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1929, Charles Anthes - Unfit For Publication
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Edward Charles Anthes, 1904
Below also see: Charles Anthes, 1929
Anthes v. Anthes, 1929, 1930 – Divorce

 

The Australian Star, Thu 3 Nov 1904 1

HOW A RING WAS STOLEN.
———◦———

    Edward Charles Anthes, [aka Charles Anthes], 19, labourer, pleaded guilty at Newtown Police Court yesterday to a charge of having stolen one gold ring, valued at £10, the property of Alexander McFarlane, at Hurstville, on October 27. The accused was sentenced to two months’ hard labour, which term of imprisonment was suspended upon his entering into recognisances to be of good behaviour for a period of 12 months.

    Evidence was tendered that the accused was drinking at prosecutor’s house, and annexed the ring from a drawer in the kitchen. He placed it in a matchbox, which he planted under a step leading to the entrance of his sister’s home at Kogarah.

 



Charles Anthes
, 1929

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 5 Feb 1929 2

LAW NOTICES.
———
Tuesday, February 5.
———

QUARTER SESSIONS.


    No. 2 Court.—William Anderson, stealing a motor car (for plea only); Ernest Wallace Tanner, break, enter, and steal; Alfred Lahiff, false pretences; Robert Blake, fraudulent misappropriation; Charles Anthes, serious offence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The National Advocate, Wed 6 Feb 1929 3

A FAIR JUDGE
———◦———
ACCUSED AND JUDGE CURLEWIS.
————

Sydney, Tuesday.

    “I think you are a fair Judge,” said Charles [or Edward Charles] Anthes (40), who at the Darlinghurst Sessions to-day was convicted before Judge Curlewis of a serious offence. Accused added that he would leave the challenging of the jury to His Honor.

    Judge Curlewis, while thanking accused for the honor, said the law would not allow him to do that. “You may challenge the jury yourself,” he added.

    Accused: Oh, well, I will challenge five of them.

    Five jurors, who were waiting to be sworn, appeared to be very thankful.

    In his defence, Anthes said he remembered nothing of the circumstances. “I had much rather the police had shot me,” he added.

    The jury returned a verdict of guilty and Anthes was remanded for sentence.

    Anthes was later sentenced to two years’ imprisonment. Judge Curlewis said he would recommend that the prisoner be placed under medical observation as he did not think he was sane.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Wed 6 Feb 1929 4

CURRENT TOPICS.
————

ACCUSED PRAISED JUDGE.

    A unique situation arose at the Darlinghurst Sessions, in Sydney, yesterday, when Charles Anthes, aged 40, declared he would leave the challenging of men called to the jury box in the hands of Judge Curlewis. His Honor, however, explained he had no power to do so, and told accused he would have to do it himself. Anthes then said he would challenge five jurors, who were about to take the oath. They looked pleased when they were ordered to stand down. Anthes was charged with having committed a serious offence. He told the Court he remembered nothing of the circumstances, and said he would much rather the police had shot him. The jury returned a verdict of “Guilty,” and accused was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment, his Honor making a recommendation that he be placed under medical observation.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 6 Feb 1929 5

QUARTER SESSIONS.
No. 1 COURT.
(Before Acting Judge Rowland.)
Crown Prosecutor, Mr VH Treatt.

No. 2 COURT.
(Before Judge Curlewis.)

    Senior Crown Prosecutor, Mr LJ McKean.

CHALLENGING JURORS.

    Charles Anthes, 40, carpenter, who was convicted on a charge of having committed an act of bestiality at Paddington on December 20, when informed that he might challenge any juror, said that he would leave the challenging to his Honor, who he thought was a fair Judge. His Honor explained that, fortunately, he was not allowed to do so, but informed the accused that he had the right to challenge eight jurors. As five jurors were then about to be sworn, the accused said he would challenge the lot of them, as well as the next three, and they were accordingly asked to stand down.

    The defence of the prisoner was that he was so drunk at the time that he did not know what he was doing, and he would much rather the police officer had shot him. He was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment with hard labour, and his Honor recommended that he should be kept under medical observation.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Northern Star, Thu 7 Feb 1929 6

NOT THOUGHT SANE
————

Sydney, Wednesday.

    When Charles Anthes was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment on a serious charge concerning a young girl [sic] at Darlinghurst Sessions to-day, Judge Curlewis said he would recommend that the prisoner be placed under medical observation, as he did not think he was sane. Anthes replied, “Very good, your Honor.” When the case commenced, Anthes caused a stir by asking the judge to challenge the jury for him.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Charles Anthes, Gaol photo sheet
 7

SRNSW: NRS2467, [3/6123], State Penitentiary photographic description book, 8 Nov 1928-21 Mar 1929, No. 23577, p. 409.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 23577

Date when Portrait was taken: 6-2-1929

Name: Charles Anthes

Native place: Majors Creek

Year of birth: 7-2-1884

Arrived       Ship: BS
in Colony }   Year:

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Builder

Religion: C of E

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 3¾"

Weight     On committal: 122
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Brown

Marks or special features: Scar left eyebrow & outside right shin

(No. of previous Portrait ... ) 

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Newtown PC

Sydney Q.S

2

5

11

 2

1904

1929

Stealing

Beastiality [sic]

3 months HL Suspended

2 years HL

 



Anthes v. Anthes

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 31 Jul 1929 8

IN DIVORCE.
(Before Mr Justice Owen.)

(Before Mr Justice Stephen.)

Anthes v. Anthes

    Ida Frances Anthes (formerly Deschamps, nee Boysden) sought a divorce from Edward Charles Anthes on the ground of habitual drunkenness and cruelty for three years and upwards. The parties were married on April 19, 1916, at St Peters, according to the rites of the Church of England. His Honor granted petitioner a decree nisi, returnable in six months. Mr Isaacs (instructed by Messrs CM Marsh and Harvey) appeared for petitioner; respondent was not represented.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 26 Mar 1930 9

IN DIVORCE.
(Before Mr Justice Owen.)

DECREES ABSOLUTE.

    In the following suits the decrees nisi previously granted were made absolute:—

    Ida Frances Anthes v Edward Charles Anthes.

 


1     The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 3 Nov 1904, p. 8.

2     The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 5 Feb 1929, p. 4. Emphasis added.

3     The National Advocate, Wed 6 Feb 1929, p. 3. Emphasis in original and added.

4     Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, Wed 6 Feb 1929, p. 6.

5     The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 6 Feb 1929, p. 12.

6     Northern Star, Thu 7 Feb 1929, p. 8.

7     SRNSW: NRS2467, [3/6123], State Penitentiary photographic description book, 8 Nov 1928-21 Mar 1929, No. 23577, p. 409.

8     The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 31 Jul 1929, p. 10.

9     The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 26 Mar 1930, p. 12.