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1902, Raymond Kelly - Unfit For Publication
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Eliza Kelly, James Kelly and Raymond Kelly, 1900

Below also see: Raymond Kelly, 1902 – Stealing, Bestiality


The Bombala Times and Manaro and Coast Districts General Advertiser, Fri 13 Apr 1900
1

NEWS & NOTES


   OUR Craigie correspondent writes:—Mrs [Eliza] Kelly, James, and Raymond Kelly were committed for trial at Bendoc on Saturday on a charge of sheep stealing. Constable [John] Shannon prosecuted. Accused reserved their defence. All the witnesses were bound over to appear at Bairnsdale on 24th instant.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Bombala Times and Manaro and Coast Districts General Advertiser, Fri 4 May 1900 2

ALLEGED SHEEP STEALING.
———◦———

    James Kelly, Raymond Kelly, and Eliza Kelly were presented at the Bairnsdale Supreme Court, on Tuesday, April 24, before His Honor M Justice Hood, and a jury of twelve, on a charge of stealing and killing a sheep, the property of James Mealing and others, at Quinburra, near Bendoc, on the 9th March.

    Accused pleaded not guilty.

    James Mealing, a farmer residing near Bendoc, deposed that he was joint owner with his sister in some sheep, which were branded E on the back; the ear mark was an L reversed on the right ear for ewes and left for wethers. There we3re about a thousand sheep in the flock. The selection of Henry Kelly7, the father of the two male prisoners and the husband of the female prisoner, was contiguous to witness’s block. On the 16th March he met Constable Shannon at the Big Bog, nearly opposite the Kelly’s house. He saw the two male prisoners, who turned back on seeing witness and the constable. He saw the entrails of a sheep in an old working, and in an old race near by he saw the paunch of a sheep. He discovered the leg of a sheep amongst the entrails. He saw a pool of blood and two pieces of moleskins, which he handed over to Constable Shannon. His impression was that a sheep had been killed and dressed there. On the 18th March he and his brother dragged an adjacent water hole and discovered some pieces of wool. Alex. Armstrong stripped off his clothes, went into the water hole, and discovered the skin of a ewe, branded with witness’ s brand. The earmark was missing. The skin had been sunk in the hole by having a stone attached to it. The value of the sheep would be 12s.

    Other evidence was given by William Mealing, Albert Ivill, John Scott, and George Armstrong.

    Constable John Shannon, stationed at Bendoc, deposed that on 16th March he went with J Mealing to the bog frontage of Armstrong’s land. He related what he saw there, as detailed by previous witnesses. He accosted James Kelly, and asked him where he got the last sheep. Kelly replied that he got it from Wm Forest the week before last. “But you took the carcase of a sheep home last Friday,” observed the constable. Kelly denied that, saying he took no meat home last week. Raymond Kelly admitted having seen the entrails once, but said he knew nothing about them. James Kelly denied picking up the entrails and throwing them into the waterhole. At the waterhole Mrs Kelly asked what was the matter. “There has been a sheep killed here and I suppose they think I did it,” replied James Kelly. “That will have to be proved. You know you did not do it,” replied Mrs Kelly. James Kelly said “There has been a sheep killed here right enough. Wait till I go into court and I will swear against some of them.” Witness then accused James Kelly of killing the sheep. Mrs Kelly said, “You’ll have to prove it. No meat was brought home. I’ve plenty of meat. I killed a sheep I got from Forest the week before last. I’ve got a piece boiling in the pot and you can see it.” On the way to the lockup James Kelly asked what he was charged with.

    “At present, with having a carcase in your possession last Friday night, and very likely, later, with sheepstealing,” replied the constable. “What will I get? Two years?” asked James Kelly. “Not for having stolen meat in your possession. You may be charged with stealing,” replied the constable. On 17th March he went to Mrs Kelly’s house and asked her where all the mutton was she was going to show him. She said they had only a little bit, and had eaten it that morning. On the 13th he saw the sheepskin recovered. It was the skin of a ewe. On the 19th, in the lockup, he charged James Kelly and Raymond Kelly with sheepstealing.

    His Honor thought there was no case against the female prisoner, and that the evidence against Raymond Kelly was very weak.

    Mr Gurner pointed out that the female prisoner was present when the carcase was brought home.

    His Honor: But she may have thought it came from Forest’s, like the previous one.

    Mr Gurner: It was proved she had no mutton in the house until the arrival of this particular carcase.

    His Honor held there was no case against the female prisoner or Raymond Kelly and said he would direct the jury to acquit them. In the meantime they could leave the dock.

    Mr Stuart addressed the jury.

    Prisoner James Kelly said the sheep he brought home was one he got from Forest and that he came by it honestly.

    After hearing the address of Mr Gurner, and the summing up of his Honor, the jury retired, and after a short deliberation brought in a verdict of not guilty and the accused were discharged.—Bairnsdale Advertiser

 


 

Raymond Kelly, 1902


The Bombala Times and Manaro and Coast Districts General Advertiser, Fri 25 Apr 1902
3

DELEGATE
————
(From Our Own Correspondent)
————


    A lad named Kelly was arrested at Craigie on Tuesday on charges of larceny and beastiality. The case will probably be heard on Thursday. The police are now engaged in working up the case.

    At the Police Court on Thursday morning, before Messrs Rodwell and Jeffreys, J’sP, a lad named Raymond Kelly was charged with stealing a whip, of the value of 6/-, the property of Harold Groves, of Craigie. Senior-Constable Stutchbury deposed to the arrest of the accused on the 22nd inst. The evidence for the prosecution went to show that in January last the accused was in the employ of Mr Jno Groves, of Craigie, and while there he wanted to buy a whip from Harold Groves, who offered to let him have it for 6/-; a sale was not effected, and a few days prior to the accused leaving Mr Groves’ employ the whip was missed from the woolshed. Harold Groves identified the whip produced as his property. At the conclusion of the evidence for the prosecution, the accused pleaded “not guilty” to the charge, but declined to make a statement or call evidence, and elected to be summarily dealt with by the Bench, who considered the charge fully sustained, and fined him £1 or 14 days in the lockup; the whip being returned to Mr Groves. The fine was not paid.

    The same defendant was further charged with that he did, on the 15th inst, at Craigie, commit an unnatural offence. On the application of the police the case was adjourned till the 30th inst, for the production of further evidence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Delegate Argus and Border Post, Sat 26 Apr 1902 4

POLICE COURT, DELEGATE.
————
Thursday, April 24.
————
(Before Messrs Rodwell & Jeffreys, JsP)

RAYMOND KELLY, a lad about 16, was charged with stealing a whip of the value of 6s, the property of Harold Groves, of Craigie.

    George Stutchbury deposed: I am a Senior-constable of Police, stationed at Delegate; on the 22nd inst, in company with Constable Boardman, and Constable Shannon, of Bendoc, I saw the accused at Quinburra, on the NSW side of the border line, and had arrested him on a charge of committing an unnatural offence; he had the whip now produced in his possession; I asked him where he got the whip, and he replied that he found it on the Craigie road, close to the Church of England building; I told him that it answered the description of a whip lost by Mr Groves; at the lockup this morning I charged him with stealing the whip from Mr Groves’ woolshed on the 10th January last, and he made no reply.

    William Boardman deposed: I am a constable of police, stationed at Delegate; I was resent when the accused was arrested on the 22nd inst, on the NSW side of the Victorian border; I heard the Senior-constable ask the accused where he had got the whip he then had in his possession, and he replied that he picked it up on the Craigie road, at that church near Mr Groves’; the whip produced is the one the accused had in his possession.

    Harold Groves deposed: I reside with my father, at Ila, near Craigie; I know the accused, Raymond Kelly; he was harvesting for my father in January last; the accused wanted to buy a whip from me, and I told him I would let him have it for 6s; he did not buy the whip; the whip was kept in the shearing shed; acv had free access to the shed; a few days before the accused left my father’s employ I missed the whip; the whip produced is my property, and is the one I offered accused for six shillings; I never authorised the accused to take the whip; at the time the whip was stolen I valued it at six shillings.

    By the Bench: I never disposed of the whip to any other person, or never authorised anyone to dispose of it for me.

    This closed the case for the prosecution.

    The accused, who pleaded “not guilty,” declined to make a statement or call evidence, leaving the matter in the hands of the Bench to deal with.

    The Bench considered the charge sustained, and fined the accused £1; in default, 14 days in the lockup; the whip to be returned to Mr Groves. Fine not paid.

    The same defendant was further charged with that he did, at Craigie, on the 15th inst, commit an unnatural offence. Senior-constable Stutchbury gave evidence as to the arrest of the accused, and the nature of the offence, and applied for a remand until the 30th inst, for the production of further evidence, which was granted.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Delegate Argus and Border Post, Sat 3 May 1902 5

POLICE COURT, DELEGATE.
————
Monday, 28th April.
————
(Before Messrs AH Jeffreys and AM
Wright, JsP.)


    Raymond Kelly deposed: I am at present doing fourteen days at Delegate lockup for larceny; I know the two accused [Bert Duke alias JB Foster and Alexander Armstrong]; I have seen them at Craigie; on Sunday, the 13th inst, I was at Craigie in the evening; I saw the accused at Craigie that evening; remember Armstrong saying to me, “I would like to see that tail of Billy Reed’s mare cut off,” or “I would like to cut the tail off Billy Reed’s mare,” I am not sure which he said; remember meeting Armstrong evening, the 14th inst, on Craigie reserve; Armstrong said to me, “Did you see old Billy Reed’s mare.” He said I ought to go and have a look at her; he told me where she was, and seemed to be making a joke of it; he said, “I believe that is the hair up there we will go and have a look.” He took me to where there was some black and white hair lying on the ground; it was like the hair produced; I am on good terms with the accused Armstrong.

    By the accused Armstrong: I was about 20 yards from the hair when I met you.

Wednesday, April 30.
(Before the PM and Messrs D Campbell,
T Rodwell, & AH Jeffreys, JsP)


    Raymond Kelly, charged with committing an unnatural offence at Craigie on the 15th April, was, after the hearing of evidence for the prosecution (which we deem unfit for publication), committed to take his trial at the next Court of Quarter Sessions to be holden at Bombala on the 5th of August next. Bail allowed. Self in £50, and two sureties in £50 each, or one in £100. Bail not forthcoming.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Bombala Herald and Delegate, Cooma, Eden and Coast District General Advertiser, Wed 6 Aug 1902 6

[BOMBALA] QUARTER SESSIONS.
————
Tuesday, 5th August, 1902.
————
(Before Mr Acting-Judge Harris.)

    Mr C Murphy, JP, in the absence of Mr HM Joseph, acted as Deputy Sheriff.
    The Crown was represented by Mr Cornelius Delohery.

————

    Raymond Kelly was charged with, on the 15th April, at Craigie, committing an unnatural offence .
    Accused pleaded not guilty.
    Mr Panton appeared for accused.
    Jury:—Messrs E Gaunson, RH Cook, Alex Caldwell, D Montgomery, Wm Haggar, Trevor M Morgan, J Crotty, DJ Sinclair, G De Costa, Chas T Cotterill, Jas Jones, and D Jennings.
    The evidence in this case, which was very lengthy, was unfit for publication.
    Mr Panton addressed the jury at length. His Honor then summed up, at the conclusion of which the jury, without retiring brought in a verdict of not guilty, and Kelly was discharged.

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.
———◦———

    THERE are a couple of cases of typhoid fever in Cooma.

…         …                                                      …

    SATURDAY next has been gazetted a public holiday.

…         …                                                      …

    READ Mrs Ah Hung’s advertisement in this issue.

…         …                                                      …

    SNOW was noticeably on the hills on Thursday morning last. This is its first appearance as yet this winter.

…         …                                                      …

    WADE’S WORM FIGS, the wonderful Worm Worriers, are always effective 1s boxes.

…         …                                                      …

    MR P JONAS has for sale to-morrow (Thursday), several valuable blocks of land in and around Bombala, also dray, &c.

…         …                                                      …

    LAST Monday night about 9 o’clock, after an exciting chase, a fine humper whale was caught in the bay at Eden. This makes the fourth whale of the season.

…         …                                                      …

    AT the Cooma Quarter Sessions the following gentlemen were sworn in by Acting Judge Harris, as Justices of the Peace:—Messrs Percy William Jenkins, Nimitybelle, and Morgan Thornton, Nimitybelle.

…         …                                                      …

    WE have received a letter from Brisbane, from Messrs Fitzgerald Bros, the leading circus proprietors of Australia, stating that their mammoth Show will shortly visit Bombala. They have made wonderful progress since they were here some twelve years ago.

…         …                                                      …

    IN the case of the Crown v Raymond Kelly, at the Quarter Sessions yesterday, the Judge complimented Mr Panton on the logical and able manner in which he had defended the accused. The Judge also referred, in complimentary terms, to Mr Panton’s defence in the case of Adam Havers.

…         …                                                      …

    THE evidence in the case of G Groves v Thos Ingram appears on the fourth page.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

…         …                                                      …

           MR HR BRYAN notifies that he is prepared to transact land business at his office in Maybe-street.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

…         …                                                      …

    THE traction engine en route to Cooma, has broken down on the “Native Dog” Hill. The driver had to return to Bombala on Friday to have some repairs effected.

…         …                                                      …

    A MEETING was held in St Matthias’ (Church of England) School Room on Thursday 31st July. It was decided to hold a social in the School of Arts early in September, in aid of the funds for the repair of the Sunday School.

…         …                                                      …

    IN a football match Delegate v Cathcart played on Saturday, Cathcart won by 3 points to nil. The visitors were entertained at a splendid repast provided by Mrs Foley, of the Federal Hotel,  in the evening.

…         …                                                      …

    THE Quarter Sessions and District Court have already run over two days, and the latter will not conclude till to-morrow. The remaining cases are P Rootsey v Bombala Municipal Council, for work done; and Alfred Miller v WE Panton, for disputed bill of costs.

…         …                                                      …

    IN connection with the Coronation celebrations, the school children of the town and district are requested to meet at the School of Arts at 3 o’clock, on Saturday. The members of both Oddfellows’ Lodges are also requested to meet at the School of Arts, at 7.30, on Saturday night, to take part in the torchlight procession. A bonfire and fireworks display will also take place.

…         …                                                      …

    ERRATA.—In our report of the Musical Society’s Concert last week, we inadvertently stated that Mr H Lancaster manipulated the limelight in connection with the musical tableaux. We now learn that the Rev F Richmond was alone responsible for the pleasing limelight effects. Mr Lancaster gave valuable assistance in “making up” the members of the company for their respective parts.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 7 Aug 1902 7

QUARTER SESSIONS AND
DISTRICT COURTS.
———

Bathurst, Wednesday.

    The Quarter Sessions opened yesterday before Judge Docker. Mr Murray prosecuted for the Crown.

    Frederick Green, aged 19 years, charged with forgery and uttering a cheque for £25, alleged to be signed by the Hon C Lee, pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to six months hard labour in Bathurst Gaol, sentence to be suspended under the First Offenders’ Act on the accused giving the necessary security.

    Ferdinand Arnold, charged with having, on April 28, at Jaunter, attempted to shoot Arthur Moeller with intent to do grievous bodily harm, and on a second count of assaulting and illtreating the said Arthur Moeller, was found not guilty.

    Thomas McAviney and Andrew Fogarty, charged with having broken and entered the house of James Holt, at Lithgow, and stealing therefrom, were found not guilty.

    At to-day’s sitting of the Court James Stanbrook, charged with having, on May 21, maliciously wounded his wife, Mary Eleanor Stanbrook, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm, was acquitted.

Bombala, Wednesday.

    The Quarter Sessions were opened at 10 o’clock on Tuesday, before Acting Judge Harris. Mr C Delohery was Crown Prosecutor.

    In the case against Bryant on a charge of horse stealing accused pleaded guilty by the advice of Mr Panton, his solicitor, and was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment in Goulburn Gaol.

    The man [Raymond] Kelly, who was charged with a certain offence, was defended by Mr Panton, and was acquitted.

    Havers, charged with embezzlement, was acquitted.

    The District Court was opened yesterday. In Goodman v Johnson a verdict was entered by consent for £41 14s 6d.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Bombala Times and Manaro and Coast Districts General Advertiser, Fri 8 Aug 1902 8

QUARTER SESSIONS.
————
Tuesday, 5th August, 1902.
————
(Before Acting-Judge Harris).
————
Crown Prosecutor—Mr C Delohery.
————


    RAYMOND KELLY, on bail was charged with, on 15th April, at Craigie, committing an unnatural offence.
    Plea—Not guilty.
    Mr Panton appeared for the accused.
    Jury:—Edward Gatinson, RH Cook, A Caldwell, D Montgomery, J Hagger, T Morgan, J Crotty, DJ Sinclair, G De Costa, CT Cotterill, James Jones, David Jennings.

    In this case the evidence was of such at nature that it would be against the interests of public morality for us to publish it in our columns in detail.

    The first witness called was William Brown, who described at length the offence alleged to have been committed by the accused. His statement of the affair appeared to leave no shadow of doubt as to the guilt of Kelly.

    This witness was followed by Isaac Beveridge, the owner of the cow in question. Beveridge put a somewhat different aspect to the case for he swore positively that the cow was not quiet and would not have permitted the handling by Kelly which Brown had sworn to.

    Constables [George] Stutchbury and [William] Boardman gave evidence as to the story told them by Brown, the subsequent arrest of Kelly, and the statement made by him when charged with the offence.

    This closed the case for the Crown.

    In defence Kelly went into the witness box and denied all that Brown had sworn to. Kelly is a lad, 16 years of age, and in his evidence he stated that he had only been at school three months of his life. It was, therefore, only natural to expect that his evidence should not be as straightforward as would have been given by a lad of better education. He stumbled many times in cross-examination and his whole demeanour throughout shewed him to be a lad lacking in ordinary intelligence. He stated that he had crossed the bridge on the morning in question with Jimmy the Chinaman and that Jimmy had gone one way on the reserve while he had gone another, and both were looking for the same horse. Asked as to whether the Chinaman might have been mistaken for him the accused said yes.

    Constable [George] Stutchbury and [William] Brown were called in reply and both of them swore that there was no resemblance between the accused and the Chinaman.

    Mr Panton addressed the jury.

    His Honor summed up.

    The jury returned a verdict of “not guilty” without leaving the box. The accused was then discharged.

NEWS AND NOTES.
————

    MR MURPHY has a quantity of old building material for sale next Thursday.

*   *   *

    MR JAMES ROBBIE’S infant, ages 11 months, died on Sunday.

*   *   *

    THE Cathcart footballers defeated Delegate at Cathcart on Saturday last by 3 points to nil.

*   *   *

    THE traction engine was stuck-up at the foot of the Native Dog Hill on Friday last. Travellers wish it was stuck-up for ever.

*   *   *

    MRS AH HUNG advertises that she is relinquishing business and is selling her store goods at a very low price to effect a clearance.

*   *   *

    A CORONATION SERVICE will be held in the Methodist Church on Sunday evening next, copies of special hymns will be provided.

*   *   *

    COOMA footballers suggest that a combined Cooma-Nimitybelle team should meet the combined Bombala team, at Nimitybelle. Such a game should prove very interesting.

*   *   *

    THE sad news reaches us that Mr T Moore, junior, has lost his youngest child at Newcastle, and Mrs Moore is very ill with consumption in the Sydney Hospital.

*   *   *

    JUDGE HARRIS at the Court on Tuesday spoke in condemnatory terms of that huge architectural blunder, the Bombala Court House. First, he complained of the position occupied by the Clerk, who, he said, shut out the view of the bar table and the dock from the Bench. “It is one of the acts of genius,” said His Honor, “for which the Colonial Architect’s department is famed.” Later on he complained of the cold, saying that it was a remarkable thing that nearly all court houses were built so as to be very cold in winter and very hot in the summer. Then again he complained of the noise on the verandah. “These places,” said the Judge, “seem to be constructed so that the noise made by persons outside can be distinctly heard in the Court room.”

*   *   *

    WHEN the case against [Raymond] Kelly for alleged bestiality, was called before the Court on Tuesday Judge Harris suggested that those having no business in the Court should leave, as the evidence was likely to be of a disgusting nature.. The crowd then filed reluctantly out, but the case had hardly proceeded any length of time before morbid curiosity had overcome their better feelings and the court was again filled with people eager to drink in the details of the disgusting story narrated by the witness, Brown. When summing up Judge Harris alluded to these persons in no very pleasant manner. “We listen to the details,” said His Honor, “because it is our duty to do so, not because we like them, we are not like the people at the back of the Court, who need not be there unless they like, and who are there of their own free-will..” And not one in the crowd flinched.

*   *   *

    AFTER the Judge’s summing up in [Raymond] Kelly’s case on Tuesday it looked as if a verdict of “guilty” would be returned, but the jury said “not guilty” without leaving the box. They evidently took the common sense view that the offence alleged to have been committed was a physical impossibility, notwithstanding the witness Brown’s apparently plausible story.

*   *   *

    THE Coronation of the King will be celebrated in Bombala on Saturday, tomorrow, by a procession of the public and children from the School of Arts at three in the afternoon to the Show Ground, distribution of medals to the children, fireworks, and bonfire at night. Mr HM Joseph has very generously donated another £5, as well as the medals, to be expended in the purchase of lollies and biscuits for the children. There will also be a torchlight procession in the evening.

*   *   *

    IN consequence of the mining office at Towamba having been removed to Jambulla in May, 1901, in the interests of the mining community, it has been pointed out that some public inconvenience occurs through the Mining Division being still called Towamba. To prevent confusion the Secretary of the Department of Mines and Agriculture (Hon John Kidd) has approved of the name of the Mining Division in question being made uniform with that of the mining office where Mining Rights and Licenses are issued, and on and from the 1st September, 1902, the name of the Division will be changed to “Yambulla.” The alteration will be duly gazetted.

DEATH.
———

ROOTSEY— August 3, 1902, at her parents’ residence, Bombala, CONSTANCE MARY ROOTSEY, aged 20 years.
    ‘Tis hard to break the tender cord,
       When love has bound the heart;
    ‘Tis hard, so hard, to speak the words,
       We for a time must part.

    Dearest loved one, we have laid thee
       In the peaceful grave’s embrace;
    But thy memory will be cherished
       Till we see thy heavenly face.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Delegate Argus and Border Post, Sat 9 Aug 1902 9

BOMBALA QUARTER SESSIONS.
————
Tuesday, August 5, 1902.
————
(Before Acting-Judge Harris).
Crown Prosecutor—Mr C Delhorey. [sic]
———


    Raymond Kelly, on bail, was charged with, on the 15th April, at Craigie, committing an unnatural offence.
    Plea—Not guilty.
    Jury:—Edward Gaunson, RH Cook, A Caldwell, D Montgomery, J Hagger, T Morgan, J Crotty, KJ Sinclair, G De Costa, CT Cotterill, James Jones, David Jennings.

    The evidence in this case was of such a revolting nature as to render it, in the interests of public morality, unfit for publication in detail.

    The first witness called was William Brown, who described at length the offence alleged to have been committed by the accused. His statement of the affair appeared to leave no shadow of doubt as to the guilt of Kelly.

    This witness was followed by Isaac Beveridge, the owner of the cow in question. Beveridge put a somewhat different aspect to the case, for he swore positively that the cow was not quiet and would not have permitted the handling by Kelly which Brown had sworn to.

    Constables Stutchbury and Boardman gave evidence as to the story told them by Brown, the subsequent arrest of Kelly, and the statement made by him when charged with the offence.

    This closed the case for the Crown.

    In defence, [Raymond] Kelly went into the witness box and denied all that Brown had sworn to. Kelly is a lad, 16 years of age, and in his evidence he stated that he had only been at school three months of his life. It was, therefore, only natural to expect that his evidence should not be as straightforward as would have been given by a lad of better education. He stumbled many times in cross-examination, and his whole demeanour throughout shewed him to be a lad lacking in ordinary intelligence. He stated that he had crossed the bridge on the morning in question in question with Jimmy the Chinaman, and that Jimmy had gone one way on the reserve while he had gone another, and both were looking for the same horse. Asked as to whether the Chinaman might have bee mistaken for him the accused said yes.

    Constable Stutchbury and Brown were recalled in reply, and both of them swore that there was no resemblance between the accused and the Chinaman.

    Mr Panton addressed the jury; after which His Honor summed up.

    The jury returned a verdict of “not guilty” without leaving the box. The accused was then discharged.

 


1     The Bombala Times and Manaro and Coast Districts General Advertiser, Fri 13 Apr 1900, p. 2. Emphasis added.

2     The Bombala Times and Manaro and Coast Districts General Advertiser, Fri 4 May 1900, p. 2.

3     The Bombala Times and Manaro and Coast Districts General Advertiser, Fri 25 Apr 1902, p. 2. Emphasis added.

4     Delegate Argus and Border Post, (NSW), Sat 26 Apr 1902, p. 5. Emphasis added.

5     Delegate Argus and Border Post, (NSW), Sat 3 May 1902, p. 6. Emphasis added.

6     The Bombala Herald and Delegate, Cooma, Eden and Coast District General Advertiser, Wed 6 Aug 1902, p. 2. Emphasis added.

7     The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 7 Aug 1902, p. 10. Emphasis added.

8     The Bombala Times and Manaro and Coast Districts General Advertiser, Fri 8 Aug 1902, p. 2. Emphasis added.

9     Delegate Argus and Border Post, (NSW), Sat 9 Aug 1902, p. 5. Emphasis added.