson (instructed by the Commonwealth Crown Solicitor), represented the respondent, GMB Longmore.

 


 

William Wallace Muir, 1932

The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 26 Sep 1932 6

LAW NOTICES.
———
Monday, September 26.
———

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION COMMISSION.

    Bridge and Young streets.–Before his Honor Judge Perdriau, and Messrs Commissioners Routley and Halliday.—

    In the matter of determination between William Wallace Muir and Elliott’s and Australian Drug Co, Ltd;

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 29 Sep 1932 7

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION
COMMISSION.
(Before Judge Perdriau and Messrs Routley
and Halliday.)

MUIR v ELLIOT’S and AUSTRALIAN
DRUG, Ltd

Bligh Street: Metropolitan Life Assurance, Elliott’s & Australian Drug Co, The New South Wales Club, Adyar House, Savoy Theatre, c.1935. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Bligh Street: Metropolitan Life Assurance, Elliott’s & Australian Drug
Co, The New South Wales Club, Adyar House, Savoy Theatre, c.1935.
Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    William Wallace Muir, of Gorge-s River-road, Enfield, sought a determination in respect of injuries received on October 23, 1931, when, while carrying timber, his left knee became twisted, and he fell with his left leg doubled under him. Applicant was paid £4/16/9 from the date of the accident till August 5, and was then given employment by the respondent; for two weeks. He now claimed compensation as from August 20, on the ground that he was still disabled.

    Respondent denied that applicant was still disabled, and contended that all money payable had been paid.

    The commission made a determination in favour of the applicant for 30/ a week as from August 20, 1932.

    Mr ES Miller (instructed by Mr Abram Landa) appeared for the applicant; and Mr Nicholls, of Dawson, Waldron, Edwards, and Nicholls, for the respondent.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 13 Feb 1933 8

LAW NOTICES.
———◦———
Monday, February 13.
———

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION COMMISSION.

    Bridge and Young streets, Sydney.—Before his Honor Judge Perdriau and Messrs Commissioners Routley and Halliday.—

    Before the Registrar.—To settle Awards.—At 10.30 am.—

    In the matter of a determination between William Wallace Muir and Elliotts and Australian Drug, Limited;

 


1     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 18 May 1910, p. 3. Emphasis added.

2     The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 18 May 1910, p. 7. Emphasis added.

3     The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 5 Mar 1920, p. 5.

4     The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 5 Oct 1928, p. 10. Emphasis added.

5     The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 17 Oct 1928, p. 12. Emphasis added.

6     The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 26 Sep 1932, p. 5.

7     The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 29 Sep 1932, p. 6.

8     The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 13 Feb 1933, p. 4.